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16

Yes, they did. Not all, but a very many, especially the more veteran soldiers. I don't have time to get sources together, but will when I do. Reasons were varied. Some believed that being close to over-pressure events (artillery, etc) could cause a head injury with the large helmet being force up and the tough leather strap breaking the neck. This was ...


10

Yes, many did. An image search reveals plenty of examples. Although I've found few with the straps hanging, most have the straps secured tightly behind the helmet. BAR Gunner, 1st Marine Division, Wana Ridge, Okinawa 1945 Three reasons are cited (and one which is my own speculation). In close combat, an enemy can grab the visor. The idea here is an ...


3

"Sweden emerged physically unscathed from World War II." That was the whole point of its neutrality. Other Scandinavian countries suffered more because they were "involved." In Sweden's case, there was no fighting, no occupation, nothing related to war, hence "unscathed." How did Sweden emerge morally unscathed? First, even Germany and Japan were forgiven ...


3

By the tone of your question, you're seeing WWII as a crusade against evil where there can be no neutrals, and in hindsight I agree. The laws of war didn't use these categories at the time. Being neutral can mean trading with both sizes equally, or with neiter one. If one of the belligerents is closer and trades more, that happens. The US transported lend-...


2

Yes weaker powers rarely attack their much stronger neighbors. A wise general never starts a war he can't win. But if there are many small states then they will fight each other a lot, think medieval Europe. There are a few cases where weak powers attack stronger foes. One is a rising or falling power A weak power is growing quickly in strength think ...


2

Your question can be broken down into several parts. Did the NATO-led coalition deliberately try to topple the Gaddafi regime? I think we can all agree on a "yes" to that one. In doing so, did they exceed the mandate of Resolution 1973? I don't think we will get a clear answer on that. The text calls for much more than just a no-fly zone, but it ...


1

No, there is at best a weak correlation between national size and tendency for belligerence. Some examples of "small" states that started significant wars: Recent declaration of statehood by I.S.I.L. North Vietnam attacking the U.S. ally South Vietnam Italy (very definitely the junior partner of Germany and Italy) invading Greece in 1940. Nazi Germany ...



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