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42

There wasn't a lack of food in the UK, not in the sense that people weren't getting enough to eat or were suffering malnutrition. What there was is a lack of variety of food. Anything which was imported (citrus, tropical fruits, tea, coffee, sugar), expensive (meat) or important to the war effort (fats, meat, canned anything) would be rationed. Rationing ...


41

Verse 3. After crossing a river, you should get far away from it. If the river is a barrier, you can be hemmed in against it. If your enemy is the one hemmed in, they also have a defense on at least one side, preventing you from surrounding them. Verse 4. When an invading force crosses a river in its onward march, do not advance to meet it in ...


38

The British Army left in Kabul, Afghanistan after the First Anglo-Afghan War, was to leave after an Afghan uprising. The main contingent of some 16,000 troops and associated civilians was attacked throughout their journey to Jalalabad, eventually only a single survivor Assistant Surgeon William Brydon. He was asked upon arrival what happened to the army, to ...


35

The short answer is that there was a concentrated effort in post-WW2 Europe to clear known minefields. France, for example, used POWs to do the dirty work. Longer answer is that the post-WW2 period was very different than the post-Balkan Wars period. At its heart, WW2 was a "tidier" war with two opposed groups of nation states with relatively disciplined ...


31

There were several names for the war depending on the belligerent. Here are a few: Prussia and Austria: Dritter Schlesischer Krieg (third Sileasian war) (refers to Austria trying to reconquer Silesia) France: La guerre de la Conquête (War of Conquest) Britain: French and Indian War or Great War for the Empire Sweden: Pommerska kriget (Pomeranian War) ...


27

Recorded in Plutarch's De garrulitate, this is an example of a Laconic phrase: After invading Greece and receiving the submission of other key city-states, Philip II of Macedon sent a message to Sparta: "If I invade Laconia you will be destroyed, never to rise again." The Spartan ephors replied with a single word: "If" (αἴκα). Subsequently ...


26

I am not aware of any large battles with only a single survivor out of all the combatants, but there was at least one major battle that had only a single survivor on the losing side. The Battle of the Little Bighorn (or Custer's Last Stand) led to a slaughter of the American forces. Every American soldier who was present when the battle began was killed, ...


23

(1) "The Battle of France" - so called by the French. The the term "Battle of France is widely used for the WW2 fighting of the French against the German invasion. See e.g. Wikipedia Battle of France And the naming of it accordingly is attested to e.g. Winston Churchill: here ... What General Weygand has called The Battle of France is over. The ...


21

The Anglo-Swedish war of 1810-1812. A phoney war forced upon Sweden after the devastating defeat in the Finnish war; neither side wanted to fight the other, and no battles were fought. There were, however, a formal declaration of war and a signed peace, and British troops that were stationed at the Island of Hanö occupied it during the war.


21

Yes, there was a battle between the Spartans and Argives described by Herodotus. They decided to solve the dispute in a "fair way" without risking their full armies, so 300 soldiers were chosen from each side, and it was decided that the side that loses would recognize its defeat. The result was one Spartan and two Argives surviving. The Argives rushed back ...


20

The Austro-Prussian War is currently known in Germany as "Deutscher Krieg", or "The German War" - though it was originally known as "Preußisch-Deutscher Krieg", or "Prussian-German War". Another contender are the Napoleonic Wars--or the Guerres napoléoniennes, as they are called in France.


20

Certainly. In fact there was even a whole series of Sacred Wars. More specifically, the First Sacred War was fought by the Amphictyonic League against the city of Cirrha over the latter's mistreatment of religious pilgrims to Delphi. Delphi derived religious significance from its Temple of Apollo, which housed the famous Pythia - the Oracle of Delphi. The ...


19

There have been at least a few wars with more than two opposing factions. Algerian War: Opponents: Algerians aligned with one of two liberation movements ("National Liberation Front"; "Algerian National Movement") French government forces Two irregular forces ("French Algerian Front"; "Organization of the Secret Army") Northern Ireland's Troubles: ...


17

I have read your question as "Has a country ever won a war, and still "lost" territory, and if so, why?" One example was the Austro-Sardinian War, otherwise known as the Second War of Italian Independence. Sardinia (Piedmont) won the war. She did so with the help of France, under Napoleon III. She had to cede her holdings of Savoy and Nice to France to ...


16

I can think of an example of this from the ancient period: The Lamian War(323–322 BC): was known to the ancient Greeks as the "Hellenic War". Obviously there were many wars in ancient Greece that we could call "Hellenic Wars" but this particular one was explicitly noted by Diodorus Siculus as such. Independent Greek states fought on both sides of this ...


15

The Anglo-Zanzibar War fits your criterion, in part because it was so short, but it was also conducted with civil restraint. The new Sultan was suspected of assassination and violated a British treaty by occupying the palace. The British attempted negotiations and finally issued an ultimatum to vacate the palace at 0900. Half an hour before a final attempt ...


14

Some examples from WW2: Poland was on the winning side but lost the eastern half of the country to the USSR. Yes they got compensated by German territories, but we could have some fun debating the relevance of that. Britain came out a winner but it's impoverishment was a significant factor leading to withdrawal from the Empire.


13

Such scenario is not uncommon during the decolonization-related wars of the 20th century. The colonial power is often able to defeat the other side militarily, but for political or other reasons had to withdraw. Some examples: Indonesian National Revolution (1945-1949), was considered to be a Dutch military victory, since Dutch military forces were able to ...


12

One potential answer is "The People's Crusade." This certainly refers to the people fighting it (peasants instead of noblemen). I haven't found any primary source material for contemporaries calling it "The People's Crusade", but this source seems to suggest that it was called "The Popular Crusade" which is fairly close. As two sheds and Steve Jessop ...


12

How about Flower Wars, between the Aztec and their enemies? These were conducted according to very strict conventions. There were limited combatants and the location was preselected. The aim was to gain sacrificial victims, and early in the wars casualties were low (they got higher as the war went on, though). Much of the violence was the sacrifice ...


12

As a counterpoint to @Gwenn 's answer: At one point during the Battle of Guadalcanal; Mitchell Paige was the only surviving member on the American side of a key portion of the front line during a major Japanese counter attack. His Medal of Honor Citation: PLATOON SERGEANT MITCHELL PAIGE UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS for service as set forth in ...


11

Naming a war after the leader of our side (especially if he wants to be remembered for the victory, even anticipated) like in "Napoleonic Wars" as referenced by two sheds seems to be the most natural case of naming the war after one's side. In Clone Wars it's a different case: naming the war after a key or new weapon. I don't know about any war named like ...


11

UK, like most other developed (and not so developed) countries, does not produce all food that it consumes. Some food is imported in most cases. In the case of UK during WW2 much of the food was imported. As the war started, a) the oceans became dangerous. Because of the German cruisers and submarines. b) the shipping capacities were needed for other ...


11

Because they were delayed in Xuzhou, and before that in Shanghai. At first, in July 1937, fighting was localised in North China, but for various reasons, hostilities erupted in Shanghai one month later, in August, escalating the situation to a full-scale war. That battle dragged on for 3 months, with Japan landing an entire field army in the city. Without ...


11

Two talents may confidently be assumed, [...] as a moderate estimate of the cost of both hull and rigging of a trireme. (p. 364) Source: Frank Egleston Robbins, The Cost to Athens of Her Second Empire, Classical Philology, Vol. 13, No. 4 (Oct., 1918), pp. 361-388. Newer authors (relying, as far as I can tell from a very cursory examination, upon ...


10

The Slovenian war of independence, which was fought in 1991 was pretty clean by your standards. Civilian casualties are stated as 12 foreigners who strayed into the line of fire, and there were also a few Slovenian civilian casualties. But combined these were much less than the 63 military casualties. The Yugoslav army destroyed some civilian property, such ...


9

Oh boy, this is the moment to speak of the most awesome battle ever. You see, in winter 1794, a French Hussard regiment was sent to prevent a Dutch fleet, stuck in Den Helder to rejoin british forces. The Dutch Republic was in a state close to civil war and the fealty of those ship was in question. And so, a cavalry regiment had the exceptionnal ...


8

I'd name the Sonderbund War in 1848 in Switzerland. The catholic Swiss cantons attacked the protestant Swiss cantons because they wanted to separate. However, three weeks after it broke out, the cantons of Fribourg and Lucerne was successfully defeated by governmental forces and the other catholic cantons didn't want to continue to rebel. The war ended with ...


8

Wikipedia, after Hanson (2006), claims that a typical trireme took 6,000 man days to complete. If you take a 25 man crew as around the optimal size, balancing the ease of performing certain tasks against the non-linear aspects of managing large teams, that would equate to 240 days effort, or perhaps 9 months elapsed time allowing for days off, bad weather, ...


7

The initial British/French mining in the channel was as an anti-submarine barrage. Later anti-invasion fields were laid. Later in the war offensive fields were laid on the other side of the channel. Details of RN mine laying in WW2 may be found here



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