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1

In regards to the French government, they had been informed well in advance by their ambassador in Berlin In The Gathering Storm Churchill writes (in Chapter 20, The Soviet Enigma): From the moment when Molotov became Foreign Commissar, he pursued a policy of an arrangement with Germany at the expense of Poland. It was not very long before the ...


3

I have not seen any Soviet posters featuring the pro-German propaganda during the one-and-a-half year non-aggression pact era (October 1939 to June 1941), but undoubtedly they existed. The pro-German propaganda is well attested by many scholars. For example: The signing of the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact reversed the tone spectacularly. The word fascist ...


4

I just watched a report on TV in Germany about a book recently published "Als die Soldaten kamen" (When the soldiers came). The author researched the subject and interviewed numerous survivors all around Germany. She conservatively estimates some 860.000 women and children were being raped by the allies, the dark figure perhaps twice to three times as much ...


1

I would suggest that Western "guilt" over the A-bomb helped to gloss over Japanese atrocities,a phenomenon not limited to the USA. I grew up in post war UK, and as a child thought Germans had horns and tails, whilst I do not remember believing the same about the Japanese.


1

I've done some basic looking around and found, as you did, that numbers on this are not easy to come by. I suspect you will never find an accurate version of the numbers you want for two reasons: German-Americans often did not advertise their Germanness during the world wars, for reasons that are easy to understand. Thus any official records probably ...


2

Yes,the Red Army would have continued fighting without Baku oil. Germany could not have extracted much Baku oil - they could never have shipped it to the Reich. But they could have use demolitions and wrecked the Baku oilfields for years. But the Russians had plenty of alternative sources. Under any set of facts, the Russians had an almost unlimited source ...


4

In addition to the excellent answers, German inter-war tank designs had two technical advantages: turret layout and radios. The Panzer I and Panzer II both had the commander also operating the gun. The Germans learned that being a tank commander was a full time job: commanding the tank, scanning for targets, listening to the command radio network. With ...


5

Concerning your first question - the extent of Einsatzkommando Tunis' actions and evidence for it: The rules governing their actions were effectively identical to the rules for the Einsatzgruppen in the Soviet Union p. 138, Mallman and Cüppers. There was a meeting between Rauff and the Wehrmacht where they agreed to use Jewish forced laborers to fortify ...


3

The role of the United Nations changed significantly. The League of Nations was a rather shoddy attempt, that honestly only had one working goal: war reparations. It failed because it both didn't have the backing of nations interested in aiding it, and because it was a fairly lost cause to begin with. The United Nations, though, has existed because 1) it ...


5

First, I think the United Nations is a barely functioning body, diplomatically. It serves many worthy causes in some of its agencies, such as the World Health Organization and the World Food Program, but for its main stated purpose it isn't much of a factor. However, the UN is sort of an arbiter of last resort for the smaller powers, because its decisions ...


5

There could be multiple perspectives to looking at this, but in my opinion its the following three factors: Economic Progress and Globalization: Since WW2, most countries have been so busy in rebuilding their Economies or sustaining Growth and Development, that war never got a priority that it once used to get (like during the 1800-1900 era). Especially ...


1

Hitler was not particularly patronizing, but he definitely supported people he liked from his early life. For example, as a young man he reportedly had an affair with a French girl named Charlotte Lobjoie by whom he had a son, and she told her son that Hitler always sent her money. Hitler was kind of a loner, so he didn't have many friends when he was ...


5

This questions "asks a negative" so it is impossible to answer with absolute certainty, but I would highly doubt there was any hesitation among the air crews. The B-29 crews were all elite crews who were highly expert and highly committed to the war effort. These men had already been fire bombing Tokyo and cities in Okinawa, so I doubt they had any qualms ...


4

Contrary to Tyler Durdens Answer there were reparations after WW2. There were several agreements that covered this, the one relevant to your question is the Potsdamer Agreement. As per Wikipedias breakdown if the protocol: Reparations from Germany. This section covered reparation claims of the USSR from the Soviet occupation zone in Germany. The ...


-1

No, there were no reparations because the Allies assumed control of the government in Germany by the Berlin Declaration, therefore there was noone to pay the reparations. The Soviets considered looting to be "reparations", however, there were no "negotiations" over the looting. There was a "negotiation" in the sense that the victors decided how to divide ...


0

There are no statitics for this. Its impossible to know how many were destroyed or thrown away. But many are coming to light as inheritances. I saw an article about one such skull being put up for auction, along side other animal remains and exotic items: http://www.secretagentmarketing.com/eccentrics-eclectic-collection-goes-under-the-hammer/


1

There's clips on YouTube of the Pitmonik taken by tourists over the past few years. In them you'll see small remnants of mines, but no human remains. This isn't to say that there aren't any remains, but I was envisioning vast fields of bones from the way Dan described them in the podcast.


7

They didn't end up in any one particular place. In more recent decades, discovered skulls are generally returned to Japan, or disposed of in various ways (lack of identification). Certainly at least some would have been gotten rid of (through burial or otherwise) since WW2 was still ongoing. American authorities did not officially approve of the practise. ...


-1

The Invasion of Iceland was of a character wholly different than the German annexations and invasions of 1938-1940 and it has been justifiably left in the dustbin of history. The "invasion" was by 700 ill-equipped, ill-prepared, and very seasick British marines who walked off the ship, onto a dock and talked to the police officers waiting for them. The ...


7

The build up of the US army from a small, backwards, underfunded, isolationist peace-time army in 1939 to a six million person world conquering colossus in 1945 is one of the under-appreciated triumphs of WWII. Much can be attributed to the cadre of professional, forward thinking officers like George Marshall the US maintained. When it comes to tanks, it ...


4

There were large pockets of organized resistance in 1940, but they surrendered when their governments did. For the few governments who kept fighting, they had plenty of holdouts. The Axis powers did not surrender until 1945 when almost completely overrun, and they ordered their armies to keep fighting to the last. Many Allied powers surrendered, or were ...


0

The type VII U-Boat used at the time had a single, unprotected 88mm deck gun. The type IX had a larger 105mm gun. Their primary use was to sink unescorted merchant ships because torpedoes are expensive. While the range is listed as 12km, I have serious doubts they could hit even a large industrial target at half that range at night from the pitching deck ...


3

The loss of HMS Manchester (11,930 tons full load displacement), from the Wikipedia article of the Manchester: Sinking Manchester took part in Operation Pedestal, an operation to supply the besieged island of Malta, and which cost a number of warships, including the carrier HMS Eagle. During the operation, on 13 August, she was torpedoed and ...


0

That is possibly the accidental sinking of the attack transport USS McCawley, Read Admiral Richmond Kelly Turner's flagship for the invasion of Rendova Island on June 30, 1943, following her substantial damage by aerial attack and subsequent evacuation.


5

…actually, yes, the bone fields are still there. Especially around the Pitmonik Airfield, where balkas--eroded river banks--aren't plowed like the fields around them, and are littered with bones. I can show photos. I was there. There are still bones everywhere. You just have to slow down and look. Still, as of 1996, the Germans were allowed in to begin the ...


3

First, Barbarossa was not a unmitigated success; while the territorial gains and Soviet losses were impressive: The German plan counted on the Soviet Army collapsing in the first month of war, because they did not have logistics to keep fighting so far from their bases. In fact, in december 1941 the Russians were able to push the Germans back in Moscow. ...



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