Tag Info

New answers tagged

4

I assume you are not interested in fairly common cases of a new country becoming independent and the old country recognising that. An example might be section 2 of the Canada Act 1982 passed by the UK parliament at the request of the Canadian government, which said No Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom passed after the Constitution Act, 1982 ...


-1

Well the famous "scrap of paper" Treaty that Great Britain had with Belgium that brought them into WWI assured the independence and neutrality of Belgium and Luxembourg against all comers.


-1

One answer could be the Pakistan India war of 1971. Bangladesh became Independent. I'm fairly confident that there would have been a clause in the Similar agreement agreeing that Pakistan would not annex Bangladesh in the future, although I realize this would be difficult. This is probably the case whenever a land gains independence. Other examples might ...


3

Austria had annexed Bosnia-Hercegovina in 1908, and was looking to swallow Serbia next. It is in this context that the ultimatum be understood. The Austrian ultimatum not only demanded that Serbia allow her to prosecute the perpetrators of the assassination, but help Austria find and punish officials that may have helped them. It went much further by asking ...


11

Short answer: points 4-6 were unreasonable to the point of being unacceptable, because they gave Vienna so much power over Serbia that it amounted to a forfeiture of Serbian independence. This isn't unique to the time period or Serbia. Countries generally are not happy to subjugate themselves to a hated enemy. Whether they could afford to resist is another ...


2

The main reason the demands were unreasonable is that A-H wanted to force the issue with Serbia in order to end the troubles with their disaffected minorities in the neighboring districts. Getting an 'attaboy' support blank check from Germany helped stoke the fire. Serbia actually accepted virtually all the unreasonable demands, if not all of them. But ...


3

British Cavalry was surprising successful on the occasions it was employed by local commanders in small scale attacks exploiting gaps in the German defensive lines after the Germans had withdrawn to the Hindenburg Line from late 1916 onwards. Despite what many ill-informed commentators say, many citing quite erronous accounts by eye-witnesses who get the ...


1

During the Napoleonic wars Napoleon granted Poland a level of autonomy (duchy of warsaw) but it was still a puppet state of the French Empire. Many Poles backed Napoleon, up to 100,000 Poles served in the Grand Armee and King Poniatowski's nephew, Jozef Poniatowski even became a marshal of France. However after the fall of Napoleon the Grand duchy of warsaw, ...


4

This is only a partial answer: Even when conscription wasn't a factor there was enormous social pressure to enlist. Those who refused were accused of cowardice. See for example the Order of the White Feather, a movement of civilian woman, often young and attractive, who were encouraged to present a white feather to any man of fighting age seen in public not ...


8

In both France and Germany there was mandatory conscription, so both countries had as large an army as they could afford. It was a crime to fail to enlist if you were ballotted into the army. Both countries publicly glorified the army and soldiers as patriotic entities. Also, the pay was better than many starter jobs available to young men at that time. ...


2

Every nation had its own "pet peeve" which had to be addressed. France: Alsace-Lorraine and redress of humiliation of Franco-Prussian War Germany: the great nation is being cheated out of colonies! Austria-Hungary: the great nation is being insulted by a Balkan upstart Russia: Pan-Slavism, the Straits Britain: the Hunns are threatening the civilization ...



Top 50 recent answers are included