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location New York, New York
age 57
visits member for 3 years, 1 month
seen 11 hours ago

I took a double major in Economics and History in college in the 1970s. My "sweet spot" probably lies at the intersection of those two subjects. For instance, "Don't fire until you see the whites of their eyes" was really an "economic" admonition--to conserve ammunition.

I am the published author of "A Modern Approach to Graham and Dodd Investing" (Wiley, 2004), an (economic) "history of the future," and the unpublished author of "Axis Overstretch," an economic analysis of World War II.


Nov
18
answered How did the Dutch East India Company (VOC) have so much revenue when they only control small part of Indonesia?
Nov
17
comment How did Castro gain control over the Cuban military and police?
@Yannis Rizos: As I understood it, the rank and file of the Cuban army was pro Castro, or at least not pro Batista, so once Castro removed a few of the top officers, the army was his. And in "reconstituting" it, he would naturally pick the most favorable elements.
Nov
16
comment How did Castro gain control over the Cuban military and police?
@LennartRegebro: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fidel_Castro Second sentence or so, "He served as commander in chief of the armed forces." This was right after the civil war, so he had just merged Batista's army with his own. Under the section "Batista's Fall," it talks about how a whole battalion deserted from Batista to him even though he had only 300 men. It's not easy reading for a non-native English speaker, and I "read between the lines" but those are my conclusions.
Nov
16
comment How did Castro gain control over the Cuban military and police?
@LennartRegebro: See the link.
Nov
16
answered How did Castro gain control over the Cuban military and police?
Nov
16
comment What was the social status of a man who failed the civil service exams in Imperial China ( 1200 - 1800 AD )?
@grayQuant: It would help a little more than it would hurt. But the operative metric is "a little."
Nov
15
revised Why were there “hussars” all across Europe?
Added links
Nov
15
comment When did the <input> tag come about, and in what web browser?
Should we move this question to "Programming?" SE. It's technically history, but a specialized topic that might be better answered by others in this specialty.
Nov
15
answered How big was the Golden Horde?
Nov
15
comment How were mounted infantry (like dragoons) used in battle?
@PieterGeerkens: Ok, fixed.
Nov
15
revised How were mounted infantry (like dragoons) used in battle?
Correction.
Nov
15
comment New theory on origins of modern-day Romania?
Depending on how you defined it, Wallachia represented perhaps 16% of the land area, but a much greater proportion of the population of "Romania," and the latter counts for a lot more.
Nov
15
comment How were mounted infantry (like dragoons) used in battle?
@MarkC.Wallace: I'd say it's more like the time period. Cavalry versus infantry tactics evolved greatly between the 17th and 19th centuries.
Nov
15
revised How were mounted infantry (like dragoons) used in battle?
added 23 characters in body
Nov
15
answered How were mounted infantry (like dragoons) used in battle?
Nov
14
reviewed Edit How big was the Golden Horde?
Nov
14
revised How big was the Golden Horde?
Added a second question on origin.
Nov
14
comment Why is the United States the only developed country whose labour laws leave most up to the employer?
Based on the turn the discussion has taken, I proposed to the mods to move this question to Politics SE.
Nov
13
accepted Why did Frederick the Great do so much worse against the Russians than against his other enemies in the Seven Years' War?
Nov
12
comment Why did Frederick the Great do so much worse against the Russians than against his other enemies in the Seven Years' War?
Upvoted your answer. It's incomplete, but useful, and may have set me on the right track. It seems that the Russians chose better defensive ground because they were "playing not to lose," instead of "playing to win." That led to a resilient mindset, and made the Russians hard to defeat (even though they shouldn't have won at Kunersdorf if Frederick had been more careful). In this regard, Empress Elizabeth couldn't have been more different from her eventual successor, Catherine the Great.Can't imagine Elizabeth doing a deal with Frederick over Poland. history.stackexchange.com/questions/10426/…