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1

There is a famous book/movie, "Run Silent, Run Deep", which involves a submarine duel based loosely on real events. Submarines can and will hunt and kill each other. In WWII torpedoes did not have active seekers, but relied on contact fusing, which means you would have to set the depth of the torpedo and make a direct hit. This would be very difficult to do ...


0

I think the answer is no, and in any case there are a variety of material and strategic factors, like a set of common enemies, that would make it hard to say that ideology was a driving force in the alliance between Germany and Japan. Asking as someone from the US, you also have to keep in mind that our perspective is biased. It's easy to focus on the ...


0

I think he was only partially right and this is because the units transferred were SS units. In the east, the SS fought both its racial and ideological enemies (the Bolshevik Jewry; which was mostly propaganda, but people believed it). There it was in its element, both as regards the savagery of fighting and the atrocities inflicted on the civilian ...


5

One answer would be that a military "contingency plan" of sorts was written into Fall Weiß itself - the operational plan for the invasion of Poland was written so as to begin no later than September 1st, 1939. However, it is probably very unlikely that the invasion of Poland would have been canceled if Treaty of Non-aggression hadn't been signed prior to ...


1

Hitler was not in the practice of making "detailed contingency plans". He was more of "failure is not an option" type guy. If you read Speer's book, "Inside the Third Reich" you will find that it makes clear Hitler considered the pact with the Soviet Union an essential precursor to attacking Poland. The strategic situation demanded this for several reasons. ...


4

It's hard to not include possibly biased views or controversial arguments when answering such a question. But considering the vague nature of the question, there will be no definite answer anyhow. Apart from the fact that one can not give a strict definition of the term "superpower", there is no single chain of causalities between a global event like WWII ...


0

No, I think that the USA would have been a very powerful nation if the war had not happened because the factors that caused America being a superpower would have existed whether or not the war did. These factors could be its large population and landmass (US's landmass is far larger than Britain's, France's and Germany's combined). In addition, it was ...


2

In addition to the lend-lease reasons given by others, Japan had declared war on Britain at the same time as it declared war on the United States. Japan including the British Empire on the war declaration against the United States had to be reciprocated on the German side of the alliance with a declaration of war against the United States (since Britain and ...


0

First, the Soviet Union and Germany never agreed to attack Poland or share it. They agreed on spheres of influence, which would come into play with 'border changes'. Said 'border changes' did not mean an invasion. Hitler had accomplished much without war and there was little reason for him to think he would not get away with victimizing Poland with no ...


24

The question I might have asked is, "Is the U.S. a Superpower today because of World War ONE?" And that's the question I'll answer. In 1914, the U.S. probably was not the strongest country in the world (perhaps third or fourth, no weaker than fifth). By 1918, the U.S. was the strongest country in the world, with Germany, Britain, France, and Russia having ...


5

Good question with several answers. First a nod to Lennart for pointing out that Germany grew just like France and Britain and the USA, so a certain amount of "a rising tide floats all boats." However there were some factors that advantaged Germany more than the others: Highly educated, savings-minded workforce whose population losses were instantly ...


1

Hitler did not want a Munich Conference in 1938 or 1939. He wanted to attack Czechoslovakia and Poland on his own terms, and retain the ability to attack France at his leisure. His cold feet were about starting a major war, and mainly related to whether the German people were behind him on it. For example, he was resolved to attack Prague in 1938. Goebbels ...


1

"Everyone knows that having to fight on two opposite fronts at once is bad..." It can be, for sure. Everyone looks back to 1812 and Napoleon rather than 1918. Germany fought a two-front war and effectively won in the East with the Treaty of Brest-Litovsk. The Germans also believed (somewhat correctly) that the resources gained from their occupied territories ...


1

In August 1939, while Japan and the USSR were skirmishing, Germany and the USSR signed a Non-Aggression Pact that allowed Stalin to put some more focus on Japan (among other things). By early 1941, Japan decided it was time to focus on securing its oil supply in Indonesia and so shifted to its Pacific strategy. Hence they signed a neutrality pact with the ...


0

This question is a case study for anachronism, or rather how knowing what happened next influences our interpretation of historical actors at the time they make their decisions. In this case, we are looking back from Blitzkrieg France 1940 rather than ahead to a repeat of 1914. Hitler decided in early 1938 that it was time to start the war for Lebensraum. ...


5

Yes and no. Reasons for YES: Both were anti-communist and had geopolitical claims against the Soviet Union. Both were rebelling against the international order created by established powers as established in the settlement of World War I. Both were obsessed with economic autarky and wanted to build land empires to achieve it. Germany vis-a-vis "the ...


-2

Did ideological similarity play a role in Imperial Japan's decision to ally with Nazi Germany? A: nope...they made this decision at a time were there was no Nazi Germany... the axis germany/italy/japan were basically formed at the end of WW1 as a result of the treaty of Versailles -> their claims has been ignored during the peace negotiations... ...


3

HMS Spurious was a 1930's Albion Bus that, as your quote says, was converted to resemble the island of an aircraft carrier. It was used by the Deck Landing Control Officers school based at RNAS East Haven. Extract from The British Fleet Air Arm in World War II By Mark Barber. The book, at least in its google books form, does not directly mention HMS ...


2

I have a friend whose father worked on the Manhattan Project. Scientists (and other workers) for secret projects such as the Manhattan Project were recruited by higher ups, through reputation, or word of mouth. They didn't just "volunteer," because they weren't told what these projects were, or what the needed qualifications were; only the higher ups knew ...


0

I would say no (well, you wanted a clear answer). The ideological differences between Germany and Japan (and Italy) was greater than the similarities. Keep in mind that at Winston Churchill hated Jews as much as Hitler and at that time racism was very common even as official policy. War makes strange bedfellows and the enemy of my enemy is my friend. There ...


1

If you're referring specifically to deferments related to the Manhattan Project, this document is a fascinating read. It is apparently in response to arguments made in favor of giving technicians deferments based on security grounds, and instead argues that the hazards associated with the project put it in line with military service and forms a separate ...


4

Wikipedia's page on conscription actually gives a pretty good breakdown. In WWII, males between 18 and 64 were required to register, but the selections were limited by executive order on December 5, 1942 from from 21–45 to 18–38. Assuming the citation (George Q. Flynn, The Draft, 1940–1973) is correct, 50 million men from 18 to 45 were registered. The ...


6

Of course! There are major differences between the ideology of Germany, Japan and Italy, but there is one major similarity: they disliked the communists. If the immediate threat from the left was less than in Italy and Germany, it nevertheless is apparent that the establishment was alarmed by it. After 1918, when spontaneous riots over the rocketing ...


0

The common enemy was the U.S Japan's fuel supply was being blocked by the United States and the United States leadership was pro-Britain. If Hitler's ego had been restrained, he would not have declared war on the U.S. immediately after America declared war on Japan. So in reality it was more the friend of my enemy is my enemy. If Hitler had not declared war ...


8

No. For instance, you are wrong that Japan promoted racism on the official basis. In fact, throughout the war up to 1944 they conducted several international conferences against racism. This was very bold move given the position of Germany. Japan also was the government that proposed amendments to the League of Nations charter condemning racism (before the ...


15

The Japanese, Germans, and Italians primarily allied based on their late-bloomer status and desire for geopolitical revisionism. Whereas countries like England, France, Russia, and so forth had unified and developed empires in the centuries prior to industrialization, the Axis powers had not really unified and become politically and militarily centralized ...


22

I seriously doubt it. Japan was a traditional monarchy, philosophically and ideologically far closer to China than Germany. Of course both were mortal enemies and had been for centuries. Far more likely they were drawn together simply by the fact that both were shut out from the "international community" and felt slighted by the UK and US (and in case of ...


3

Neutral Switzerland was an venue for communication between belligerents' intelligence services, and thus was of benefit to all sides. Additionally, Germany used the Switzerland's famous watch-making industry to circumvent the allied blockade on Beryllium copper, used for springs in watches and machine guns. (The source: a book on history of metallurgy I ...


1

The problem was that the attack on England had failed. This meant that there was no way to relieve the blockade on Germany. Hitler was bankrupt with no options other than attacking Russia. They were literally ripping up hand railings in Berlin to get scrap metal. Everyone was on rations which were growing more stringent by the month. The Soviet Union was the ...


0

Sir Ian Kershaw, writing in BBC History magazine this month, comments that we have so little evidence on Hitler, that we will never know when he developed his anti-semitic predilections.


1

Ok here is the real answer. The entire purpose of the War was to fight Russia. Russia was Hitlers main foe and ultimate objective from the start. He did not want to destroy the United Kingdom or United States per say, he wanted to build a Germany centered Europe and trade with them (ironically kind of how it is today). Basically he wanted Germany to become ...


2

It's a negative number; the bombs were militarily unnecessary to secure the Japanese surrender. The US Strategic Bombing Survey, released 1946, estimated that: Based on a detailed investigation of all the facts, and supported by the testimony of the surviving Japanese leaders involved, it is the Survey's opinion that certainly prior to 31 December 1945, ...


6

The salaries stopped as soon as Flensburg government was dissolved. The officials and technical personnel went on with their lives - found other jobs, went home or emigrated. The buildings laid fallow until the Bundesrepublik & DDR were proclaimed in 1949, at what time they were turned to the East (in the Eastern Block) or West Germany (the rest of the ...


1

There was no restrictions on the civil liberties of Finnish Jews. Nazi Germany requested for the handing over of Finnish Jews, but Finnish leader C.G.Mannerheim refused. 350 Jews fought in the Finnish army on the German side. Several Jewish officers would have received the Iron Cross but refused. Finnish army also had a field synagogue. Finland handed over ...


1

Hitler himself wrote in Mein Kampf that he became an antisemite during his years in Vienna before the First World War. Hitler picked up the ideology of anti-Semitic Austrian politicians like Karl Lueger. During his political career Hitler believed that USA and Britain were heavily influenced by a Jewish conspiracy. It seems like his antipathy against these ...


-1

How can Hitler or anyone else be Hostile to Anglo-Saxons?. Anglo-Saxon England refers to the period of the history of the part of Great Britain that became known as England, lasting from Sub-Roman Britain following the end of Roman occupation, with the establishment of Anglo-Saxon kingdoms in the 5th century, until the Norman conquest of England in 1066 by ...


1

Churchills triumph, a novel by Michael Dobbs gives the best explanation for this. With Poland and Eastern Germany lost to Russia, France had to be built up as a bulwark against communism


2

many did try to run, at least one Polish Officer ran from the Soviet Executioners at Katyn. Much easier to run and hide in a forest than in an open featureless place like the Dunes of Latvia. the most consistently succesful tactic was to pretend to be dead and just hope you didn't suffocate in a mass grave before it was safe to dig yourself out. the father ...



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