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Possibly there is relevance to this question beyond a simple google search. In March 1920 the Kapp Putsch tried to remove the Weimar (sic) Republic. A general strike by the workers made it collapse. In the context of Weimar, a "general strike" is something like the resistance against Kapp and L├╝ttwitz.


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The enemies of the "Allies" were known as the Central Powers. This grew out of the Triple Alliance that originally included Germany, Austria-Hungary, and Italy. When war began in 1914, Italy declined to join the other two (and later became an Ally in 1915). Turkey joined Germany and Austria in 1914 because of its emnity to Russia, an Ally. Bulgaria joined ...


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ASR. Spain was behind the other powers mostly due to the civil wars that had until 1874. Later, Spain was trying to recover itself. In military investment was only before USA. However, all the Spanish made equipment didn't arrive until the early 20th century. Spain was trying to modernize its army and navy. Example of the first modern Spanish battleship ...


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"The stab in the back" hypothesis came from General Ludendorff not Hitler...and was directed at the German people not any particular ethnic group per se. Hitler turned it into "the Jews" most likely out of political convenience. Not only were many Jews at the Vanguard of Marxist/Leninism thus literally invading Poland in 1920 but also there were Jews who ...


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Compared to the aircraft of the day, Zeppelins were very long ranged, high flying, and slow but not excessively so. The payload was impressive, too. Top speed was close to 60 mph. Cruise speed was lower. Range was well over 700 miles. Some were closer to 7,000 miles. Ceiling was up to 20,000 feet. Fighter aircraft could and did intercept airships, but ...


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For what it's worth, the Wikipedia article on inverted bows notes that Inverted bows maximize the length of waterline and hence the hull speed. Inverted bows were popular on battleships and large cruisers in the early 20th century. They fell out of favour, as they were very wet on high speeds and heavy seas, but have made a comeback on modern ship design. ...


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What was the reason of C-shaped bows in 19th century and WW1? Was it the same as a ram in ancient galleys? Why did everybody expect to ram enemy's ship? Were there any successful attempts in the age of heavy naval artillery? It actually depends on which ship you are talking about from that era. In the British naval world the HMS Dreadnought actually ...


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The stab in the back idea held by Hitler, retorts to the signing of the Versailles treaty. If you listen to Benjamin Freedmon who was at Versailles, he states that 129 dignitaries from the German side were Jewish and the signatories on the actual treaty were of German-Jewish descent. Hitler vowed that his work was to destroy the treaty of Versailles in its ...


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I think this article is a very sinister form of hatred propaganda. It is sinister because it makes a statement which is virtually impossible to debunk. Consider the fact that there are many million Jews around the world. Among these you will find some that are communists, other that are capitalists, and so on. That is no different from other ethnic groups. ...


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You didn't say how long you have before the debate, but if you have the time read The Sleepwalkers: How Europe Went to War in 1914 Published in the year of the centennial of the outbreak of the war, it does an excellent job of using all the latest research on causes of the Great War, including whose fault it was and who started it. Spoilers: no, it wasn't ...



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