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7

When it comes to tank numbers, and even many models - absolutely the French had superiority. However, the problem was primarily doctrinal. Where the Germans concentrated their armour in large motorised formations, designed to strike the enemies centre of gravity, the French dispersed their armour at the battalion level, so it could never really achieve the ...


0

The wikipedia article on the Battle for France should answer most of your questions. Due to restrictions imposed by the Treaty of Versailles, budget constraints and other factors the early German tanks were really bad. They really were no more than mobile, armored machine guns. I saw one early German newsreel showing tiny "tanks" getting pulled across a ...


0

Quick Answer- Early Rockets were: Inaccurate, Immobile, Ineffective. They were used before the XX century (eg. Napoleon) but very scarcely for the reasons above. The Chinese and Koreans on the other hand did use rockets before that time. For an example the ancient Korean's launchers were very effective and even managed to stop a Japanese samurai ...


2

Military knowledge like this was considered highly secret and valuable and was not originally taught in schools, but Phillip II (1556-1598) saw the strategic value of cannon and greatly expanded artillery education. Originally most ships were privately owned and kings would put together fleets only temporarily for specific purposes. For example, when ...


5

I cant answer for every country but for Britain, the move to formal education of naval gunnery officers came fairly late. The Royal Artillery College at Woolwich had been established in 1741 to train army officers in the necessary sciences. By comparison, the Royal Navy first established their gunnery school (known as HMS Excellent) as late as 1830. Brian ...


0

The most notable ones: The Ironclads. Railways as in means to support the soldiers. Regarding number 1, ironclads were invented BEFORE the CW but weren't extensively used. It was funny that Napoleon III promised to deliver a couple of Ironclads for the Confederates (the Southerners) but when they started losing battles, he quickly "forgot" his decision. ...


2

The Islamic State regularly destroys historical artefacts. Here is one from just last week. Here is another. It is widely suspected that they loot and smuggle a considerable portion of the content of the museums and historical sites that they destroy as well.


3

In the Korean War, the US air force destroyed the Gwanghwamun, which was the gates of the old Korean palace. More info: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gwanghwamun Aldo, the Yongmyongsa Temple in pyongyang was destroyed by carpet bombing. Link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yongmyongsa


3

I am surprised that nobody mentions the example which is going on just now: it is in the news. The "Caliphate" destroys on purpose the ancient cultural sites in Iraq. Of course most of us do not recognize the "Caliphate" as a state, so perhaps this example does not qualify. But this only shows that the question is not well posed: what is a state?


5

Wàn Sōng Temple, China During the Second Sino-Japanese War, the Imperial Japanese Army and its Chinese puppet auxiliaries set fire to the historic Wàn Sōng Temple, lit. Temple of (Ten) Thousand Pines. The temple was the largest of its kind on Mt. Pán in Ji County, near the city of Tientsin, a famous scenic area. The temple was ancient and once home to the ...


2

This occurred at least twice in the Vietnam War. I say "at least" because these are the two instances I know of, and there could well be more. Mỹ Sơn This complex of temples was built by the Cham in the 15th Century, who (I'm told) were the original inhabitants of Vietnam until who we today consider the ethnic Vietnamese invaded and took over. Cham people ...


4

During the Soviet German war (part of the WWII) both sides deliberately destroyed cultural monuments of the other side. The Germans tried to destroy the Uspenskii cathedral, a part of the Kiev Lavra. I only have a Russian language source for this, but there are some photos: http://2000.net.ua/2000/aspekty/istorija/44243 The document mentions names and ...


5

I'm reminded of the Baedeker Raids of WW2. Baron Gustav Braun von Stumm, a spokesman for the German Foreign Office, is reported to have said on 24 April 1942 (following the first attack), "We shall go out and bomb every building in Britain marked with three stars in the Baedeker Guide", a reference to the popular travel guides of that name. ...


5

In September 1914, during the first World War the famous French Reims Cathedral was hit and heavily damaged by German shell fire. Reims Cathedral is a national monument of France, not only because of its long history and architectural beauty, but also because the French kings were crowned there. As far as I know, the German troops undoubtedly aimed for the ...


6

The Monastery of Monte Cassino. Which was made worse by the facts that: even for the attacker, there were no actual reasons for it, as the Germans were (this time) civilized and did not use the monastery as part of their defenses. it worsened the situation of the attacker. Once bombed, there was no cultural reason to declare the ruins "safe ground", and so ...


9

(This is a list question with many possible answers. Mirroring the meta proposal for references I'm making this is a community wiki - please feel free to edit to add more examples.) Wàn Sōng Temple, China - Semaphore Abbey of Monte Cassino, Italy - SJuan76 Reims Cathedral, France - gdir Various actions on the Eastern Front of WWII - Fedor Nazarov Mỹ Sơn ...


0

Two instances come to mind quickly: The bombing of Rotterdam in May, 1940, accompanied with the threat to do the same to Amsterdam and Den Hague in order to coerce a quick Dutch surrender. The destruction of the World Trade Centre Twin Towers, and attempted destruction of the Pentagon, on Sept. 11, 2001. Given Al Qaida's status in 2001 as a de facto ...


0

Ruse de guerre: In 1946, a German soldier, Heinz Hagendorf, was found guilty by a U.S. military tribunal at the Dachau Trials and sentenced to six months imprisonment for having "wrongfully used the Red Cross emblem in a combat zone by firing a weapon at American soldiers from an enemy ambulance displaying such emblem." Simulation of protected status ...


5

The relevant regulation (mainly the first) in WW1 would appear to be: Geneva Convention (1906) Article 9 of the 1906 Geneva Convention provides: The personnel charged exclusively with the removal, transportation, and treatment of the sick and wounded, as well as with the administration of sanitary formations and establishments … shall be respected and ...


0

The first cannon the Chinese had, according to the Portuguese were three (3) cannons, presumably ship cannon, manned by Portuguese crews which the emperor specifically requested of them in 1621. Three cannons are not enough to affect a war in which there are many thousands fighting over vast distances. Also, ship cannons use carriages which are not effective ...


-4

Firstly, weapon technology is difficult to research because it is usually secret and gunpowder is no exception, so most important evidence is purely indirect; you have infer the invention from other evidence, such as metallurgical evidence. Secondly the idea that gunpowder came by the "silk road" or that it originated in China, Mongolia, Arabia or other ...



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