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14

I believe this is referring to the gag rule (aka: Pickney Resolution 3) of the US House, adopted in 1836. It read: Resolved, That all petitions, memorials, resolutions, propositions, or papers, relating in any way or to any extent whatever to the subject of slavery, or the abolition of slavery, shall, without being either printed or referred, be ...


11

You betcha! In fact, the movie was rather mild. The most famous incident in the Congress (comprising the Senate and the House of Representatives) was the caning of Senator Sumner: Walking cane used in beating Sen. Charles Sumner. Old State House Museum in Boston MA. Via Wikimedia Commons Lithograph by John L. Magee (1856). Via Wikimedia Commons On ...


11

There are several types of repeals. First, there are partial repeals where a poorly crafted portion of a law causes problems. For example, the onerous 1099 reporting section of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (aka Obamacare) was repealed. The rest of the law remains intact so far but that portion was repealed. Another recent example would be ...


9

According to this page, 298 Senators have died in office (it does not include the last member to die, who died in 2010. I included him in the previously stated number). According to this page, 815 House Representatives have died in office (it does not include the last three members to die in office. I included them in the previously stated number). Our ...


7

I think the legislatures in many countries have the same structure. A quite distant example is the Supreme Council of the USSR which also had two chambers, the Council of the Union and the Council of the Nationalities. The former was elected by the population at rate of 1 deputy per 300000 people while the later represented the constituent republics. I ...


6

As far as I understand you can use Food and Fuel Control Act of August 10, 1917 as a counter-example. It was an independent public act approved by 65th Congress. (not a list of changes to previous acts) It was repealed entirely by the Joint Resolution of 66th Congress at March 3, 1921 (with other wartime acts) Certain sections of Act were amended in ...


5

There is a provision in the Constitution for the President to propose bills to Congress. From Article II, Section 3 (emphasis mine): He shall from time to time give to the Congress Information of the State of the Union, and recommend to their Consideration such Measures as he shall judge necessary and expedient; While every President has had the ...


4

The Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 http://www.nationalcenter.org/FugitiveSlaveAct.html It was the law of the land. It was repealed June 28, 1864...14 years and a Civil War later. The ACA may have a similar affect on our country.


4

Probably the most famous and historically significant US Congressional leader was Henry Clay, who was a dominant, if not the dominant leader of the early 19th Century Congress. He was the founder and leader of the Whig party (one of the two main parties of the era), and was the driving force behind The Missouri Compromise and (as a Senator) The Compromise of ...


4

Apparently the mistake was an electoral appeal that urged Americans to vote Democratic because a vote for Republicans would ". . . be interpreted on the other side of the water as a repudiation of my leadership." . This achieved the opposite of the desired effect, losing the election for the Democrats, as the letter was (correctly) perceived as an ...


3

During WWII, did Congress show solidarity with the President? Not really. While Congress did show solidarity as far as the war effort was concerned (and that took some effort), internal politics were very much against the President. The 1942 midterm elections were the first to be held after the declaration of war. The Democrats barely won that ...


3

The Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1964 outlawed various forms of discrimation, although what they outlawed were mostly State laws it's hard to say if this is what you are looking for; since you don't make a distinction on what laws Congress has repealed. Most notably, around the same time in 1973 Congress passed the War Powers ...


3

Originally I thought that the fact it said "one or the other Houses of Congress" might have something to do with this, since the House tends to be less able to keep up traditions due to the turnover in Representatives every few years. And I was almost right. Although the date looks to be slightly off, it turns out that: February 19, 1979 On this ...


2

(Update: new summary) I have given in to my weaker loquacious side and allowed this answer to become a tar baby, incorporating many topics that are only tangential to the OP. The summary is that bicameralism is one of many governmental architectures designed to incorporate stakeholders, foster deliberation and slow consensus. Although it was a tool ...


2

What you may be confusing in this case is what is termed the War Powers Act which gives the President latitude to actually engage in military operations for up to 90 days before declaring war or going to Congress. Part of this stems from the face that Vietnam avoided this with the Gulf of Tonkin resolution which then President Lyndon Johnson used to ...


2

To expand on (and slightly correct) David Hammen, the CCC and WPA were not closed because of partisan politics. They were closed because unemployment was low due to the industrialization of the war effort. They were programs designed to combat the high unemployment and were no longer needed. As far as Congress was concerned, no. From 1938-41, Congress very ...


2

I'm familiar with the story, but it is a highly suspect claim. It is part of the Myth of the Lost Cause. The idea here is that compromise was impossible so war was the only option. For this reason, many sources may be unreliable and it would be best to use only primary sources to prove or disprove its veracity. James Henry Hammond made his famous speech "On ...


1

This quote appears to have been written in 1982. Under normal circumstances, the US's Highway Trust Fund gets all its money from gasoline sales taxes. However, in 1982 the amount hadn't been raised in nearly 30 years. This amount was clearly no longer sufficient, as congress at the end of that year felt the need to essentially double it. I'm not familiar ...



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