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Jul
18
awarded  Yearling
May
13
awarded  Citizen Patrol
May
13
comment Unemployed people in ancient Rome
It was slightly means-tested in the early days, insofar as the lines were long and generally the non-poor were unwilling to spend the time.
May
13
comment Gap between poor and rich in the Roman Empire
@user1477388: By living off the bare minimums. Housing was much cheaper because it wasn't built to today's standards (or size). Energy use was many orders of magnitude lower. Transportation, for the poor, was exclusively by foot (in fact the defining point of being upper class, eques, was access to horses). Etc. Today's lower classes (to say nothing of middle class) are better equipped than the Roman upper class.
Apr
11
comment What is the best historical example of conflict between two cultures with differing levels of technology?
@Evicatos: Of course they took an improved design for the gladius from the Spanish -- they already had gladii long beforehand, just shorter and narrower. (I'm sure you knew, but a clarification for others seemed in order.)
Apr
10
comment What were Hiroshima and Nagasaki known for prior to World War II?
During the war, but before the bomb, Hiroshima was largely known as a safe haven. Not sure about before the war, though.
Apr
10
comment What is the best historical example of conflict between two cultures with differing levels of technology?
But Afghanistan is hundreds of years behind the West -- surely more of what this question is asking for?
Apr
10
comment What is the best historical example of conflict between two cultures with differing levels of technology?
Did you mean Afghanistan? Iraq wasn't that far behind the US, maybe ~50 years tops.
Oct
25
comment Which Babylonian tablets contains the list of squares and cubes?
@T.E.D.: I think it's The Cuneiform Inscriptions of Western Asia; Vol. IV: A Selection from the Miscellaneous Inscriptions of Assyria by Rawlinson "assisted by" Smith.
Oct
25
comment Which Babylonian tablets contains the list of squares and cubes?
At some point I'll try to make sense of the inscriptions themselves and see if I can interpret them as squares and cubes.
Oct
24
comment Which Babylonian tablets contains the list of squares and cubes?
I see the plate in question (on p. 105 of the site) but I'm not sure it's what we want. There are lots of tables of square roots, but this quote is about a table of squares and cubes, not a table of square roots.
Oct
23
accepted Which Babylonian tablets contains the list of squares and cubes?
Oct
23
comment Which Babylonian tablets contains the list of squares and cubes?
Nothing on the table of contents suggests anything mathematical unless you count the hemerology of 32-33, though it might be on one of the undescribed fragmentary sections: 21, 23, 24, 27-30 as I read it.
Oct
23
comment Which Babylonian tablets contains the list of squares and cubes?
Thank you! It looks like the cuneiform book is online: echo.mpiwg-berlin.mpg.de/ECHOdocuView?url=/permanent/library/… , I'll check it out.
Sep
20
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
18
comment How did ancient mystery religions impact Christianity?
There were a great many mystery religions, not just the gnostics. Mithras, Bacchus, Isis, the Eleusian Mysteries (as Mark mentions above), IOM Dolichenus (a syncretic combination of Baal and Jupiter), Magna Mater, Sol Invictus, and so forth. To the Romans, the worship of Iesus Nazarenus was just another mystery religion.
Jul
18
awarded  Yearling
May
13
revised Which Babylonian tablets contains the list of squares and cubes?
follow-up
May
12
awarded  Nice Question
Mar
26
awarded  Organizer