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Dec
17
comment What was the most accurate map of the world before artificial satellites?
+1. Note, however, that some remote places were likely not thoroughly mapped before the advent of satellite photography; for example, it is commonly stated that major details about the interior of New Guinea was unknown to Western mapmakers until the 1930s.
Dec
2
comment Was there a serious proposal to offer India territory in East Africa?
Vaguely related: Wikipedia says that Aden Province was part of British India from 1839 to 1937, and also (not as good sourced) that British Somaliland was part of British India from 1884 to 1898. (I have found no indication that Indians were part of the actual administration of these places.)
Nov
21
comment When passports/border checks became widespread?
In the first wave of globalization, from the mid-1800s until World War I, there was, I believe, widespread international migration without passports. I think this disappeared after 1914, but cursory Wikipediaing gave no definite source, so no answer from me (yet)...
Oct
26
comment When did the majority of Americans stop living on farms?
Why is this question "on hold"? As evidenced by the answers, this is not material that can be "easily answered by looking up the relevant topic on Wikipedia". There is also relevant clarification to be had on the relevant definitions (rural/urban vs farm/nonfarm).
Oct
25
comment Communist resistance groups in the Nazi German military
Thank you for your opinion - I would however like sources for your first, second and fourth paragraph before upvoting. I have never heard of Soviet PoWs being stationed as troops in Norway (only as inmates of PoW camps). I agree that it is possible to disagree about the extent of "independent" communism in the West during the cold war, but Communists got 12 % of votes in the 1945 Norwegian election, and 26 % in France, so clearly there was some popular support for Communism in the West.
Aug
11
comment Does the Kimmirut find indicate pre-Viking Europeans traveling to Baffin Island?
@Joe thank you for your comment about turning this into an answer, just did that, would probably not have gotten around to it without your reply.
Jun
10
comment Why did Argentina seize South Georgia immediately prior to the Falklands invasion?
I read this answer as a general comment on the Falklands War, and how the entire strategy was devised a) to boost domestic support as much as to actually make military sense and b) with the illusion that the UK would have a hard time responding. The "set of worthless rocks" I take to include both South Georgia and the Falklands. However, the answer is not very clearly formulated, so it is hard to say. But no downvote from me.
May
28
comment Is Taiwan always a part of People's Republic of China?
I wanted to make an answer based more on international law than Taiwan-specific history, but have neither the time nor competence. It seems to me that things changed dramatically after 1945. There were several border adjustments / new countries in 1945 that "everyone" accepted, but a lot of conflicts after that seem to have been "frozen": formally, both the Israel/Palestine conflict and Taiwan's independence have been settled in military / "de facto" terms but are still in legal limbo. Tibet is formally resolved but there is still some debate in the West. Kashmir is not resolved. Etc...
May
23
comment Were there any battles in Continental Europe that were decided by “peasants with pitchforks?”
You refer to guns as "government-issued weapons" At the 1612 Battle of Kringen a band of Norwegian peasants, supposedly "spontaneously" organized, defeated a group of Scottish mercenaries. The farmers decidedly had guns, but that would be part of the tools they used for a living, in hunting and doing other 17-th-century farming stuff. So it might be a bit strict to rule out guns when defining "farmers with pitchforks".
May
22
comment What was the most recent country to be conquered and dissapear
@horsh as far as I could tell no UN member nation has been "conquered and ceased to exist as a country" (though of course there have been foreign-induced regime changes). I now looked at the member states of the League of Nations and all of these also appear to exist in some form today.
May
22
comment What was the most recent country to be conquered and dissapear
@ClintEastwood sorry, perhaps bad phrasing by me: my point was just that Zanzibar+Tanganyika=Tanzania can probably not be termed a "conquest" and that (as far as I know) the merger itself was peaceful, even though atrocities occurred earlier in the process. In any case, feel free to let me know if "South Vietnam" does not answer your question.
May
14
comment Does the Kimmirut find indicate pre-Viking Europeans traveling to Baffin Island?
Also see this article: counter-currents.com/2013/02/… which goes throught some of Sutherland's research. The (to my unlearned eyes, plausible) claims seem to be more about the extent of Norse exploration/colonization in the general Greenland/Baffin area in the previously accepted post-1000AD timeframe rather than any extension of this timeframe to earlier than 1000AD.
May
14
comment Does the Kimmirut find indicate pre-Viking Europeans traveling to Baffin Island?
The article you link is pretty vague on timing, talking about " from 1000 AD to 1450 AD or even earlier." and only later about dating of some yarn that "predates the Vikings". It it not clear that Sutherland (the archaeologist) believes that the finds pre-date the Vikings. Not sure that this article: tinyurl.com/m3jlcnu refers to the same site, but it says "Sutherland uncovered strong evidence that an archeological site called Nanook, on southern Baffin Island, was a Norse settlement established around 1300 AD and was likely used by Vikings based in Greenland to trade with the Dorset."
Jan
10
comment How did Henry Knox retrieve the cannons that fell into the river?
Isn't it likely that they tied ropes around the cannons before crossing the river, on the off-chance that the ice wouldn't hold? (You would expect that for the second time in particular....)
Oct
23
comment What is the oldest state/nation that has abolished the death penalty?
People accused of (some types of) crimes in Michigan are still at risk of the federal death penalty of the United States, so I would say Venezuela "wins" (if Olivier's answer is correct), even if abolition took place at a later point in time.
Sep
27
comment How many different countries could a person alive today have lived in without leaving their hometown?
Now if you could find some pre-1939 border adjustments between Czechoslovakia or A-H and Poland or Romania...
Sep
27
comment How many different countries could a person alive today have lived in without leaving their hometown?
@TeaDrinker Fine, nice answer and nice map! Upvoted :-)
Sep
26
comment How many different countries could a person alive today have lived in without leaving their hometown?
You will likely find your city in Eastern Europe. For example, Carpatho-Ukraine appears to have been part of A-H, then Czechoslovakia, then declared independent, then Hungary, then Soviet Union, then Ukraine. Of course, it depends on how you define "change of countries" - is Hungary distinct from A-H, is Ukrainian SSR distinct from Ukraine, is Croatia distinct from Yugoslavia?
Aug
20
comment Was it common practice in Victorian London or other Western European cities to name locations as places where fictional characters lived and acted?
Mas a Tierra in the South Pacific was the place where Alexander Selkirk, inspiration for the fictional character Robinson Crusoe, was marooned in 1704. Fittingly, in 1966 Chile changed the name to Robinson Crusoe Island.
May
30
comment Looking for a symbol for Southern USA communism
I second T.E.D's suggestion of the raised fist. However, I think the symbolism should also depend on a) the republic's attitude to Native Americans (Seminole symbolism perhaps? Didn't find any in Wikipedia) and b) slavery/African Americans. Theoretical socialism/Marxism should be sympathetic to these groups, but of course that might no be the case in practice. Also, is the Republic pro-Spanish/Mexican? Predominantly industrial (hammer) or agricultural (palms? oranges? cotton)?