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53

First of all, Japanese Forces were by no means inferior to their enemies in terms of fighting spirit or training. Beyond a doubt, No nation in WW2 had soldiers of such fanatical devotion in her service as Japan did, who actively sought out Gyokusai (Glorious death). Their mindset could be explained in Japanese martial song, Umi Yukaba: If I go away to ...


33

To narrow down this answer, I'm going to pick June - August 1944 to highlight the differences. The Western Front is mired in the Normandy bocage and the Eastern Front is fighting on the open steppes of Ukraine and Poland. These two pictures sum it all up. Normandy bocage. Source Ukrainian Steppe. As you can see, one is very hemmed in and one is very ...


22

How often were Jews barred from academic and social clubs in the early 20th century? Feynman's experience was hardly unique: At the turn of the twentieth century, quota requirements limited Jews’ matriculation in college and forced them to compete against one another for the few spots elite colleges had reserved for such students. At that time, Jewish ...


17

I wan to supplement NSNoob's answer with some more information on Japanese small arms. They lacked the firepower which the Americans could bring down, firepower which is very important in obscured and close range jungle fighting. Compared to the Chinese, their primary land opponent, the Japanese army fared fine. This is something very important to remember, ...


11

Japan had a disadvantage in heavy equipment, especially artillery and ships artillery. Many Japanese soldiers were killed in heavy bombardments. After the early battles (e.g. Guadalcanal), Japan seldom bombarded or bombed American soldiers. In some ways, the Japanese casualty rate was not that much higher than that of the Americans. If you take casualties ...


10

The first set is a Japanese 10-yen banknote issued in 1946, during Allied occupation of Japan. The second set is a one peso banknote issued in 1943 in occupied Philippines by the Japanese government. The third set is a 1 shilling Oceanian Pound banknote issued in 1942, also by the Japanese government, and intended for use in various occupied British and ...


8

To answer this question, from the outset there has to be a distinction between the German zones occupied by the Western allies and the Soviet occupied zone, i.e the parts that first became the Tri-Zone then the Federal Republic of German and the German Democratic Republic, respectively. The source I'm using is Greif zur Kamera, Kumpel!: Die Geschichte der ...


8

There's problems with that statement. The Munich Agreement was not agreed upon at "an old palace". In fact, Chamberlain and Hitler met at several locations prior to signing the agreement, none of which can be described as an "old palace". First, on September 15th, at Berghof, Hitler's residence in the Bavarian Alps. This was hardly an "old palace", it was a ...


6

By 1944, US submarines were very experienced and had ironed out their problems with their equipment. They had been conducting an extremely successful offensive campaign against Japanese shipping since the beginning of 1942, and unlike German U-boats, had not taken heavy losses and so gained in experience. They had fixed the flaws in the Mark 14 torpedo ...


6

My uncle was a Marine in these battles. His generation spoke very little about the war. He was in the Pacific. One day we were discussing wars. He turned to me and said, "You know we did not take prisoners...". There were many reasons for this. 1) There was no place to put or hold prisoners. 2) You had to be constantly on alert with Japanese prisoners since ...


6

I'll try to explain briefly the big picture, because the full answer would be book length. So this answer is simplified and designed to give you a good idea about where to keep learning. The Nazis had a concept of Scientific racism. This led them to define the "Jewish problem" and to therefore define Jews as sub-humans. They then created the ...


6

British and American POW's were treated as POW's. Soviet Jewish POW's were usually treated as Jews, if their national origin could be determined. The justification was that Soviet Union did not sign the international convention about POW's. Of course, this was the official point of view, but actual treatment depended on commanders in the field. Official ...


6

Germany did not have strategic bombers (in the sense of this word that was used in Britain and US): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_World_War_II_military_aircraft_of_Germany Strategic bombing of Soviet union was never attempted. In 1941-42 the Soviets managed to move most of their industry from the West of the country to the regions in the East, ...


6

Sapp, F. Gefangen in Stalingrad (1943 bis 1946). — Steyr: Ennsthaler, 1998. This satisfies your criteria completely, except that the soldier is Austrian. Fritzsche K. Das Ziel - überleben: Sechs Jahre hinter Stacheldraht. — Zweibrücken VDM Heinz Nickel, 2002. This guy is German who spent 6 years in captivity, not a "simple soldier", but a pilot, leutenant. ...


5

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Kohima Meanwhile, the commander of the British Fourteenth Army, Lieutenant General William Slim, belatedly realised (partly from Japanese documents that had been captured at Sangshak) that a whole Japanese division was moving towards Kohima.[15] He and his staff had originally believed that, because of the ...


4

To add on Schwern's answer, the Allies had to modify some tanks to go through the hedges of the Norman bocage, they called these Rhino tanks. See how the front of the tank has been modified: Image source. Bulldozers or tanks modified to carry a bulldozer blade were used to open gaps in hedgerows. Some hedgerows were so thick that engineers first had ...


4

The negotiations at Munich involved a lot more than one man's smoking habit and were very long and drawn out. Ultimately, Chamberlain's willingness to allow the annexation of the Sudetenland was based on a desire for peace, not an attempt to get to a smoking room faster. It should be mentioned that close advisors to Chamberlain had informed him (rightly or ...


3

This question appears to be asking about the idea that history operates in cycles. War follows peace follows war. Prosperity follows recession follows prosperity. And so on. Many, many people have made such suggestions. These sorts of theories ignore that history is about cause and effect. Wars don't cause peace. Peace doesn't cause wars... though they can ...


3

Nazi doctrine developed in the 1920s from pre-existing anti-semitic and other racist tendencies, and placed Jews amongst the Untermensch - essentially "not quite human". The Russians were categorised with Slavs, and were also "not quite human". Western Allied people (French, British, American) fell into a category that was considered to be compatible with ...


3

Due to the low surfaced speed and even more limited speed/endurance submerged, in order for pre-modern submarines to take part in a fleet action they need to be pre-positioned on patrol lines, choke points etc likely to intercept the opposing fleet. This was Japanese doctrine for a major fleet action. In the case of the Philippine Sea the US being on the ...


3

Russian wiki (Road of life) provides extensive data with references. September-November 1941 (navigation) - about 60000 tons, about 30000 men evacuated - intense fightings, heavy bombings, building infrastructure (docks, depots, railroad etc.), bad weather (storms, early freezing - barges could go only until 10th November); pre-blockade reserves spent; ...


3

Those measurements are in meters. The area around Łaguszów is about 160 meters above sea level. I do not see the divisions of 3.4 meters to which you are referring on the map. However, in old Germany there was local land measure called the rod ("ruthe") which was highly irregular and varied from place to place and could be anywhere from 3 to 5 meters in ...


3

The Japanese conquered Singapore a much more visible, if smaller target with some 35,000 men (far fewer than the defenders). They also conquered the Philippines with a force of about 130,000 men, against mixed American-Filipino forces. That was because of two reasons. 1) the Japanese troops were better at jungle fighting than the French, British and ...


2

I'm still not sure I understand the question, but I'm going to grope around in the dark in a hopeful manner. Let's look at some examples: OP suggests WWI and WWII - despite the opinion of my daughter's teacher, I perceive these as two episodes of the same conflict driven by underlying issues of colonialism and mercantilism, influenced by changes in the ...


2

This question is extremely interesting to me. It's been part of an ancestry research project of mine. My paternal family comes from the Sudetenland, but sadly, with the recent passing of my dad late last year, the last first hand source in my family is also silent. I will try and fill in this answer over time, which might be a bit unusual of an approach. ...


2

EDIT: Wow, I did not see this was from 2012. It appeared at the top of the questions page, so I answered it. That's strange...I wonder why it was at the top of the "newest" section. I wouldn't have responded if I had seen the date. I studied this in college (History was my major). The short answer: Hitler wanted to conquer the world as quickly as ...


2

First of all the Japanese had significantly fewer submarines, by a factor of 3, than the US and the subs that they did have were for the most part smaller subs with less range and capability. The US fleet had the advantage that it mostly operated in blue water where it is much more difficult for a sub to find a target. In general, attacking warships was ...


2

During the Great Depression, arguably the most important problem was unemployment, which at its peak reached nearly 25% of the work force, or 11 million people. The start of World War II, solved that problem. By 1944-45, the U.S. armed forces reached 11-12 million in strength, roughly matching the maximum number of unemployed cited in the previous ...


2

In general, the treatment of Jewish POWs was at the "low end" of what it was for others of their "nationality." POWs who were Soviet Jews were treated very badly--because they were Soviets. Things were a bit worse for men who were both Soviets and Jews, but it was basically "Soviet" that determined their treatment. POWs who were American or British were ...


2

Although one could consider the Blitz to be strategic bombing, the fact remains that the bombers used by Germany were mainly two-engine aircraft with smaller bomb payloads (He-111 carried 2000kg, a B-17 2700kg, the B-24 3600kg, and the B-29 9000kg). Next, compared with the Allies, the Germans produced many fewer. Wiki gives about 6500 He-111, vs 19500 B-24s ...



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