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Mar
26
awarded  Organizer
Jan
17
awarded  Nice Question
Jan
11
comment Which Babylonian tablets contains the list of squares and cubes?
Nice tablet. But surely not a list of 59 squares or 32 cubes -- that looks like a single problem, so I don't think it's one of the tablets. But nice information, and +1 for that.
Jan
10
revised Literacy in the classical world
narrow
Jan
10
comment Which Babylonian tablets contains the list of squares and cubes?
(+1, of course, for a good answer to a hard question.)
Jan
10
comment Which Babylonian tablets contains the list of squares and cubes?
Hmm, right place and roughly the right time of discovery. But I thought Plimpton 322 was newer than 2000 BC? But perhaps they got that wrong.
Jan
10
asked Which Babylonian tablets contains the list of squares and cubes?
Sep
2
comment How much has U.S. currency inflated since 1792?
I did an in-depth comparison maybe two years ago, comparing the median US income from ~1970 to the present day using the CPI-U vs. SS's inflation numbers. The SS inflation figures had the value of the ~1970 median income at something like $150,000 in present dollars, while the CPI-U had it as about $50,000. Compared to the present median income of ~$50,000 you ask whether the median income from 40 years ago would buy you (1) roughly the same as today, under the CPI-U, or (2) roughly three times what it would buy today, under SS. (My analysis was more complex but those are the basics.)
Aug
31
comment Why are the democracies of France, Israel and India rated “Flawed Democracies”?
The EIU scored the US pretty close to how they scored France, with the US toward the bottom of "full democracies" and France toward the top of "flawed democracies". France scores the same or higher than the US in two out of their five categories: 'electoral process and pluralism' and 'civil liberties'.
Aug
31
comment Any notable battles fought with steel vs. bronze weapons?
I think that the consensus opinion on iron vs. bronze is that the former is just as good and much less expensive to produce, not that iron is actually better than bronze. Iron allowed armies to move from elites fighting elites to vast armies composed of people who could never afford bronze armor.
Aug
30
comment How much has U.S. currency inflated since 1792?
I didn't make any claims about the meaning of consumption bundles, only that it's factually incorrect to claim that the "purpose of CPI inflations is to indicate the long term cost of labour to capitalists". As for the SGS chart, it's quite wrong (thus my downvote to and comment on T.E.D.'s answer).
Aug
30
comment How much has U.S. currency inflated since 1792?
CPI does not measure the cost of labor to capitalists. Rather, it measures the cost of living for mid-low income urban consumers. But the answer is otherwise excellent, so +1.
Aug
30
comment How much has U.S. currency inflated since 1792?
-1: ShadowStats is extremely unreliable; their inflation statistics are easily shown to be nonsense. Further, the claim that the buying power was relatively stable for most of the history of the US is also incorrect, being perpetuated by the 'wrong' choice of axes: linear instead of logarithmic.
Aug
30
comment Early history of prime numbers
"From what has been said above it is evident that the sixteen siitras of Swamiji's Vedic Mathematics are his own compositions, and have nothing to do with the mathematics of the Vedic period. Although there is nothing Vedic in his book, Swlimiji designates his preface to the book as A Descriptive Prefactory Note on the Astounding Wonders of Ancient Indian Mathematics [...] The deceptive title of Swiimiji' s book and the attribution of the sixteen siitras to the Parisistas of the Atharvaveda etc., have confused and baffled the readers who have failed to recognize the real nature of the book"
Aug
30
comment Early history of prime numbers
That's a common misconception. Your second link deals with it explicitly:
Aug
30
comment Early history of prime numbers
Your second and third links are about Venkatraman's 20th-century book Vedic Mathematics which is several thousand years too new. The first link does mention prime numbers but unfortunately does not actually have information on where they appear in Vedic mathematics.
Aug
8
awarded  Critic
Aug
7
answered Where did the Romans store their cash?
Aug
2
awarded  Commentator
Aug
2
comment Intersection Between Computer Science and History?
I don't consider any of DNA analysis, computational linguistics, cliometrics, or econometrics to be computer science.