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0

Saw a lot of green in '68 in the Delta and they ate a lot of red.


10

This isn't exactly an answer (yet), but for comparison, look at this aerial photograph of the damage from a conventional bombing raid over Osaka (Taken from Reports of the United States Strategic Bombing Survey It's not the same location, but the appearance of the craters, their size, the typical spacing between them etc. is very similar to the photograph ...


0

Using the above comment's source, and assuming a thatcher circa 1340 would earn 3 pence daily for 365 days a year, I believe that calculates to approx. 71 British pounds or 103 USD today. Please correct me if I'm wrong.


2

Lifting from this site, I found a "cheap sword (peasant's)", England ~1340, listed at 6 pence. The same site lists the daily wage of a thatcher (in the same time period) as 3 pence. The source is given as "Standards of Living in the Later Middle Ages, Christopher Dyer, Cambridge University Press, 1989". Probably a good source to look into. This does not ...


3

TL;DR: We don't know, but at least ~170 swords bearing - in whole or in part - some variation of "VLFBERHT" are known to exist. Number of Extant VLFBERHT swords: I came across the closest available approximation to an answer we're likely to get: The finds The number of extant sword blades with the signature Vlfberht is not known... Probably the ...


18

The official way we determine how the Constitution is "understood" is through US Supreme Court decisions, and there haven't been any on that particular subject. There have been basically 3 definitive decisions on the 2nd amendment, only one of which came before the 20th Century. Note first that prior to the 14th Amendment, the Bill of Rights was generally ...


12

Did militia companies have cannons? The answer is Yes, they did. For example, Chapter XLV Militia and Militia Companies, from The History of Detroit and Michigan: Or, The Metropolis Illustrated; a Full Record of Territorial Days in Michigan, and the Annals of Wayne County, Volume 1, by Silas Farmer (1889). The Legionary Corps, created in Michigan by an ...


12

There have been constant attempts, mostly by cities, to ban guns throughout the entire history of the United States. Nearly all of these thousands of attempts to ban guns, in one form or another, were voided by state court decisions. In some cases states have actually enacted modifications to their own state constitutions expressly making gun possession a ...


1

I believe that the point of the Second Amendment was that the "common man" would not have enough firepower to fight the "government," but would have enough to form a militia to fight other "incidental" threats. (That is, something like muskets (or rifles) but no cannon, mortars or artilllery.) Such threats could include the following: Slave revolts, such ...


-1

I believe this flows from the first phrase concerning "Militia". Militias do did not use mortars, chemical weapons, etc, so the right does not extend to those weapons. In support of this I found the following on a the site of the commander of a NJ Militia re-enactor: Cannon were considered the queens of the battlefield. Infantry unsupported by cannon ...


-3

The problem with a pole arm is that you can only kill one guy with it. If the unit with the spears outnumbers the enemy, fine, but if the enemy outnumbers you, then things will go bad. For this reason elite units always fought with sword and shield because you may need to kill many people. With a spear you can stick one of them, but if you are facing five ...


10

The Romans developed tactics that involved both swords and spears. The spears ("pilum") were used first, and were throwing spears (not "polearms"). After the "shock and awe" administered by the throwing spears, Roman soldiers would close in with short, thrusting swords to finish the job. These tactics were similar to those used by men armed with (one shot) ...


9

Pole arms vary greatly in length and purpose. Everything from a Zulu iklwa, a short 1 to 2 meter personal thrusting weapon... Source: Therion Arms International ...to the 7 meter pike favored by everyone from Philip of Macedonia to Charles the XII of Sweden. Source Swords also vary greatly from the Roman gladius, a short thrusting weapon meant to be ...



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