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comment What made Stalingrad a turning point in the second world war?
@PieterGeerkens: If you make that argument, then even Midway would be a high water mark, not a decisive battle. The four carriers the Japanese lost there pale in comparison to the fact that the U.S. built the equivalent of the Japanese fleet every 18 months. But I was following the "conventional" wisdom that Stalingrad was one of three turning point (in your-speak) "high-water mark" battles. I edited my answer to make this point.
Jul
26
comment What did Germany do in World War II about the different rail gauge in the Soviet Union?
@LightnessRacesinOrbit: Ok, added link.
Jul
25
comment What does “the purpose of history is ideological” mean?
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it seems to be a homework question.
Jul
25
comment What did Germany do in World War II about the different rail gauge in the Soviet Union?
@lejonet: That's "common knowledge" (among World War II buffs).
Jul
22
comment Why didn't Stalin use force to bring Tito into line?
possible duplicate of What was the reason for Soviet troops to withdraw from Yugoslavia in World War II?
Jul
22
comment Have governments or combatants marked the houses of groups to be persecuted?
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it appears to be about a conspiracy theory.
Jul
19
comment Why were we taught virtually nothing about the Holocaust during the fifties and sixties?
@MarkC.Wallace: I had the same experience, born 1957, and more to the point, there appears to be an answer, see my post below.
Jul
12
comment Did the increase of slavery in the US bring an end to indentured servitude?
@PieterGeerkens: Incorporated your comment into my answer.
Jul
9
comment Did any nation have a demonstrable qualitative advantage in their soldiers of the 18th century, and how did they achieve this?
Sweden became a "big time military power" during the 30 Years' war based on French subsidies. Yes, it "punched above its weight" but its taste of "Great Power" status caused it to overreach later. During Queen Anne's War, either France or Britain would have gladly paid for their services, but they preferred war with Peter the Great instead.
Jun
30
comment Why was Germany unified in Versailles not Berlin?
@Bregalad: I "softened" my comments by saying that "some German states liked France more than others."
Jun
30
comment Why was Lithuania not colonized by Soviet Union?
@Anixx: Following your suggestion, I changed it to say that there was less incentive for the Soviet government to settle Russians in Vilnius, etc.
Jun
29
comment Why was Lithuania not colonized by Soviet Union?
@Anixx: "Most who migrated there were associated with industry, power production and navy..." And Lithuania was less desirable in this regard than the other two. Did I make that point clear in my post (regarding e.g. Lithuania's shorter coastline)?
Jun
28
comment Why do more historians state Rome was a superpower, than Persia?
@MarkC.Wallace: I changed the title. It's probably quantifiable that "more" historians referred to Rome as a superpower than Persia. At least that we know of.
Jun
27
comment Did Japan make a contribution to World War II way out of proportion to its estimated relative GDP?
@PieterGeerkens: Those are very good points that are greatly appreciated. That was basically what I was trying to find out (on a per country basis). Will you vote to reopen the question so that you can post your comments as an answer regarding your country, Canada?
Jun
25
comment Did Japan make a contribution to World War II way out of proportion to its estimated relative GDP?
@T.E.D.: This question has four votes to reopen. Will you be the fifth? It has considerably edited for clarity from its original version, and at least one closer (Mark Wallace) seems to like the current version. Several people seem to have potential answers, based on the comments. –
Jun
23
comment Did Japan make a contribution to World War II way out of proportion to its estimated relative GDP?
@Oldcat: Very interesting comment that would make a good answer. Why don't you vote to reopen (if you haven't already done so) and post this as an answer.
Jun
23
comment Did Japan make a contribution to World War II way out of proportion to its estimated relative GDP?
@Oldcat: According to this source, warchronicle.com/numbers/WWII/deaths.htm 10 million Chinese deaths, 5,000 for Ethiopia. Tragic for the latter, but not exactly comparable.
Jun
23
comment Why did the British “Indian” army come disproportionately from particular regions?
+1 and Accepted to for reference to Sepoy Rebellion of 1857.
Jun
22
comment Did Japan make a contribution to World War II way out of proportion to its estimated relative GDP?
@Oldcat: Japan started the war (against China) in 1937, if not 1931. America entered the war against Japan, Germany, and Italy within days of each other. Japan lasted two years longer than Italy at the back end, and three years longer at the front end, five years in all.
Jun
22
comment Did Japan make a contribution to World War II way out of proportion to its estimated relative GDP?
@MarkC.Wallace: In the (revised) question, Italy surrendered two years before Japan, and Japan's deployed forces came within "shouting distance" of Britain's, rather than being "one fourth." Thanks for any more help you can provide.