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11

In researching the HMS Dorsetshire I came across a reference to "The Ship That Sank Herself" which lead to an article on ships that torpedoed themselves which includes the British light cruiser HMS Trinidad. HMS Trinidad was taking part in Arctic convoy duty in 1942 when she engaged the German destroyer Z-26. Although she sank the destroyer, one of the ...


11

In the Battle of Savo Island the Japanese cruisers repeatedly hit US and Australian ships with torpedoes. There was only 1 destroyer present versus 7 cruisers, and it is likely that most if not all of the torpedo hits that sunk 3 cruisers and led to another being scuttled were from the cruisers. Certainly the US Navy credited to them. Also: The British ...


6

Most of them were shipped back to France within the week. The Battle of France was not quite over and the Dunkirk evacuees were still French military. Most French evacuees from Dunkirk had elected to be returned to the fight; the British troops had gone home to be re-equipped. - Williams, Andrew. France, Britain and the United States in the ...


5

Because they were not "better" or "more effective". There are generally poor reports of the People's Liberation Army's effectiveness against Japan during World War II. - Elleman, Bruce A. Modern Chinese Warfare, 1795-1989. Routledge, 2005. Keep in mind that comparisons are difficult to make because the Nationalists[1] bore the brunt[2] of all ...


5

The Rodney actually fired torpedoes at the Bismarck during their battle, but missed. The torpedoes carried by Rodney & Nelson (a very unusual class of BB - all 3 primary turrets were fore and none were aft, they were the first to be designed specifically for the Naval Treaty limitaations, and they were the last battleships to be armed with torpedoes at ...


5

Kantai Kessen (a variant of the Manhanian Doctrine) meant holding a solid perimeter of locations such as the Caroline islands, Marshall islands, Mariana Islands and Palau; and to wait for the enemy force to attack Japan. Having already suffered the effects of attrition from the Japanese perimeter the enemy force would be annihilated ending their threat in ...


3

I recommend that anyone interested in this issue read Adam Tooze's "Wages of Destruction". This book is on the economic aspects of the 3rd Riech, from the economic history before the 3rd Reich, to how it conducted the war. But the book also engages in other aspects of German conduct of the war, including tactical and strategic reasons for this and that. ...


2

Encryption can very well be done on quite small portable devices, also during WWII. The famous German Enigma machine was about as large as a type-writer, and that was one of the most advanced and complex encryption of the time. Smaller machines with simpler encryption also existed. However, encrypted communications required a separate radio person who does ...


2

I think it's safe to conclude that no fighter plane radios were encrypted, due to requiring extremely bulky computers at the time. Communication between enemy fighters was theoretically possible, since all you need to do is tune in to the enemy's frequency, but most planes could only use a very limited set of preset frequencies. Of course this does mean ...


2

If we look at WWII from the point of view of resources, we can somewhat justify Hitler's move of invading the Soviet Union even while being engaged in war with the United Kingdom. Invading the Soviet Union was part of the Hunger Plan. Hitler was always demanding 'lesenbraum' or living space. In this context, greater living space meant bringing more land ...


2

The 10th PZ Division was under orders from Berlin (OKW) to handover its heavy weapons and to load and leave by train by Sept 13th. So the remaining kampfgruppe Harzer (2500 men) had almost no tanks available. Contrary to the orders its halftracks of the Panzergrenadiere were not all shipped to Germany or handed over to the 9th PZ Div near Ruurlo. The 9th PZ ...


1

I looked up Ienaga's book, which seems to be generally speaking a cerdible source. However, the pages where he discusses the 8th Route army and the Communist resistance to the Japanese in general (pp. 88-96) are actually not as well-documented as the rest of the book. His main argument is basically that the Communists were so successful in their ...


1

Yes, or something like it. Most accounts have him saying it to Halifax in 1940, though he possibly repeated it on other occasions. It is sometimes reported that he said "J'assume la France" rather than "Je suis la France". In either case, the expression signified his intention to assume responsibility for France. Many of the smaller countries overrun by the ...


1

I want to compare unit for unit parity, let's say at the platoon or company level. Let's say the equivalent of a German and Soviet armored company approach each other in 1941, 1943 and 1945. Evaluating the equipment in a vacuum is not interesting. To appreciate why the Germans dominated in 1941, why they lost that dominance, and why the T-34 is ...


1

"figures vary but it is generally accepted that the Panther cost about 3 times as much as the T-34. For this reason only 6,000 Panthers entered service during the 1943-1945 period compared to 16,000 T-34s in 1943 alone!" Not only did it cost around 3x as much, but it took about 8x as many worker-hours! A very similar design to the Panther, with most of the ...


1

Woody Woodpecker was actually created in the 1930s and went through several changes before being presented to the public in his first cartoon short in 1940. His second carton, titled appropriately enough "Woody Woodpecker", had a higher level of energy and featured a jazzy musical score that apparently appealed to adult audiences. The fact that his cartoons ...



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