Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

There were some plans like the Amerika Bomber (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amerika_Bomber) that also could be used to deliver an atomic bomb. There was also plans to launch bombers from the Azores. There were also plans for V2 rockets launched from U-boats.


3

A very thought provoking Question; from checking on various sources on the internet the bayonet was used about 10 to 20 years before 1700. The earliest being plug bayonets, which had serious drawbacks, primary of which was that they were difficult to extract from the gun after use. The ring bayonet came in to use about 1700, but of a simple type that was not ...


5

@Felix's answer is the key, but there is also the secondary fact that medieval warfare tended to be more highly specialized than the classical. The increased emphasis on heavy cavalry meant a lot more emphasis on a very 'expensive' form of soldiers: ones who needed more training, supplies and support staff than either barbarian tribal levies or big masses of ...


0

Basically, the issue was that if the German fleet could get the "first wave" across the Channel, would the Germans be able to reinforce/resupply adequately to defeat the British. As William L. Shirer pointed out in "The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich," the German navy expected to lose every ship, in a cross-channel landing. That's both war- and ...


2

Hitler's best chance was to conquer the "rest of the world" outside of the Americas, which he and Japan had the power to do, absent vigorous American intervention. The plan would be to conquer what I call the Euro-As-Af land mass. Put another way, Hitler had to deprive America of a "critical mass" of world power. In both my unpublished book, Axis ...


8

Hitler's expectation, which was initially correct, was that the United States would not enter the war. In fact, he didn't even think Britain would declare war on Germany. When it did, he reportedly was deeply shocked. The main "plan", if you can call it that, was what was called "fortress Europe". The idea that once united, the nations of Europe would be ...


5

The Wikipedia article is quite extensive, but the salient points are these: The British army and militia were under-strength in 1940 but with exceptionally short supplies lines and tank production matching then eventually exceeding German production. The British were perfectly willing to gas any invaders and had stockpiles prepared in advance (the British ...


4

My comment above, as in pictures of thousands of pillboxes, was too flippant. Your question deserves a more serious answer. There are two key things to consider, I think, when answering your question. One is that that the defence of the British Isles depended utterly on the Royal Navy. The Battle of Britain, considered pivotal in Britain's defence against ...


8

No, Hitler had no plan for defeating the US outright. However, the Germans had been fighting against the US for quite some time in the Battle of the Atlantic, since US escorts would take convoys partway across and defend them against U-Boats. So the US neutrality was very strained already. And when the US entered the war, the Germans at once sent U-Boats ...


2

Churchill always maintained publicly that, worst case, their government would retreat to its colonies (most likely Canada) and try to fight on from there. For example, there is this often overlooked coda to his Fight them on the beaches speech: ... and if, which I do not for a moment believe, this island or a large part of it were subjugated and ...


5

I like to visit old castles and am lucky enough to live where there are quite a few. If the old gate is still there you can see it was often covered in sheet metal. Some castles has skins stretched over the gates and would wet them to stop them catching fire. The doors were often set back inside the doorway so it wasn't easy to shoot at them. Fire arrows ...


12

Short answer is, they weren't, not specifically. The siege of Sion (the castle in Bohemia) is thought to have been decided by the gatehouse being burned down, but there the entire gatehouse structure was wooden rather than just the gate itself, and it took several months of bombarding the entire castle with fire arrows. In general, protecting your gate from ...


9

This seems more like a technical question than a historical one, but anyway, "splash some oil and throw a torch" will not burn down a large door or any large piece of wood for that matter. Starting a fire requires a certain amount of heat, so you need a large mass of flammable tinder to get something started. The larger the door, the more tinder you will ...


0

I'm drawing my answer from comments on this and the linked question, and from my recollection of other events. I don't know whether the introduction of the bayonet was decisive on the predominance of the musket, but I know that it was a "game changer." First, users of missile weapons without bayonets were vulnerable to charges on open ground by soldiers ...


5

This is a garbled account of the attack that began the Yom Kippur War, or the October War, between Israel and an alliance of Syria and Egypt. The latter launched an attack on Israel (to recover Egyptian and Syrian territory previously occupied by Israel) on Yom Kippur, the most solemn of Jewish holidays, when the whole country grinds to a halt. Jewish law ...



Top 50 recent answers are included