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2

To elaborate on Patrick N's answer, the cloth is called "wadding." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wadding


-1

So again..."bolt action"...even in "auto cannon form" of the M1 Girand...another wonderful rifle...is designed first and foremost with safety in mind. In its "auto loader form" this would primarily through cast metaI fully enclosing the breach thus making it impossible for the bolt itself to be "extracted" into the users head. This weapon has excellent ...


2

Yes, it existed, but (as recoil was indeed an issue) it had to wait for some technologies to be developed. First, think of the difference of case use between the zamburak. The first was used by not industrialized nations, who were fighting enemies who could not field big numbers of "true" cannons. Against those undefended troops, the zamburak users could ...


2

A tachanka is a cart with a machine gun mounted on it. What makes you think that cannon were not mounted that way? For a cannon mounted so that the weapon and crew stand on the cart, see the Krupp Ballonabwehrkanone. And of course there were plenty of cannon where the crew would dismount from the cart to fire.


0

There's a safety reason namely should the round explode in the barrel the bolt will flip up but should remain in place forcing the blast forward and protecting the shooter. Since as WW2 showed almost no infantry ever even fired their weapon a bolt action rifle was more than sufficient. As an added bonus with a bolt action you can alway check to see if you've ...


0

Actually, several weapon systems were developed during WW1 that were not bolt action. The Pedersen Device mated to the existing M1903 Springfield rifle, the RSC Model 1917, and the ever popular Browning Automatic Rifle to name a few. I understand that the BAR was not intended to be a standard service rifle, but it does deserve a mention because of its ...


-1

In addition to the HAARP projects which are well mentioned above which achieved velocities of Mach 10 at an extraordinary altitude of 300,00 feet there is also speculations concerning a "Project Thor" which drops a tungsten rod straight down from outer space...and is perfectly legal actually. The theoretical power of such a weapon is quite spectacular.


8

Not sure about wrapping a bullet entirely, but muzzleloading firearms do generally require a patch of some kind (typically some sort of cloth or paper) between the ball and the powder. This is because the ball is made to be a slightly smaller diameter than the barrel, so it doesn't get stuck in the barrel while loading. If the gun was fired without a patch, ...


0

PBS's episode titled "Bombing Hitler's Supergun" never mentioned the Luxembourg tests. They did note that the gun was tested in occupied Poland in a proof of concept. The focus of the episode was the efforts to destroy the gun although they did a scale proof of concept with rifle barrels and rifle shells to show that they could use the hot gases to ignite ...


0

In medieval Europe it took a standard blacksmith about a week to make a decent average steel longsword. If they where making something for their lord or king they would often spend as much as 6 months ensuring they had the ornate design perfect, but that's about it. Usually a sword would take about 1-2 months to finish, not because they where spending that ...



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