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Dec
3
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
3
comment What were the key differences between United States' and Indian revolutions?
Actually, the Napoleonic wars prevented the Americans from being crushed in the war of 1812, so I consider it a fair point even if made in the "context" of the American Revolution. But certain Europeans, whom I won't name, seem to get annoyed when we Americans "conflate" or group separate events under one heading.
Dec
3
reviewed Reject Why did Hitler attack the Soviet Union when he was still busy fighting the United Kingdom?
Dec
3
revised Wiliam Wallace vs. Robert Bruce: Why Did One Win and One Lose?
deleted 1 characters in body
Dec
3
comment Wiliam Wallace vs. Robert Bruce: Why Did One Win and One Lose?
@PieterGeerkens: Why don't you post an answer based around that relevant observation? Comments are "second class citizens" on this site.
Dec
2
comment Rommel's letter to his wife from November 16, 1942
I'd move this question to German language SE, where there are a large percentage of native speakers, some of whom may know (or have access to) the original quote. A few are also here on History SE, but most of them not.
Dec
2
reviewed Approve norway tag wiki excerpt
Dec
2
revised How did Greece avoid the Soviet sphere of influence?
added 40 characters in body
Dec
2
answered How did Greece avoid the Soviet sphere of influence?
Dec
2
comment What is the significance of “Flappers” in American history?
@PieterGeerkens: Here's why you THINK I'm off. In our time, the "Women's Lib" of the l960s led to the "girl power" of today. And you're referring to a women's rights movement from the 1890s that led to the 19th Amendment of 1920, and later the Flapper Movement of the 1920s. I'm alleging two pairs of mother-daughter phenomena 30-40 years in duration. BTW, TR's Bull Moose movement was in 1912, closer to 1920 than 1890s. See the addendum above.
Dec
2
comment Did the Huns contribute to the Great Migration of Germanic Peoples into the Western Empire?
To the downvoter: Are you alleging that the Hun's made ZERO contribution to the migration of Germanic peoples? The question asked for a "contribution," not really a cause.
Dec
2
revised What is the significance of “Flappers” in American history?
added 254 characters in body
Dec
2
comment What is the significance of “Flappers” in American history?
@PieterGeerkens: Here is the source for the "generational" alignment: amazon.com/Generations-History-Americas-Future-1584/dp/…. FDR was a member of what the book calls the "Missionary" Generation (which I call the "Rendezvous" in my own book). Born 1861-1882, it is the idealistic post (Civil) War generation that is most analogous to the Baby Boomers born after World War II. (Obama is arguably the new FDR.) The 19th Amendment (women's suffrage) was passed in 1920, and the daughters of these "Missionary" (or Rendezvous) women were the Flappers.
Dec
1
comment Was Casablanca a “safe” place for the Allies to hold a global conference in January, 1943?
London is "closer" to Berlin than Casablanca to Tunis as the crow flies. But guarded by a large anti-tank ditch aka the English Channel.
Dec
1
asked Was Casablanca a “safe” place for the Allies to hold a global conference in January, 1943?
Dec
1
reviewed Leave Open Switzerland's political isolation after World War II
Dec
1
reviewed Leave Open Who was the Ottoman who started as a slave boy and eventually became Grand Vizier by the time he was 80?
Dec
1
reviewed Leave Open Did James Monroe and James Madison ever disagree?
Nov
29
accepted Why were troops with bayonets often effective against enemy cavalry even though the bayonet was a “secondary” weapon?
Nov
29
comment Switzerland's political isolation after World War II
@LennartRegebro: "Since its founding, Switzerland has been somewhat isolated from the rest of Europe." That's basically by design. I don't consider it a problem though. At some times, it's even an advantage. The point I was trying to make is that Switzerland now appears to be headed back toward the status quo ante (WWII).