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30

The question is illogical because there was no such thing as a viking in the days of the undivided Roman Empire or of the Western Roman Empire. A viking is defined as a Scandinavian pirate or sea raider during the period of about 795 to 1100 AD at the widest. It is always incorrect to capitalize viking and use it as an ethnic word instead of an ...


14

There are many theories on why the Viking expansion occurred and there is no real consensus on which (or which combination) is the correct one. This particular explaination, that Pagan Scandinavia attacked Christian Europe in an ideological response to the Carolingian expansion, is merely yet another theory on this highly contentious topic. Although it seems ...


7

I presume you're not talking about the Byzantine half of the Roman Empire here. Those ties are well known. So, taking the subject line of your question, Romans of the western half of the Roman Empire meeting Vikings would be impossible because Rome fell before the label Viking was generally applied to Scandinavians. Taking the text of your question, the ...


7

This is an interesting and difficult question. Unfortunately, not much is known of Viking equipment, including clothing, because such military goods were relatively expensive and rare. For example, in those times (800-1000 AD) it was common for people to go barefoot, shoes were so expensive. Written works from the time rarely discuss viking clothing in any ...


5

"Vikings" were not a "race"! Neither were they a nation or an ethnos. "Vikings" was a name given in the Middle Ages to Scandinavian warriors who attacked many places in Europe. Scandinavian warriors not only plundered, they also settled in various countries, including Britain. England experienced several waves of invasion from Northern Europe, after the ...


5

Infectious diseases require a certain critical mass of people to become endemic in a population. Smaller than that, and they burn themselves out by making every susceptible person either immune or dead. The smaller and more isolated the population, the more quickly this happens. Based on what I'm seeing in Epidemics and Pandemics: Their Impacts on Human ...


5

Leaving aside the questions whether Scandinavians during the first centuries CE could be called "vikings", the answer is that they did encounter them. The Cimbrians were a people who invaded Italy and fought the Romans about 100 BCE. The Cimbrians are said to have come from the Cimbrian peninsula, identified with Jylland in Denmark. As for Roman invasions ...


3

Aside from some short inscriptions on stone, no. The received texts of the sagas generally all date to after about 1000 A.D. and were written or copied at times when Christianization had taken hold. That said, however, it is important to remember that it is likely that the received texts may, in many cases be close copies of manuscripts written during ...


3

TL;DR: We don't know, but at least ~170 swords bearing - in whole or in part - some variation of "VLFBERHT" are known to exist. Number of Extant VLFBERHT swords: I came across the closest available approximation to an answer we're likely to get: The finds The number of extant sword blades with the signature Vlfberht is not known... Probably the ...


3

No. That theory doesn't make a whole lot of sense. First, while the Vikings and the Germans practiced "pagan" religions, their status as "co-religionists" was tenuous at best. Nor did they have other meaningful ties (other than perhaps shared DNA through various wanderings). Vikings were not likely to think "This guy Charlemagne is hurting our Germans, so ...


3

The Mongols were a relatively backward people in the scholastic sense of the word, and hired conquered scholars to educate them. The Mongols were also very tolerant of most religions in their vast empire, and had priests help "pacify" their various peoples.


3

I can't find any evidence of Harald being shot in the back (other than figuratively). In fact, the only roughly contemporary account of his death that I can find in some casual searching is from the Chronicon Roskildense probably written in the 12th century. Note that the Chronicon was likely the earliest "history" as opposed to "saga", although being ...


2

Within the scope of artistic licence it seems to be fairly close to what Roman York is believed to have looked like. Given that Vikings didn't have a reputation for being much in the way of civil engineers it's probably reasonable to assume that Jorvik had much the same layout as the Roman and subsequent Anglo-Saxon versions. That being said, "accuracy" of ...


1

It looks like they were in fact in use as late as the 17th century by rural folk, although there is some doubt as to how ancient at least some of those runes were. The more practical ones seem to center on fishing and herding activities, which indicates the kind of people who were using them. Since the finds are in relatively recent books, you could argue ...


1

It is certainly possible. Obviously such a thing would require the monk to learn the Norse language, which would mean it would be years before he would be teaching them anything that required language to convey. Educated slaves rarely appear in the sagas and in fact slaves are rarely mentioned at all for that matter, unlike, for example, in Roman culture ...


1

No they did not. The romans, I suspect, never came up that far north. They did, however deal with the similar goths.


1

First of all, it should be noted that Norse mythology was only the longest-lasting offshoot of a much wider spread Germanic mythology. If we restrict ourselves to Norse contemporary sources, then there are only short inscriptions and pictures. For the Germanic mythology, there is one contemporary non-Christian source that must be mentioned: Tacitus. In his ...


1

In architecture "Norman" is just the insular British term for Romanesque architecture in Britain and Normandy since Romanesque architecture was basically introduced to Britain when the Norman Dynasty ruled England. It is like the insular British and American term "Victorian" for 19th century architecture. The reason why the Normans and "Normans" associated ...


1

The Normans, this "bunch of Vikings" as you call then, did not build cathedrals with their own hands. They hired stonemasons and other craftsmen to do it.



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