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8

All of the factors you mentioned did play a role in the loss of the ships. But the largest factor in the ships themselves actually blowing up was the absolute horrendousness in the ammunition handling of the battle-cruisers and basically every other British ship. To that point, the battle-cruisers also had less armour than battleships which made it easier ...


1

'A Soldier's Duty' by Rokossovsky himself doesn't contain anything about his WWI service. The general information is that he was a very brave volunteer, who joined KDP on the outbreak of the war and reached the rank of NCO through the line of some great (for a soldier) exploits - sometimes, always like 'brigadier Gerard'. According to Rokossovsky himself,...


2

This relates to the so-called Heartland Theory by people like Britain's HJ MacKinder. Whoever controls East Europe dominates the "Heartland" (which also includes Germany and Russia) of World Island (the Eurasian land mass). Whoever controls the Heartland dominates World Island. And whoever controls World Island dominates the world. Therefore, any forceful ...


0

There is a very substantial collection of Indian war posters in the Imperial War Museum collection in London. Illiteracy doesn't mean no equation at all with the world of print, and illustration.


-1

So most people look to movies when they think of War but this is the greatest lie ever told. Most War is simply the act of nothing getting done and even less happening (The Front.) World War 1 in the West is the textbook example of this...with the Battle of Virginia during the US Civil War an excellent precursor. It was quite common in the latter for Johnny ...


18

The existing answers provide detail on why side attacks and real breakthroughs were impossible in practice. I want to add a theoretic level why strategists might also wouldn't want them. To answer your question with emphasize on the "accept" part, I would like to refer you to a military theorist who foresaw some developments and is thus still taught at many ...


10

Generals tend to "fight the last war." That said, there are periods of defensive predominance that shape later periods of offensive predominance, and are shaped by earlier periods of offensive predominance. For instance,offensive cavalry ruled supreme between the invention of the stirrup, and the invention of defensive missile weapons such as the long bow ...


28

There were no "sides" where one might perform a side-attack. After the initial German push was defeated at the First Battle of the Marne, the British and French attacked the Germans at the First Battle of the Aisne. There, both the Germans and the Entente found how effective entrenching was against attacking troops. Having failed the frontal attacks and ...


55

sides got locked into relatively short lines of heavily defended trench warfare with little prospect of gains for either side. The lines on the Western Front were not by any stretch of the imagination "short". The Western Front ran all the way from Switzerland to the Atlantic Ocean. Side attacks? Well the Race to the Sea (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...


0

There's a safety reason namely should the round explode in the barrel the bolt will flip up but should remain in place forcing the blast forward and protecting the shooter. Since as WW2 showed almost no infantry ever even fired their weapon a bolt action rifle was more than sufficient. As an added bonus with a bolt action you can alway check to see if you've ...



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