New answers tagged

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One thing you might consider is finding someone's memoirs of their experience in the camp, and presenting a small bit of that. I say this because the author of Becoming Evil: How Ordinary People Commit Genocide and Mass Killing was worried his material was too dry and antiseptic given the topic*, and that's roughly how he handled it. Pretty much every ...


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Another possibility. There was a South Atlantic Air Ferry route/Central African Air Ferry route that sent lend-lease aircraft, to, among other places, North Africa (it supplied lend-lease aircraft to the RAF in the Western Desert Campaign, so I'm guessing that some of these were used in the second battle of El-Alamein.) In general, the South Atlantic route ...


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I think I'd focus on German Uboat actions during WW2 as they had wide latitude to travel places and influence events. The Luftwaffe was engaged more fully than any Air Force in History pretty much everywhere so these "flights of fancy" are interesting anecdotally "they're not where the action was." that would be France, Great Britain and ultimately trying to ...


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Lots of supplies were from the US lend-lease, but the most visible was tanks, lots of them. Of the over 1000 tanks available to the British for the battle, half were from the US. 170 M3 Grant medium tanks 252 M4 Sherman medium tanks 119 M3 Stuart light tanks Source This gave the British not only a 2:1 quantitative advantage, but also a qualitative one. ...


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According to this document. Painted Out Stars In the dust and confusion of battle the US star could be mistaken for a German Cross at long range (greater then 1000 yards). Tank ers and armored units began painting out the stars to avoid becoming a casualty of ‘friendly fire’. The addition of the circle around the star helped to resolve this ...


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A book on the Sherman tank mentions a couple things that might account for this. Some of the tanks that were operating in heavily wooded areas were adding paint over the olive drab to help camouflage the vehicle when in the woodline. Also as the comment above mentions, the tankers 'cleaned up' the star symbol which aided the Allied aircraft in identifying ...


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I have 2 of my father's pictures from his service in the Royal Navy in WW2-they are identical to this and it is HMS Lysander-fleet minesweeper.


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According to this concerning lend-lease Sherman Tanks in North Africa, The first Shermans to see battle were M4A1s with the British Eighth Army at the Second Battle of El Alamein in October 1942. The tanks had been supplied in a hurry from the US which had removed them from their own units. They were then modified to British requirements and for ...


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According to Van Manstein and Admiral Raeder who both advised Hitler to attack Great Britain immediately after crushing France in 6 weeks "they were amazed to observe that Hitler thought Great Britain was his Ally." So that ended any attempt at formally invading Great Britain...probably the only time Nazi Germany's staff was in a hurry to attack and Hitler ...


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In addition to the points already raised by @TomAu and @DevSolar... The Pacific lend-lease route skirted the problem by officially being handled by the Soviets. Supervision and routing was handled by the Soviets. Cargo was loaded into Soviet flagged ships, many US ships were handed over to the Soviets. Since ships on the route might be inspected by the ...


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Good comments here. Absolutely agree with the comment that in the East "range was King" because indeed most of Russia is bad tank country....the one exception was the Kuban Steppe which the Nazi's failed to capitalize on. In the West the Sherman was King because most of the Western action occurred in small towns and Cities where you needed to have a small ...


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The destruction of Sevatstapol was the Germany military's first great blunder "relatively speaking" in World War 2. First off, Manstein had annihilated a massive Red Army counteroffensive on the Kerch Strait, which was perhaps the German Army's greatest victory in the East. However, he either failed to convince Hitler or just was a moron by not demanding ...


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When the Soviet Union collapsed it was revealed that the Stavka had ordered a general retreat after the failed Red Army Spring Offensive of 1942 so my personal view is not only could the Wehrmacht have defeated the Red Army in the summer of 1942 but in fact they SHOULD have defeated the Red Army with Case Blue. There are a multitude of reasons why this ...


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Japan had a five year non-Aggression Pact with the Soviet Union (which the Soviets broke in 1945 after four years). Attacking Russian shipping would have been an act of war, and Japan didn't really want or need a "third" enemy. Japan feared that the Americans would use Soviet territory to launch air strikes or "stage" an invasion if it provoked Russia ...


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Why should they? Destroying those supplies would require the commitment of forces Japan did not have to spare, with little to show for it. If a country Japan was at war with -- the USA -- insists on shipping war supplies to a country Japan was not at war with, why should Japan mind? Whether those supplies reached Russia or not did not make a difference ...


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Unit: Fliegerführer Irak (Flyer Command Iraq) Luftwaffe was not stationed in Syria but they were close nearby in Greek islands. Also, Luftwaffe did not play a role in British invasion of Vichy Possessions in Syria and Lebanon, codenamed Operation Exporter. The force in question was located and operating in Iraq. However it is true that Luftwaffe units and ...


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When I look at what the shipping miracles the Allies managed during WWII, such as the Persian Corridor, I'm inclined to say yes, they would have made it work somehow. Even had Operation FS been a success, there was still a supply line from the US west coast to Victoria (SE Australia). Ships would have to take an increasingly southern route to avoid Japanese ...


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"Why is the Moon made of Green cheese ?" This is the same type of question. Soviet Union did take everything it could from Germany. Including whole factories, machine tools, documentation, and specialists. (Most of the specialists were released and returned in 1950s). On a very large scale. As a child I lived in Soviet Union and had some opportunities to ...


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hitler never intended to enter a war of attrition with the soviets,he knew their resources and manpower were too much for the reich.it became clear to hitler in his speech to the reichstag (on youtube) that stalin was riding roughshod over the ribentrop/molotov agreement by going to war in finland,annexing baltic states and the final straw was invading ...


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Japan did not conquer Vietnam, it had already been conquered by the French. For most of the war Japan left the existing French colonial government in place and negotiated the rights to station troops there and move them through the country. Initially, Japan was only interested in Northern Indochina to cut off supplies to China. To this end they signed an ...


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what is not cosidered here are when hitler came to power in 33,he asked the worlds leading powers that if they thought that german armed forces of 100 000 soldiers and no air force allowed peace to be maintained,then why dont all the world powers reduce their armed forces tothe same levels,then peace be assured.only after being rebuffed several times by the ...


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Agreements are worth nothing unless the other government officials and the general population are willing to abide by them. In the case of the Munich agreements most of the British and French population were more or less willing to go along with them. If they hadn't been more or less accepting of them there would have been massive protests against them and ...


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I live in Plzeň and I am located in Plzeň and I assure you that no sensible force has ever considered Plzeň to be a town in the Sudetenland. The Sudetenland has two approximately but not completely equivalent definitions: the mountain ranges along the border of the Czech lands (you may see the nearly circular border of Bohemia from the satellites – which ...


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There's problems with that statement. The Munich Agreement was not agreed upon at "an old palace". In fact, Chamberlain and Hitler met at several locations prior to signing the agreement, none of which can be described as an "old palace". First, on September 15th, at Berghof, Hitler's residence in the Bavarian Alps. This was hardly an "old palace", it was a ...


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EDIT: Wow, I did not see this was from 2012. It appeared at the top of the questions page, so I answered it. That's strange...I wonder why it was at the top of the "newest" section. I wouldn't have responded if I had seen the date. I studied this in college (History was my major). The short answer: Hitler wanted to conquer the world as quickly as ...


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The Japanese conquered Singapore a much more visible, if smaller target with some 35,000 men (far fewer than the defenders). They also conquered the Philippines with a force of about 130,000 men, against mixed American-Filipino forces. That was because of two reasons. 1) the Japanese troops were better at jungle fighting than the French, British and ...


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Try "After Stalingrad: Seven years as a prisoner of war" by Adelbert Holl, Pen & Sword Military, 2016.


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These three maps clearly outline, in varying level of detail, the portions of Czechoslovakia that were annexed by Nazi Germany in 1938. As the definition of "Sudetenland" has almost no meaning apart from this annexation, they comprise a de facto meaning of the term. As illustrated below, the city of Plzen was just outside the boundaries of Sudetenland as ...


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This question is extremely interesting to me. It's been part of an ancestry research project of mine. My paternal family comes from the Sudetenland, but sadly, with the recent passing of my dad late last year, the last first hand source in my family is also silent. I will try and fill in this answer over time, which might be a bit unusual of an approach. ...


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Sapp, F. Gefangen in Stalingrad (1943 bis 1946). — Steyr: Ennsthaler, 1998. This satisfies your criteria completely, except that the soldier is Austrian. Fritzsche K. Das Ziel - überleben: Sechs Jahre hinter Stacheldraht. — Zweibrücken VDM Heinz Nickel, 2002. This guy is German who spent 6 years in captivity, not a "simple soldier", but a pilot, leutenant. ...


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In general, the treatment of Jewish POWs was at the "low end" of what it was for others of their "nationality." POWs who were Soviet Jews were treated very badly--because they were Soviets. Things were a bit worse for men who were both Soviets and Jews, but it was basically "Soviet" that determined their treatment. POWs who were American or British were ...


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To answer this question, from the outset there has to be a distinction between the German zones occupied by the Western allies and the Soviet occupied zone, i.e the parts that first became the Tri-Zone then the Federal Republic of German and the German Democratic Republic, respectively. The source I'm using is Greif zur Kamera, Kumpel!: Die Geschichte der ...


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William L. Shirer in the "Rise and Fall of the Third Reich" and Walter Kerr in "The Secret of Stalingrad" allege that Germany military intelligence underestimated the available 1942 Soviet troop strength by 1-2 million men. The problem is we don't have reliable information about Red Army's strength even now. So how to say whether German intelligence's ...


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I'd like to add this as "anecdotal" answer, not as definite but as additional data point: In some cases entire new towns were created, especially for the "ethnically cleansed" as they're now called. Meaning the refugees and those driven from their original homes in Silesia and the Sudetenland, which fell to Poland and Czechia, respectively. One such town ...


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The Jewish POWs of Western nations were separated from other POWs, moved to a separate camp at Berga and assigned more hard work. In about 2 months in one camp where the Jews were assigned mining works, 20% of them perished. This is compared to 2% of death rate among non-Jewish POWs. Fortunately to the imprisoned Jews, the war soon came to the end, so only ...


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British and American POW's were treated as POW's. Soviet Jewish POW's were usually treated as Jews, if their national origin could be determined. The justification was that Soviet Union did not sign the international convention about POW's. Of course, this was the official point of view, but actual treatment depended on commanders in the field. Official ...


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As NSNoob has stated, the Japanese did do very individually, and in small groups when barely adequately supplied. Their land forces normally did so well that their reputation alone took Okinawa and the Philippines at the start of the war. In fact, the fighting soldier is the last link in a long supply chain (logistics), involving the entire industrial ...


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Although one could consider the Blitz to be strategic bombing, the fact remains that the bombers used by Germany were mainly two-engine aircraft with smaller bomb payloads (He-111 carried 2000kg, a B-17 2700kg, the B-24 3600kg, and the B-29 9000kg). Next, compared with the Allies, the Germans produced many fewer. Wiki gives about 6500 He-111, vs 19500 B-24s ...


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Nazi doctrine developed in the 1920s from pre-existing anti-semitic and other racist tendencies, and placed Jews amongst the Untermensch - essentially "not quite human". The Russians were categorised with Slavs, and were also "not quite human". Western Allied people (French, British, American) fell into a category that was considered to be compatible with ...


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Japan had a disadvantage in heavy equipment, especially artillery and ships artillery. Many Japanese soldiers were killed in heavy bombardments. After the early battles (e.g. Guadalcanal), Japan seldom bombarded or bombed American soldiers. In some ways, the Japanese casualty rate was not that much higher than that of the Americans. If you take casualties ...


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I wan to supplement NSNoob's answer with some more information on Japanese small arms. They lacked the firepower which the Americans could bring down, firepower which is very important in obscured and close range jungle fighting. Compared to the Chinese, their primary land opponent, the Japanese army fared fine. This is something very important to remember, ...


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My uncle was a Marine in these battles. His generation spoke very little about the war. He was in the Pacific. One day we were discussing wars. He turned to me and said, "You know we did not take prisoners...". There were many reasons for this. 1) There was no place to put or hold prisoners. 2) You had to be constantly on alert with Japanese prisoners since ...



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