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The quotation below comes from A Short Story of Arab Peoples by J.B. Glubb, 1969, page 275. The book say nothing about direct actions against both British or the Turks. When the Turkish Empire entered the First World War, Ibn Rasheed declared his support for the sultan, while Ibn Saud asked for help from the British government in India. Captain W.H.I ...


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On August 31, 1918, President Wilson wrote a letter to Rabbi Stephen Samuel Wise which referred to the Balfour Declaration and said in part: I welcome an opportunity to express the satisfaction I have felt in the progress of the Zionist movement in the United States... This letter was published a few days later, September 5th, 1918, in the New York ...


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I don't have any documentation around the specific case of Capt Beck, but if not literally true may well be "based in fact" as there are documented examples of officers carrying odd things into battle. Examples from WW2 include Major Tatham-Warter and his umbrella and Jack Churchill and his sword and longbow. More generally, the "typical" armament of an ...


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The object shown in the movie is a regular walking stick with hooked head and a metal point. It was likely an idiosyncrasy of the man, and used to project some normalcy during the madness of war. While possibly used as a weapon it is far more likely to have been a moral prop, as was not uncommon for British army officers. I could not find a reference that ...


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Possibly. There is a mention here of "a formal Reichstag commission of enquiry . . . held by the Weimar government." The commission criticized some aspects of the stab in the back theory, but not all of it: The expression ‘stab-in-the-back’ in the oft-used sense, as if the country had attacked the victorious army in the rear and as if the war had been ...



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