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seen Apr 14 at 19:24

Jan
10
comment How did Henry Knox retrieve the cannons that fell into the river?
Isn't it likely that they tied ropes around the cannons before crossing the river, on the off-chance that the ice wouldn't hold? (You would expect that for the second time in particular....)
Oct
23
comment What is the oldest state/nation that has abolished the death penalty?
People accused of (some types of) crimes in Michigan are still at risk of the federal death penalty of the United States, so I would say Venezuela "wins" (if Olivier's answer is correct), even if abolition took place at a later point in time.
Sep
27
comment How many different countries could a person alive today have lived in without leaving their hometown?
Now if you could find some pre-1939 border adjustments between Czechoslovakia or A-H and Poland or Romania...
Sep
27
comment How many different countries could a person alive today have lived in without leaving their hometown?
@TeaDrinker Fine, nice answer and nice map! Upvoted :-)
Sep
26
comment How many different countries could a person alive today have lived in without leaving their hometown?
You will likely find your city in Eastern Europe. For example, Carpatho-Ukraine appears to have been part of A-H, then Czechoslovakia, then declared independent, then Hungary, then Soviet Union, then Ukraine. Of course, it depends on how you define "change of countries" - is Hungary distinct from A-H, is Ukrainian SSR distinct from Ukraine, is Croatia distinct from Yugoslavia?
Aug
20
comment Was it common practice in Victorian London or other Western European cities to name locations as places where fictional characters lived and acted?
Mas a Tierra in the South Pacific was the place where Alexander Selkirk, inspiration for the fictional character Robinson Crusoe, was marooned in 1704. Fittingly, in 1966 Chile changed the name to Robinson Crusoe Island.
May
30
comment Looking for a symbol for Southern USA communism
I second T.E.D's suggestion of the raised fist. However, I think the symbolism should also depend on a) the republic's attitude to Native Americans (Seminole symbolism perhaps? Didn't find any in Wikipedia) and b) slavery/African Americans. Theoretical socialism/Marxism should be sympathetic to these groups, but of course that might no be the case in practice. Also, is the Republic pro-Spanish/Mexican? Predominantly industrial (hammer) or agricultural (palms? oranges? cotton)?
May
15
comment Was there a state in history where influence of sport fans on politics was greater than in medieval Byzantine Empire?
Vaguely related: the 1969 "Football War" between El Salvador and Honduras. Wikipedia: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Football_war . I have heard stated that a football (soccer) game was a triggering factor of the war, but the Wikipedia article appears to tone this down a bit.
May
14
comment Emigration restrictions in history
@jwenting: yes, but in the case described here you could also be denied an emigration permit for "precautionary" reasons. Also, do you have a reference that most countries require a passport to leave? At least in Norway this was not the case until after the enactment of the Schengen treaty in the late 1990s (and then only for leaving the Schengen area). Of course most airlines (and other means of transport) will enforce passport control but that is for fear of fines/problems in the receiving country.
May
10
comment Was the N.E.P. of Russia successful in terms of economics?
Sorry. Didn't have the book at hand when I wrote the answer. I now see that the book's Chapter 4 (around 20 pages) deals with NEP. Do not have time to read all the details right now, and from the concluding sections it seems rather inconclusive. The author is, however, more concerned with getting the numbers of production growth right than about actual evaluation of the policies.
Jan
18
comment What is the state of the art historical analysis of claims that Carthaginians discovered America?
There is probably some relevant information in the Wikipedia article on Atlantis: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atlantis . A landmass in the Atlantic was commonly mentioned in ancient times, without that being proof that anyone sailed to America. I don't see how an image of this landmass on a coin changes anything, but I'm no expert. (Also, I do not think there is any evidence for Carthaginicians circumnavigating Africa, just going to Cameroon. At least, that what it says in the link you give.)
Nov
27
comment What was the reason for Soviet troops to withdraw from Yugoslavia in World War II?
Thanks! Source for that last statement? While it might be cronologically correct, I've never heard it cited as a reason for their departure (you can be read as implying a causal connection, but maybe you don't mean it that way)
Nov
27
comment What was the reason for Soviet troops to withdraw from Yugoslavia in World War II?
Good question. Allow me to point out that the Soviets also occupied a part of Norway: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… and left without fuss after Germany capitulated.
Oct
22
comment Why did Austronesian/Polynesian people not colonize Australia?
I'm no expert, so I'll add one minor detail as a comment: According to Wikipedia, some of the population in Northern Australia had "cultural and genetical" links to New Guinea, see en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torres_Strait_Islanders .
Sep
24
comment 1901 Boxer Protocol settlement to Norway
Thanks! I agree deaths of missionaries is a likely explanation. Still, if anyone have more specific answers (and also answers to the second point), I'd be grateful for that as well :-)
Sep
21
comment Were well-connected Germans able to park their sons in Norway during WWII?
+1 Excellent question. I'm Norwegian and have never thought of this, but it certainly seems reasonable. Though there seems to be some stereotype about the joys of serving in France, as well, at least before D-Day.
Aug
2
comment Intersection Between Computer Science and History?
Your argument is consistent, but it should be mentioned that this is an controversional point of view that a lot of people (including me) do not share. A less strict argument in a similar vein is the Lucas critique.