Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

Part of the story is probably the Percentages agreement between Churchill and Stalin, from the Moscow Conference in 1944. According to Wikipedia, Churchill's account of the incident is the following: Churchill suggested that the Soviet Union should have 90 percent influence in Romania and 75 percent in Bulgaria; the United Kingdom should have 90 ...


8

Retrospectively, the only answer to your question is: "because of poor grasp of the local political and cultural context". In the 1920s, dominant countries were organized on the notion of nation state. This was a relatively recent development; for instance, Germany had formally existed only for 50 years or so at that time. Other countries had turned into ...


7

After reading up on the Chetnicks during WWII. Wow, they were a nasty piece of work. So lets look at the two groups here. On the one hand we have Tito's partisans. They are communist, one of the popular up-and-comming ideologies of the early 20th century among idealists (particular slavic ones, after the Russian Revolution). They are fighting to free their ...


6

I presume it would have been the F.N. model. 1922: This was a variation of the F.N. model. 1910 that was commissioned by the Yugoslavian military in the inter-war period with 60,000 ordered with both general issue and "officer" markings. Note, the Wikipedia article is horribly referenced, but you should be able to confirm this in Anthony Vanderlinden's ...


6

Neither Croatia nor Serbia existed after the war and hence hey could neither pay nor receive reparations. Yugoslavia would have ended up paying reparations to Yugoslavia, which would have been fairly pointless.


5

There were a couple reasons. The first was that Tito basically represented "a government of their [Soviet] choice." The second was that Tito showed that he could "take care of himself." Tito had started with the Russian Communist Party as early as 1917. When "Russia" became the Soviet Union, he was a member of the Soviet Communist party and secret police, ...


5

The Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes (the official name) or Kingdom of Yugoslavia was created after WW1 by the victor states by joining parts of Austro-Hungarian Empire populated by ethnic Slavs with Kingdom of Serbia under the dynasty of Karađorđević. That way the Habsburg monarchy was dissolved and the Serbian Kingdom is rewarded for being allied to ...


4

The apparent reason for the creation of these Slavic "multinational" states was to create states that were strong enough to act as "buffer states" against Austria, Hungary, and Bulgaria (Germany's allies in World War I). Czechoslovakia, Yugoslavia and Romania would, in fact go on to form the "Little Entente", with which France later formed an alliance. So ...


4

Let me recommend the book "The Forgotten 500" by Gregory A. Freeman that describes a pro-Allied group during what was essentially a civil war in Yugoslavia. Since the pro-Allied group was also pro-communist (edit: not sure they were pro-communist, but the U.S. gov disliked their leader), postwar politics muted their contributions. Publisher's summary: ...


4

The major benefit includes the SFRY's assets and property located abroad in the time of dissolution that was frozen by foreign states in which the assets/property was located. The assets/property that was of interest to successor states includes foreign currency and gold reserves and embassy buildings. ...


3

I wonder if it sheds any light on this decision if we compare the examples cited above with the one instance where the opposite happened- Galicia? Poles and Ukrainians were intermixed to a degree that would induce a headache in anyone trying to draw a "fair" borderEthnic Map of Poland (for the purposes of this discussion please consider "galicia" to be ...


3

Effective political lobbying and influence by political activists by the Czechs and the Yugoslav committee. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yugoslav_Committee Both Yugoslav Committee and the Czech already had the ear of important people moving into the Paris conference.


3

The Soviets only had a small presence in Yugoslavia, during the capture of Belgrade where they only had an assisting role - Tito's Partisans proved more than capable of defeating the Nazis on their own. The troops in Yugoslavia, the 2nd and 3rd Ukranian Front, were needed elsewhere, and so were redeployed to Hungary once it was clear the Yugoslavians had ...


2

When Bangladesh became a separate country from Pakistan (transforming from East Pakistan into Bangladesh) they adopted a Bengali song written by Rabindranath Tagore in 1905, called "Shonar Bangala" (Golden Bengal). Since one of the reasons for the aspiration of a new nation was the Bengali language itself, this seemed to be the right thing to do. However, ...


2

As Hitler wanted to conquer Soviet Union,he wanted to establish full control of southeast Europe. So he forced Yugoslavia to join Tripartite Pact. That happened on 25th of March 1941. People in Yugoslavia were unhappy because of that desicion. Also that did not suit to Great Britain because they lost another ally on east. All of that were reasons why Chief ...


2

Was there a united Yugoslavia? There was a Yugoslavia, but it was split to Croatia (with Bosnia and Herzegovina), Serbia and Slovenia (which was again split for Germany/Austria Italy and Hungary). I don't think you can say Yugoslavia switched the side, there were different parties. During the war, the Ustaše (More or less Croatia) stayed with Nazi-Germany. ...


2

I would say that the fundamental cause of World War I was the "Serbian" crisis, of which the Bosnian crisis and the assassination of the Archduke were merely "manifestations." Austria's response to the assassination of the Archduke was the so-called July Ultimatum. Briefly its terms included that Serbia fire a list of government officials, suppress books ...


2

After Congress of Berlin Bosnia and Herzegovina was occupied by Austro-Hungary, but still was formally part of Ottoman Empire. As Montenegro and Serbia wanted to incorporate that Ottoman province together, they were dissapointed with that decision and as only consolation they got international recognition and Niš was annexed to Serbia. Regardless to ...


2

Yugoslavia was established before WW2 (on 3 October 1929 the Kingdom of SHS was renamed to Kingdom of Yugoslavia), but it is true that after the WW2 the entire regime changed. (During and) after WW2 there was communist republic with president Tito, named Democratic Federal Yugoslavia (1943), renamed to the Federal People's Republic of Yugoslavia in 1946. ...


2

Yugoslavia was created after WW1 (initially as the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes), and as such had no reason to try and change the balance of power created in Europe as a result of post-WW1 peace treaties. Many members of the country's ruling circles were pro-British, and in March of 1941 they organised a coup d'etat. Hitler's response was to ...


2

Strangely enough, I believe that it was the ideology of Communism. That is, the various ethnic groups under Tito put aside their differences, because "we are all Communists here." (I have no sources on Yugoslav Communism, and am basing my answer on Chuikov's "the Battle For Stalingrad," in which "Communism" was a unifying force for the defenders. A similar ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible