21,902 reputation
13498
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location New York, New York
age 56
visits member for 2 years, 6 months
seen 12 hours ago

I took a double major in Economics and History in college in the 1970s. My "sweet spot" probably lies at the intersection of those two subjects. For instance, "Don't fire until you see the whites of their eyes" was really an "economic" admonition--to conserve ammunition.

I am the published author of "A Modern Approach to Graham and Dodd Investing" (Wiley, 2004), an (economic) "history of the future," and the unpublished author of "Axis Overstretch," an economic analysis of World War II.


Jun
13
answered What was the role of Nikita Khrushchev during the battle of Stalingrad?
Jun
12
comment How much excellent were relations between American soldiers and the Vietnamese people?
"Follow [and represent] the scholarship on the matter" is the most anyone can ask for. We are not the experts here.
Jun
12
comment Battles won by much weaker side
I hated voting to closet this interesting question that is not quite right for the site. Basically, battles won by the weaker side are unusual (percentagewise), but there's nothing special or rare about them; it happens from time to time. A good question must be more "restrictive," than this, and a way to do this is to impose additional restrictions. For instance, what are battles won by the weaker side led by a woman? Off the top of my head, I can think only of battles fought by Joan of Arc. That makes it a more suitable question with a very "short list" of answers.
Jun
12
comment Were there many “co-headed” commands where the senior member was younger than the junior?
In most of the examples above, you have co-operating commanders from ALLIED armies led independently. But Marlborough and Eugene were different. They co-commanded a "blended" central army made up of different nationalities. And they were described by Churchill (Marlborough's descendant) as "one soul in two bodies." An upvote for trying.
Jun
12
comment Why did Britain and France not declare war against the Soviet Union when it invaded Poland in WW2?
@FelixGoldberg: Here is my main source. ibiblio.org/pha/timeline/410622dwp.html "Noone has been a more consistent opponent of Communism than I [Churchill] have for the last twenty-five years. I will unsay no words that I've spoken about it. But all this fades away before the spectacle which is now unfolding."
Jun
10
comment Did people have better nutrition before agriculture?
@kubanczyk: I think "healthier" in this context meant compared to their contemporaries, not to us, of course.
Jun
10
answered Why didn't World-Community take no step to remove Mubutu or Robert Mugabe from office?
Jun
6
comment Was Napoleon as short as “common knowledge” states?
Basically Napoleon was "short" compared to his BODYGUARD. But not compared to the general population.
Jun
6
comment Were there many “co-headed” commands where the senior member was younger than the junior?
@Drux: Eisenhower and MacArthur were U.S. generals at the same time, but never "co-commanded" an army together.
Jun
6
revised Were there many “co-headed” commands where the senior member was younger than the junior?
Added examples for clarity
Jun
6
comment Were there many “co-headed” commands where the senior member was younger than the junior?
@How was Cecil regarded? Was he considered Elizabeth I's "alterego?"
Jun
5
comment Why was Woody Woodpecker a “natural” hit during WW2?
The book didn't discuss these characters. But it discussed "similar" ones, "Spanky," and "Alfalfa," and "Little Rascal." I thought it was too much of a stretch to transfer them to this discussion. Basically, I've cited the source and the relevant chapter, but you'll have to read the whole context to determine what is right and wrong. You'll also have to read at least two more chapters about the earlie Revolution and Civil War crisis periods. Basically, I've synopsized about one-third of a 750 page book in one paragraph.
Jun
5
comment Why was Woody Woodpecker a “natural” hit during WW2?
The ward "wars" is linked to the book "Generations," by Willian Strauss and Neil HoweThe relevant chapter is about the so-called "Silent Generation," the children born in the 1930s and early 1940s (who are now elders such as Warren Buffett).
Jun
4
answered Why was Woody Woodpecker a “natural” hit during WW2?
Jun
4
revised Why was Woody Woodpecker a “natural” hit during WW2?
deleted 4 characters in body
Jun
4
revised Why was Woody Woodpecker a “natural” hit during WW2?
added background
Jun
4
comment How historically accurate is Les Miserables?
Do you have a context for your question (which would make it more answerable)? Are you concerned about particular "features" of the plays, such as the depiction of art, or the treatment of women, or are you "fishing" for historical discrepancies? I might start by checking for differences between the novels and the movies/plays?
Jun
4
comment How much did the Chinese Summer Palace cost to build?
Anecdotally, I once read somewhere that CiXi included a lake with some sailboats as part of the palace package and said something like, "I didn't gut the navy, I just put it on royal grounds."
Jun
3
comment Were there many “co-headed” commands where the senior member was younger than the junior?
The last paragraph of the original question was: "I'm not talking about situations with a senior commander and a "random" (but older) junior commander, in the ranks, but ones where the junior is "next to" the senior and is effectively the senior's "alter ego" or even "Mini Me." That spells "mentioned in the same breath" to me. I actually upvoted your answer because it was useful, and because maybe I didn't make myself clear the first time. I'll leave it to your judgment whether "Alexander and Parmenio" or "Don Juan and Doria" are equivalent to "Buffett and Munger." Maybe they are.
Jun
3
comment Were there many “co-headed” commands where the senior member was younger than the junior?
These are examples after a fashion, but do people mention their names in the same breath? I'm talking about "Marlborough and Eugene" or (on U.S. television) "Batman and Robin." For instance, Villars was a brilliant general one of only six "Marshals of France" in history, having bypassed Boufflers, who was merely a "pretty good" leader.