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Andrew Roberts new biography Napoleon the Great contains the following relevant passage: It is a well-known historical phenomenon for a sexually permissive period to follow one of prolonged bloodletting: the ‘Roaring Twenties’ after the Great War and the licentiousness of Ancient Roman society after the Civil Wars are but two examples. Although ...


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On example of this phenomenon, is this song, written in 1941, as America was "approaching" war. It was actually written from the woman's point of view, for her man to give her "something to remember you by, when you are far away from me," and was an "invitation." Prior to that, American women of the so-called World War II (and previous) generations had ...


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An almost categorical no, but I stick with a hardly. As Rajib pointed the war as a complex system, and one single variable not decide the entire destiny, and note the entire British contribution to defeat Germany was not that big. The Red Army [...] defeated 75%–80% of the German land forces (Wehrmacht and Waffen-SS) deployed in the war. Wikipedia So, ...


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Yes. Off the top of my head, jauhar is reminiscent of the Siege of Masada. Looking at the wikipedia entry for jauhar (which you linked), I see also a reference to Balinese puputan. Finally, here is a list of historical mass suicides, a number of which fit the jauhar pattern (women of a defeated group suiciding to avoid capture or slavery). In some cases, men ...


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Gustav II Adolf of Sweden was killed in a cavalry charge, in 1632. Charles XII was killed in battle in 1718. I'm not saying he was the last monarch to see battle action. What counts here is that modern warfare already dawned. They themselves are reputed for major innovations in the way war is waged, and for building one of the most advanced armies of their ...


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He stayed out because he was saving his strength for taking over Japan. Right after the Korean war finished he staged a coup and took control from Hideyoshi's government. Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Sekigahara


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I think, the question is simply too broad for a definitive answer. What is a "reigning monarch" and what defines a "battle"? A friend of mine has been working as an MD at a missionary hospital in Papua New-Guinea. There are still wars between tribes and they have chieftains. Does a chieftain count as "reigning monarch" and do those conflicts count as ...


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Does this count (North Yemen)? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muhammad_al-Badr


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King Haakon VII of Norway was present in active combat zones during the German invasion of Norway in 1940. King Michael I of Romania was head of state and the official military commander in chief of Romania from 1940 to 1944, although he did not direct the fighting. In 1944 he staged an armed coup, ousting military dictator Ion Antonescu. If you consider ...


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Apperently Michael II of Romania visited the positions as well diring WWII. Whether it counts depends on what you consider participation in battle


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Nicolas II of Russia has repeatedly visited front during WWI.


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During the First World War, King Albert I of Belgium assumed personal command of the Belgian Armed Forces. He wasn't just visiting the front - he went into the fields with his troops and commanded them in the fighting, including at the pivotal Battle of the Yser. I don't know if this counts as "taking part in military actions" - it kind of depends on ...


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I seriously doubt that Maj. Erwin König, or any "German supersniper sent out to get Zaytsev" existed, let alone an effort to "remove him from history" after Zaytsev killed him. Since there cannot be proof of non-existence, you'll have to take personal reasoning: 1) Propaganda. If there had been such a "super-sniper", he'd have had his appearance in the ...



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