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15

First of all, to clarify what you asked in the subject, US didn't "lose" Vietnam war militarily. Tet Offensive was basically a disaster for them - they didn't achieve their intended strategic objective (popular uprising in the south) and suffered major losses. However, US populace lost the will to fight in that war - as noted by others, they started viewing ...


12

Up until Vietnam, the US had been training their military to fight a "conventional" war, more along the lines of what they fought in each of the World Wars. In Vietnam, the fighting was very "unconventional". In each WW, they could easily identify the enemy because they wore different uniforms and spoke a different language. In Vietnam, the enemoy spoke a ...


9

The quick answer is the Cold War. The context surrounding the assassination of Ngo Dinh Diem provides the long answer. After WWII the US and the USSR were engaged in the Cold War. The time period from 1949-1963 saw China, North Korea, and Cuba become outright communist countries, and a short lived regime sympathetic to Moscow appeared in Guatemala. This ...


8

Here's a thread on ar15.com (a gun enthusiast forum) discussing it, and coming up with a variety of experiences both confirming and denying the NATO: red, WarPac: green mantra. Here's a vendor selling both NATO and WarPac ammo, with both red and green tracers on both styles. There are also other colours in use, though seemingly less common, such as white and ...


8

The Indochine war began after negotiations were suspended between the Viet-Minh and the French Republic in 1946 (the date is often the insurecction on the 19th december, but in fact, the French bombed Haiphong on the 23th november, some even trace it to the leave of General Leclerc, the military administrator, in 1946). The US involvement only began in 1954 ...


8

The fall of South Vietnam was due to an invasion from North Vietnam in 1975, with little or no support from South Vietnamese insurgents. As the US was essentially gone from South Vietnam, it's arguable that the US didn't lose the war (although the South Vietnamese certainly did). In 1972, there was a similar attack from the North, but there were still US ...


7

In my opinion, I think the only reason US+South Vietnam lost the war is due to the willingness of Southern people in the war. Vietnamese people have a long tradition of nationalism. They don't accept any invasion from outsiders. North Vietnam took advantage of this. They conducted propaganda to show that US was invading Vietnam and Vietnamese people had the ...


6

The main reason was that the people just supported the North. The reasons may vary, but the South were considered a force fighting for the interests of the invaders and the North were simply liberators. One of the previous answers notes that totalitarian governments can sustain higher losses. This does not do anything with the reality of Vietnam. How can ...


6

Hawks Robert S. McNamara Secretary of Defense during the Kennedy, and Johnson administrations. Henry Kissinger for his work prior to becoming National Security Advisor. Lyndon B. Johnson for his escalation of the war. John F. Kennedy for his involvement prior to the declaration of war. Doves John Lennon for his activism. Ron Dellums for his election ...


6

Among some of the more notable officers were: Lieutenant Colonel Mukaiyama, reportedly a staff officer in the 38th Army who became a technical advisor to the Vietnamese; killed in combat in 1946. Credited by some as the leader of Japanese forces in Vietnam, and sometimes ranked as a full colonel. Major Ishii Takuo, a staff officer in the 55th Division who ...


6

The question assumes that the Vietnamese people are a singular entity. The process of liberation seems to indicate that this was not the case. However, as Vietnamese society was clearly polarised in this period between a small proportion of the population who supported the RVN and a larger proportion of the population who supported abolishing the RVN and ...


4

In USA foreign policy ruled Domino theory that speculated if one country came under influence of communists, surrounding country might also get communist. USA wanted to stop spreading of communism so they got involved in Vietnam war in 1964. Lyndon B. Johnson in 1963 said: The battle against communism... must be joined... with strength and determination. ...


4

A tracer projectile is constructed with a hollow base filled with a pyrotechnic flare material, often made of phosphorus or magnesium or other bright burning chemicals. In NATO standard ammunition (including U.S.), this is usually a mixture of strontium compounds (nitrate, peroxide, etc.) and a metal fuel such as magnesium. This yields a bright red light. ...


4

In 1996, the North Vietnamese defense minister published an article in the Wall St. Journal about the moment when he felt that North Vietnam had won the war. It was when "Hanoi" Jane Fonda went to the North Vietnamese capital in 1972 to express her "solidarity" with them, returned home, and wasn't severely punished. Then the North Vietnamese felt that she ...


3

The wording of your question seems to suggest that you are looking for an answer that is framed solely in terms of armed engagements. Answered in those terms, the Viet Cong were severely weakened by the time the US withdrew completely. But ultimately that doesn't matter. The VC had the will and wherewithal to continue. The US and ARVN did not. One of the ...


3

While the Vietnamese Communist Party had been involved in militant anti-French agitation from the early 1930s, and, while large number of Vientamese workers (including agricultural workers) and peasants had hungered for freedom from the French government—including its fish sauce tax—it was the elimination of the old party leadership by the Japanese in ...


3

I hate to be flip here, especially since the echoes of Vietnam still reverberate, and our domestic politics still suffers from that war. The nature of the Vietnam war was a war of attrition. The official name of Saigon now is Ho Chi Minh city. Nuff said.


2

Japan conquered IndoChina (Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos) during WWII. After the war, the French went back to retake their colonial territory, but communist fighters, the Viet Minh, were trying to also take control. The First Indochina War broke out. (The Vietnam War is also known as the Second Indochina War) So, the US entered the war because: the US signed the ...


1

882,000 Vietnamese casualties, of whom about 444,000 were soldiers, and 200,000–300,000 Cambodian casualties, according to Wikipedia. And, in addition, it is estimated that as many as 210,000 soldiers and civilians, from an assortment of other nations, primarily Laos, were also killed.


1

Kennedy approved of Diem's overthrow, but naively believed assurances given that Diem would be protected and granted exile. http://consortiumnews.com/2013/11/25/jfks-embrace-of-third-world-nationalists/ It was because of Diem's murder that Kennedy immediately regretted the coup occurring. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xEJdtodFcDQ


1

Considering that some people consider Vietnam a loss, or the one we returned from without achieving our objectives, then I would suggest that there was no "win" here. As user44 rightly notes, the government and cities in Vietnam changed hands in the 1970's so that pretty much says it all. Although if you look at it the Tet Offensive was more a public ...



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