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18h
comment Are there any accounts of German junior enlisted soldiers surviving the siege of Stalingrad and subsequent captivity?
Being Austrian was helpful. They were considered "less bad" than the Germans by the Soviets, and were occasionally cut a break or two.
18h
comment Why did Gen. Lee (Civil War) surrender to the U.S?
@TechZen: I've been told that the term "draw a line in the sand" comes from the Alamo. Travis did this, and said that anyone who wanted to, could stay on the opposite side, leave and live. Anyone who crossed the line with him was volunteering for a certain death. Every man did so.
1d
comment Are there any accounts of German junior enlisted soldiers surviving the siege of Stalingrad and subsequent captivity?
@Alex: The German. I've studied both languages, but as you can see from my site statistics, my German is much better.
1d
comment Are there any accounts of German junior enlisted soldiers surviving the siege of Stalingrad and subsequent captivity?
@MarkC.Wallace: I meant a "buck" private. As opposed to an officer, a "non-com" or even private first class. I thought the context was clear, but maybe it wasn't.
1d
comment Why did the British leave Kohima and Imphal “lightly” defended in 1944?
@PieterGeerkens: Sounds like saying "the Germans aren't going to move into/through the Ardennes in force, so no need for more than a nominal defense force there."
2d
comment Why did the British leave Kohima and Imphal “lightly” defended in 1944?
@MichaelHardy: I meant "that's what people would have said then."
2d
comment What changed Japanese attitude to POWs in inter-war period?
No, it just means that it took us this long to recognize the value of your answer (because someone else answered the question).
2d
comment Did the Germans have enough bombers to conduct “strategic” bombing of the Soviet Union?
@Mustang: That is a good comment that approximates my thoughts. Why don't you make it into an answer that I'd likely upvote, and possibly accept?
2d
comment Was von Manstein's Lack of Success at Leningrad (and later Stalingrad) due to the failure of German military intelligence?
@PieterGeerkens: That is a good point. Why don't you put your comment into an answer that I'd likely upvote, and possibly accept.
Apr
26
comment Was von Manstein's Lack of Success at Leningrad (and later Stalingrad) due to the failure of German military intelligence?
@PeterDiehr: Shirer is not good for "hard" history. But as a journlist, he was good at picking up "scuttlebutt" such as rumors of underestimation of Soviet strength. Even Chief of Staff Franz Halder admitted to such underestimates.
Apr
26
comment Was von Manstein's Lack of Success at Leningrad (and later Stalingrad) due to the failure of German military intelligence?
I asked for the views of "historians" or other experts. Reputable Historian A believes this, or HIstorian B argues that are "facts," or "references" (about the historians), not opinions.
Apr
25
comment Did the Germans have enough bombers to conduct “strategic” bombing of the Soviet Union?
@Matt: I'd say that "prioritize" means "put into production." Prototypes don't really count.
Apr
25
comment Did the Germans have enough bombers to conduct “strategic” bombing of the Soviet Union?
@JonCuster: Your comments basically answer my question. Why not put them into an answer so I can upvote, and possibly accept them.
Apr
25
comment Did the Germans have enough bombers to conduct “strategic” bombing of the Soviet Union?
@JonCuster: That's a good reason not to undertake strategic bombing. So apparently, Germany didn't "prioritize" this.
Apr
24
comment How did the supplies shipped in winter over the “Road of Life” to Leningrad compare to those at other times of the year?
@SMSvonderTann: Thanks, fixed.
Apr
22
comment How does Upton Sinclair's The Jungle contribute to Historiography?
@SamanthaHutto: To use Dukakis' framework, I link "politics" to ideology, and "regulation" to "competence." tt's true that regulation has a political component, but this was the province of more "centrist" political policy makers. Sinclair was more of an "extremist," that is "socialist" rather than liberal or even "progressive." In this regard, his book failed to win many converts to socialism, but instead, became a rallying point for centrist "good government" types.
Apr
20
comment Who considered themselves as “Prussian”?
@OlePetersen: Because she told me.We talked quite a bit about our respective backgrounds.
Apr
18
comment Who considered themselves as “Prussian”?
@Bregalad: That's pretty much what I was taught.
Apr
18
comment Is there an instance where Rome adopted a weapon to win a war?
I have hopefully clarified the question and suggest that it NOT be closed.
Apr
18
comment Who considered themselves as “Prussian”?
@Bregalad: My response is that people are more likely to consider themselves Prussian based on geography rather than class. The reason class comes into play is because class distinctions become sharper the further east you go, so the more class conscious people tend to be the more "eastern" Germans. My source is this woman I dated in college almost 40 years ago (I'm that old.)