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27

Everyone learnt from the Korean War and wished to avoid a repeat of a bloody direct Chinese-American fighting. At the onset of the escalated American involvement in 1965, Beijing made it clear where the Chinese line in the sand is: [I]f the Americans went beyond the bombing of the North and used ground forces to invade North Vietnam, China would have to ...


8

Related: It's worth noting the little (apparently) known fact that the Chinese and Vietnamese held Vietnam Warr part 3* between themselves after the end of part 2 with substantial losses on both sides. (*Part 1 - with France, part 2 with USA). Significant disgreements exist to the present and various "incidents" involving deaths on both sides (mainly ...


7

Hawks Robert S. McNamara Secretary of Defense during the Kennedy, and Johnson administrations. Henry Kissinger for his work prior to becoming National Security Advisor. Lyndon B. Johnson for his escalation of the war. John F. Kennedy for his involvement prior to the declaration of war. Doves John Lennon for his activism. Ron Dellums for his election ...


6

Wikipedia's page on conscription actually gives a pretty good breakdown. In WWII, males between 18 and 64 were required to register, but the selections were limited by executive order on December 5, 1942 from from 21–45 to 18–38. Assuming the citation (George Q. Flynn, The Draft, 1940–1973) is correct, 50 million men from 18 to 45 were registered. The ...


6

Among some of the more notable officers were: Lieutenant Colonel Mukaiyama, reportedly a staff officer in the 38th Army who became a technical advisor to the Vietnamese; killed in combat in 1946. Credited by some as the leader of Japanese forces in Vietnam, and sometimes ranked as a full colonel. Major Ishii Takuo, a staff officer in the 55th Division who ...


5

A general trend I have noticed in French history, dating from the fall of France after the defeat at Waterloo and the subsequent losses in the Congress of Vienna, is that there is a strong urge to regain a sense of international prestige. Through out the nineteenth century France slowly degrades from being the world capital of liberal democracy and ...


5

Dong Ap Bia is a mountain in Vietnam. Since the lighter has the dates (19)65-66, it was probably used (and engraved) by a soldier stationed in support of the Montagnards who lived on and around the area. In that area of Vietnam there were no straight, flat roads, and in fact no roads at all. So every where a soldier had to go they did it up and down (...


4

The Japanese conquered Singapore a much more visible, if smaller target with some 35,000 men (far fewer than the defenders). They also conquered the Philippines with a force of about 130,000 men, against mixed American-Filipino forces. That was because of two reasons. 1) the Japanese troops were better at jungle fighting than the French, British and ...


4

In USA foreign policy ruled Domino theory that speculated if one country came under influence of communists, surrounding country might also get communist. USA wanted to stop spreading of communism so they got involved in Vietnam war in 1964. Lyndon B. Johnson in 1963 said: The battle against communism... must be joined... with strength and determination. ...


3

There is something to BrotherJack's answer but just considering it an “irrational” urge for greatness and prestige is a little short-sighted. A few other factors: France had a huge colonial empire, not only Indochina. Defending its claim to Indochina was also a way to show it did not intend to give up all this. It's still debatable whether colonies in ...


3

Japan did not conquer Vietnam, it had already been conquered by the French. For most of the war Japan left the existing French colonial government in place and negotiated the rights to station troops there and move them through the country. Initially, Japan was only interested in Northern Indochina to cut off supplies to China. To this end they signed an ...


2

Soviet-Chinese relations were at the lowest point at the time of Vietnam war. Even if Vietnam government wanted to get full support from two sides, they would have to choose. And for many years since then Soviet Union and Vietnam were allies not only against US but against China too. Strong Vietnam was the reason of China's failure in Cambodia (Sino-...


2

Actually China did assist Vietnam. China didn't just send a few thousand troops to repair bases. China actually sent hundreds of thousands of soldiers to help the north Vietnamese air defence. The Americans believed they could bomb north Vietnam into submission without sending ground troops into the north. So the Chinese troops were actively fighting to ...


2

Certainly there were widespread food shortages in 1988 following a drop in agricultural production, high inflation and significant unemployment. The situation in the northern provinces has often been described as famine, though there are few statistics about how many people died. The only numbers I could find was from the following Asian Bulletin [Vol 13, ...


2

Japan conquered IndoChina (Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos) during WWII. After the war, the French went back to retake their colonial territory, but communist fighters, the Viet Minh, were trying to also take control. The First Indochina War broke out. (The Vietnam War is also known as the Second Indochina War) So, the US entered the war because: the US signed the ...


1

You would probably learn a lot from reading Jacques Dalloz' The War in Indo-China 1945-54. Do you belong to a good library, such as a University library? If you want to buy it Amazon UK are asking about £95 for the hardback. This is how it is reviewed by Amazon: Widely acclaimed when it appeared in French in 1987, this first general history in English ...



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