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9

The difficulty is that, by a suitably chosen narrow meaning of defeat: Destruction of the army in the field, loss of all conquered territory, or significant loss of hoe country areas, the German Army wasn't defeated. Here is a map that shows the Allied March to the Rhine after the Armistice; which thus shows that on Nov 11, 1918, the Germans still held all ...


5

I assume you are not interested in fairly common cases of a new country becoming independent and the old country recognising that. An example might be section 2 of the Canada Act 1982 passed by the UK parliament at the request of the Canadian government, which said No Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom passed after the Constitution Act, 1982 ...


3

Possibly. There is a mention here of "a formal Reichstag commission of enquiry . . . held by the Weimar government." The commission criticized some aspects of the stab in the back theory, but not all of it: The expression ‘stab-in-the-back’ in the oft-used sense, as if the country had attacked the victorious army in the rear and as if the war had been ...


1

Before the war, the province of Silesia was united. The League of Nation imposed autonomy of the Province of Upper Silesia within Prussia: It was separated from the Province of Lower Silesia which was almost exclusively German. A polish majority remained in almost all districts of the Upper Silesia province: Only the districts of Falkenberg, Neisse, ...


1

I've found one contemporary source in the university library but it seems to be extremely biased. It's a slim 30-pages brochure called "The Poles in Germany and the Germans in Poland" by one George Kurnatowski, a political science professor from Warsaw, published in 1927. Prof. Kurnatowski is strenuosly trying to show that the Poles in Germany are ...



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