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See the article about Project Babylon at Wikipedia.org


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The mongols, when at their best, were unified and powerful. At the time, Russian city-states and kingships had little to no unity, and as the mongols were the top dogs of their time, they easily dispatched the little true resistance they were given. Plus, much of Russian land is plateau. The mongols were given a big boost with this as their horses and ...


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Just a couple of thoughts. Rus' internal weakness Due to disunity Russian feodal states were not capable to form a grand alliance. Kievan Rus vs Russian Empire Rus had no such territory or human resources as Russia had. Napoleon seized far bigger piece than mongols did but still was too far from the true success. Military superiority At the very least, in ...


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The Syrian conflict is a great example, in fact I can't think of a conflict with more "players" both direct and indirect. Directly though there are at least 6 different factions including the gov't, and within these factions there are even more smaller groups that keep changing allegiances based on the situation.. This BBC article is a great example of the ...


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Chinese traditional history includes a war between the Yellow Emperor and the Flame Emperor. The main battle is called the Battle of Banquan. This is supposed to be before the two of them joined forces to fight Chiyou. Tradition puts the date at sometime before the 2500 bc. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Banquan


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The Mahabharat war in Kurukshetra has been astronomically dated to 3067 BCE. Refer to the work done by B.N.Narahari Achar (Univ of Memphis). There is astronomical consistency in the text with regards to occurrences of eclipses, comet movements and lunar phases. The Mahabharat war is the oldest recorded war in history. The story of the war is recorded as the ...


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Well, the Menorah was seen later (according to one testimony): Most likely, the menorah was looted by the Vandals in the sacking of Rome in 455 CE, and taken to their capital, Carthage. The Byzantine army under General Belisarius might have removed it in 533 and brought it to Constantinople. According to Procopius, it was carried through the ...


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UK you see was prepared for the ravages of the incoming war. Proper policymaking during war times prevented UK from the ravages the axis occupied countries experienced. UK also had an advantage of having occupied a country like India from where they supplied food to both the civilians & the soldiers however this was also the reason of massive food ...


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There wasn't a lack of food in the UK, not in the sense that people weren't getting enough to eat or were suffering malnutrition. What there was is a lack of variety of food. Anything which was imported (citrus, tropical fruits, tea, coffee, sugar), expensive (meat) or important to the war effort (fats, meat, canned anything) would be rationed. Rationing ...


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Rationing and ultimately food "shortages" are an inevitable consequence of command economies. What happens is that the government orders that certain goods must be sold at a particular prices. They do this so that THEY, meaning the government need only pay low amount to feed their soldiers. This process is contagious, because if you just fix the price of, ...


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UK, like most other developed (and not so developed) countries, does not produce all food that it consumes. Some food is imported in most cases. In the case of UK during WW2 much of the food was imported. As the war started, a) the oceans became dangerous. Because of the German cruisers and submarines. b) the shipping capacities were needed for other ...


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Winston Churchill, before fighting it: "The battle of Britain is about to begin. Upon this battle depends the survival of Christian civilisation."


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"Not willing to fight hard enough" Hard ENOUGH to do what? To win? I guess by definition you could say that if they are not willing to fight hard enough to win, then they will lose. While there have certainly been cases in recent times where one country has invaded another and then been defeated or forced to withdraw, I think the answer to your question is ...


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Hmm... Perhaps the War of the League of Augsburg / War of the Grand Alliance / Nine Years' War would count, at least with respect to the first two of those names. According to Wikipedia, The Grand Alliance was a European coalition, consisting (at various times) of Austria, Bavaria, Brandenburg, the Dutch Republic, England, the Holy Roman Empire, Ireland, ...


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One potential answer is "The People's Crusade." This certainly refers to the people fighting it (peasants instead of noblemen). I haven't found any primary source material for contemporaries calling it "The People's Crusade", but this source seems to suggest that it was called "The Popular Crusade" which is fairly close. As two sheds and Steve Jessop ...


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(1) "The Battle of France" - so called by the French. The the term "Battle of France is widely used for the WW2 fighting of the French against the German invasion. See e.g. Wikipedia Battle of France And the naming of it accordingly is attested to e.g. Winston Churchill: here ... What General Weygand has called The Battle of France is over. The ...


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two sheds already mentioned the Napoleonic Wars, which do kinda qualify(they're named after the leader of the country), AND The French Revolutionary wars(guerres de la Révolution française in French) are a perfect example for what you're asking. They're named after the... we can say faction or political entity, that caused and won most of them, and are ...


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Naming a war after the leader of our side (especially if he wants to be remembered for the victory, even anticipated) like in "Napoleonic Wars" as referenced by two sheds seems to be the most natural case of naming the war after one's side. In Clone Wars it's a different case: naming the war after a key or new weapon. I don't know about any war named like ...


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There have been at least a few wars with more than two opposing factions. Algerian War: Opponents: Algerians aligned with one of two liberation movements ("National Liberation Front"; "Algerian National Movement") French government forces Two irregular forces ("French Algerian Front"; "Organization of the Secret Army") Northern Ireland's Troubles: ...


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Surely an obvious example is the American Revolution? And likewise for many other revolutions.


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I can think of an example of this from the ancient period: The Lamian War(323–322 BC): was known to the ancient Greeks as the "Hellenic War". Obviously there were many wars in ancient Greece that we could call "Hellenic Wars" but this particular one was explicitly noted by Diodorus Siculus as such. Independent Greek states fought on both sides of this ...


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One example that comes to my mind is the War of the Triple Alliance, perhaps more commonly known as the Paraguayan War, which was won by the said Triple Alliance (Brazil, Argentina and Uruguay). EDIT – But to be honest, I don't actually know nor could I find out whether it was called like that while it was being fought; it's pretty probable that it was ...


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The Austro-Prussian War is currently known in Germany as "Deutscher Krieg", or "The German War" - though it was originally known as "Preußisch-Deutscher Krieg", or "Prussian-German War". Another contender are the Napoleonic Wars--or the Guerres napoléoniennes, as they are called in France.



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