Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

It was because there was no STRATEGIC reason for Hitler to attack Sweden. Hitler goal is to colonize Slavic lands in eastern Europe, especially Poland and Russia. He attacked Norway to keep the Allies from opening a second font in the north. He attacked Belgium because it was on the way to France. He attacked France because France didn't want let him attack ...


0

There was a quid pro quo between Sweden and Germany during World War II where Sweden exchanged a lifetime supply of meatballs to the Nazis in exchange for relative peace between their nations.


1

Sweden cooperated with Germany in World War II. (Although the Allies did manage to "launch" Eric Ericcson, a Swedish-American spy, from Sweden, in large part because Germans felt that Sweden was a potential "safe haven" for German "flight capital" by high-ranking Nazis.) My Swedish friends tell me that Sweden allowed Germany overflights to Norway during the ...


3

It is somewhat important to realize that even Hitler was not so mad as to actually consider invading all of Europe, and getting away with it. He had to consider cost vs. benefit. Hitler's target -- "the plan", as early as 1925 -- was Russia. That's where his ideological enemy was: Bolshevism. That's where his whole screwed "Lebensraum" vision played out: ...


2

Why would it seem like a much better strategic move than invading Russia? They are extremely different propositions, it seems to me. It proved true that Sweden did not need to be invaded. It continued to supply trade and needed resources (mainly iron), and not invading it had advantages such as having a neutral country nearby, which is useful for other ...


2

The issue with any treaty provision is what will you do if the side does violate it. Ideally, you would instantly spring to war. However, will your allies and your own people support this? Hitler was able to spin the 100000 man army and the limits on equipment into a straitjacket that wouldn't even let them defend themselves against their smallest ...


6

Sweden like Switzerland was a neutral country and not involved in the conflict. Attacking Sweden would have tied up military resources and it wasn't really necessary since the resources Germany needed from Sweden could be obtained by trade or diplomacy. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sweden_during_World_War_II for more information. There was also an ...


1

Northern Ireland Prime Minister Lord Craigavon had asked Churchill in 1940 to invade the Republic of Ireland at the height of the war, as he felt that Valera was coming under the influence of Hitler. Churchill did not move at that time but later prepared detailed plans for an invasion of southern Ireland. Field Marshal Montgomery stated in his ...


28

Sweden was a vital source of iron ores to Germany, an important strategic resource for her war effort. Because the allies controlled the seas, Scandinavia was Germany's main source of good quality iron. Attacking Sweden would have disrupted the supply for no real gain. Production of high-grade steel suitable for armour plate and gun barrels depended ...


17

For the same reason he did not invade Switzerland, the cost-benefit ratio was not good. Also, you should realize that the Germans were not just a bunch of frenzied madmen attacking everybody. They were happy to co-exist with other countries that were friendly, such as Sweden. After the war started, many countries, including the United States, Britain and ...


5

There is one brief mention of a woman being "very very high up in the Gestapo" in the book Frauen: German Women Recall the Third Reich. Unfortunately no specifics are mentioned and the text does not go into her role any deeper. The book Täterinnen: Frauen im Nationalsozialismus about women's roles during the NS regime mostly confirms what other answers ...


2

There were some plans like the Amerika Bomber (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amerika_Bomber) that also could be used to deliver an atomic bomb. There was also plans to launch bombers from the Azores. There were also plans for V2 rockets launched from U-boats.


1

In addition to hoping for a negotiated solution, the Allies are unprepared for war. Germany had been rearming for years, while the Allies thought they were playing catchup. They knew their industrial capacity was superior, though, not to mention strategic advantage on raw materials thanks to their colonies. That's why they were content to hold the line, and ...


-1

What exactly failed in the allied camp in 1939? Was it military intelligence? None of the above. The only question is whether the creation of the Modern State of Israel in 1948 was a meticulous Rothschild New World Order plan or the product of about 10,000 improbable chance occurrences. [9] The social cataclysmic events of two World Wars, the Holocaust and ...


5

Depending on the time frame, no one questions the SS. As the Nazi Party monopolized political power in Germany, key government functions such as law enforcement were absorbed by the [Schutzstaffel], while many SS organizations became de facto government agencies. To maintain the political power and security of the Nazi party (and later the nation), the ...


7

It is very unlikely such a thing existed. The Nazi cult assigned very specific roles to men and women. Working women in the Third Reich did exist and included not only secretaries, but even some combat roles. For example, it was found that women were much better AA gunners than men, so boom, they made every single AA gunner a woman. However, by the same ...


13

Post #6 in this thread discusses the possibility of high female gestapo agents. Apparently there isn't any evidence for them. They did find this link which proves the existence of at least one female Gestapo, but it isn't clear what her rank was.


1

Although the Spanish civil war does historically predate the Second World War, many of the participants, particularly Germany, used the Civil war as a training ground for their Army and Air force. The Spanish Civil war refugees in France were affected by France's fall to Germany, in that they were shipped to Nazi concentration camps. Wikipedia does also ...


0

In Once a Patricia, the memoir of Lt. C. Sydney Frost as platoon commander in Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry in Sicily (July-August 1943), Italy (August-September 1943 & September 1944 - March 1945), and Netherlands (March -May 1945), almost no mention of casualties is made except for the occasional "We lost so-and-so." The three exceptions ...


2

Initially the Winter War between the USSR and Finland was an unrelated conflict, as neither of the two belligerents were involved in WWII when the fighting broke out. However, it was still going on when Germany invaded the USSR, at which point Finland found themselves allied with the Nazis. You could make a case that the Second Sino-Japanese war was also ...


2

It was a bureaucratic requirement with a psychological basis that was exploited to provide a looting opportunity for American soldiers. Firstly, you have to understand that the Occupation authorities did not see peace as the complete objective. They wanted to "re-educate" the entire German population to become peaceful and non-warlike, the opposite of what ...


3

Consider the value that Allied strategists placed on the insurgent movements in Europe. While Germany occupied territories like France the Allies saw great value in providing the people with even rudimentary firearms like the FP-45. Once the position is reversed and now the Allies are acting as occupiers on foreign soil the logic would be obvious. ...


2

I was given several pieces of information in another answer that allowed me to construct my own. First, I was reminded that the typical division of 10,000 to 12,000 men has about 2,000 artillerymen. At the rate of 20 men per gun, that is about 100 guns per division. It was also helpful to learn that "most field artillery is 4-, 5- and 6-inch guns," because ...


4

The land-based regiments would have a lot more firepower. Typically you might be talking several divisions having perhaps 2000+ guns combined. Note however these are relatively small caliber compared to naval guns. Most field artillery is 4-, 5- and 6-inch guns, whereas a battleship would have 8-10 15" guns. The critical question in a fight like this is not ...


0

Basically, the issue was that if the German fleet could get the "first wave" across the Channel, would the Germans be able to reinforce/resupply adequately to defeat the British. As William L. Shirer pointed out in "The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich," the German navy expected to lose every ship, in a cross-channel landing. That's both war- and ...


2

Hitler's best chance was to conquer the "rest of the world" outside of the Americas, which he and Japan had the power to do, absent vigorous American intervention. The plan would be to conquer what I call the Euro-As-Af land mass. Put another way, Hitler had to deprive America of a "critical mass" of world power. In both my unpublished book, Axis ...


8

Hitler's expectation, which was initially correct, was that the United States would not enter the war. In fact, he didn't even think Britain would declare war on Germany. When it did, he reportedly was deeply shocked. The main "plan", if you can call it that, was what was called "fortress Europe". The idea that once united, the nations of Europe would be ...


5

The Wikipedia article is quite extensive, but the salient points are these: The British army and militia were under-strength in 1940 but with exceptionally short supplies lines and tank production matching then eventually exceeding German production. The British were perfectly willing to gas any invaders and had stockpiles prepared in advance (the British ...


4

My comment above, as in pictures of thousands of pillboxes, was too flippant. Your question deserves a more serious answer. There are two key things to consider, I think, when answering your question. One is that that the defence of the British Isles depended utterly on the Royal Navy. The Battle of Britain, considered pivotal in Britain's defence against ...


8

No, Hitler had no plan for defeating the US outright. However, the Germans had been fighting against the US for quite some time in the Battle of the Atlantic, since US escorts would take convoys partway across and defend them against U-Boats. So the US neutrality was very strained already. And when the US entered the war, the Germans at once sent U-Boats ...


2

Churchill always maintained publicly that, worst case, their government would retreat to its colonies (most likely Canada) and try to fight on from there. For example, there is this often overlooked coda to his Fight them on the beaches speech: ... and if, which I do not for a moment believe, this island or a large part of it were subjugated and ...


2

In World War I all nations learned that poison gas basically added nothing to military actions, not even higher casualties once everyone got out their masks and protective gear. Artillery did better at inflicting damage just shooting high explosive shells. In between the wars use of gas was banned, and most nations complied. In World War II, every nation ...


5

In 1989 Rudibert Kunz (a journalist known for his work about chemical warfare) and military historian Rolf-Dieter Müller published an article about this question in the german newspaper Die Zeit (the article is available online). I found this via Google and was a bit surprised. Like many people I had believed in the story that Hitler did not want to use gas ...


2

This reminds of an American army "training" film I was shown in high school (!), which was an anti-axis propaganda piece. At the end of the film they showed three portraits, that of Hitler, Mussolini and Hirohito, while the narrator intoned, "If you see any of these men, doooooooon't hesitate!" I think you can safely assume that if Hitler had been captured ...


5

Albert Speer's book "Inside the Third Reich" describes Hitler's nature and personality in detail. Speer was a close friend of Hitler from an early point and knew him well. He describes him as being in person a typical middle class Austrian bumpkin with tastes to match. Hitler had various odd predilections, which Speer describes in detail. For example he was ...


0

Here are the numbers and no speculations. The share of lend-lease supplies to the total number of produced and delivered to the USSR products - 12% - tanks 8% - Self-propelled gun 12% - Airplanes 3% - Guns and mortars 22% - Ships 63% - Cars 1% - Firearms 3% - Gasoline 40% - Aviation petrol 35% - Rails 72% - Locomotives 35% - Explosives ...


0

The bombing of Japan was a warning to the USSR. The allies knew that Japan would surrender at the drop of a hat without a fight as the had actually asked to be allowed to surrender ten times before the first bomb was dropped. The official reason for denying them a surrender was that they had placed various requirements on the surrender but in actual fact ...


1

According to a recent study commissioned by the German Finance Ministry, looting of German Jewish wealth amounted to 120 billion reich marks and financed about 1/3 of the expenditure of the German armed forces during WWII. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/germany/8119805/Confiscated-Jewish-wealth-helped-fund-the-German-war-effort.html


1

I worked with a woman whose husband was a German Jewish WWI veteran. He had been wounded in combat and received his pension from Germany every month during WWII.


4

Actually, Portugal and England have the longest alliance in the world -- one signed in the Treaty of Windsor (1386). The Portuguese and English agreed that neutrality for Portugal was the most viable stance though Portugal helped the alliance in other ways like evacuating civilians from Gilbraltar to Madeira and allowing later in the war, bases in the ...



Top 50 recent answers are included