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Germany lost an army of 200.000 to 300.000 in Stalingrad, 6th Army, part of "Heeresgruppe Süd". The German field army had 4.000.000 personnel in 1942 [Creveld, Fighting Power, German and US Army Performance, 1939-1945], which made this a loss of manpower of 5%.


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Bornholm was occupied by the Soviets during 1945-1946. A second source with links for each part of Denmark Mainland: Fighting was mostly between Danes resistance/german_hilf_polizei (also Danes). Greenland: During the war protected by Britain, Canada, and USA. According to agreement with Danish ambassador Kaufmann. Iceland: From 1918 until 1944 Iceland ...


15

"Liberation" is a bit misleading. The German occupation of Denmark ended as part of the May 4 surrender of German troops in Denmark, Netherlands, and northwestern Germany. No actual combat or invasion was involved; troops under Field Marshal Montgomery walked in essentially unopposed.


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From the article you linked: Most of Denmark was liberated from German rule in May 1945 by British forces commanded by Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery; the easternmost island of Bornholm was liberated by Soviet forces, who remained there for almost a year`. Given the dates, one thinks that (like in many other parts which were not in the main road to ...


-1

The three turning point battles, Stalingrad, North Africa, and Midway each eliminated Axis chances to win the war. The battle of Stalingrad meant the Germany could at best, "draw," not win, on the Soviet front. The "worst case" for the Allies there was continued "seesaw" warfare, in which case Anglo American victories elsewhere, that is Italy and Normandy ...


10

The Germans changed the gauge from Russian to German and could then use their own equipment. http://www.lexikon-der-wehrmacht.de/Zusatz/Heer/Eisenbahnpioniere.htm shows Wehrmacht railroad engineers (the military sort of engineer) changing the gauge. Reichsbahn personnel, civilians and forced laborers were also used to change the gauge.


4

As you asked, They did not have a treaty that "made" them attack their targets at specific times (they did have treaties of mutual protection though). But to answer why they did, Germany at that time figured that they had Britain bottled up and blockaded so it could do no harm to them, and they already controlled all of mainland Europe. They attacked the ...


1

Axis forces predominantly stopped short of Moscow due to freezing temperatures. Russian reinforcements were used to counterattack and push them back (which, after amazing gains, collapsed in spectacular defeat). The Japanese Empire was not a significant threat the the Soviet Union (despite Stalin's fears). Vladivostok could have been taken, and this would ...


7

Actually, the problems were worse than just rebuilding the railroads to narrow the gauge. Soviet stations, where trains were refuelled were too far apart for German engines - the larger Soviet engines carried more fuel and water and could go farther. The Germans had to rebuild the railroad to a narrower and also create new stations along the path to ...


17

It was more of a nuisance, than a reason for defeat. The part of a track that is hard to build is the bed. To narrow a track, all you have to do is pull out the spikes, move the rail and drive the spikes back in again. The bigger problem for the Germans was that the rail system in Russia is a hub-and-spokes design where all roads lead to Rome, meaning ...


31

The overall answer is that the Soviets were not rich in railways and destroyed much of it as they retreated. The Germans anticipated this, and had railway commandos rebuild much of the Soviet trunk lines and some feeders to standard gauge. They also maintained several of the wide gauge lines if captured intact and with enough rolling stock. Some efforts, ...


5

It is a persistent rumour that the practice of swinging in the United States originated with air force pilots during the Second World War. One widely circulated version of the story states that: As far as anyone knows, swinging (as this community exists today, in the United States) had its roots within an elite group of U.S. Air Force fighter pilots ...


4

Signing the pact with Germany by Yugoslavia didn't take an easy path. It took months of negotiations and tweaking which finally ended up on March 25th, 1941 when the treaty was signed. Only two days later, well-known March 27th took place overthrowing the regent Pavle and bringing 17 year old King Peter to reign, at least formally. British intelligence had a ...



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