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Aug
21
comment Why did the Japanese expect the United States navy would attack the Home Islands?
The OP's question was: "The Japanese must have had some reason to believe that an attack was the only viable option for the Americans. What was that reason?" And the answer was, because they didn't envision an alternative. Or put another way, "because everyone else was doing it that way." Until the Americans didn't.
Aug
17
comment Did the Germans use a “Verdun”-like strategy at Stalingrad?
A good source for this is "Marching Orders" by Bruce Lee amazon.com/Marching-Orders-Untold-Story-World/dp/0306810360
Aug
17
comment Was the take off of neural computing research in the 80's due to Japan?
This question should probably be deleted, since it was asked and answered on the History of Science and Mathematics.
Aug
14
comment history of computing / computation in higher education
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because this is a better fit for History of Science and Mathematics.
Aug
14
comment Why did the United States enter World War I?
The Lusitania was sunk in 1915, not 1917, that is almost two YEARS before America entered the war, not two weeks.
Aug
12
comment What type of people were most likely to be suspected of witchcraft in Salem?
@Lohoris: Added last paragraph.
Aug
12
comment What type of people were most likely to be suspected of witchcraft in Salem?
@Lohoris: Actually, there was another factor. "Most" of the original accused were women. Several men were added late in the process to bring their number to six. So on a "time weighted" basis, "most" people were women.
Aug
11
comment Was it Bismarck who said: “He who is master of Bohemia is master of Europe”?
This goes to the so-called "Heartland" thesis of Britain's HJ Mackinder, that whichever "end" power, Germany or Russia, dominated eastern Europe, would dominate the heartland of Eurasia. Bohemia was the single most important piece of eastern Europe, relative to its size.
Aug
10
comment Where does the employer / employee deference, subservient relationship come from?
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because I would migrate this to another site, such as SE Law.
Aug
10
comment Why did the Japanese expect the United States navy would attack the Home Islands?
@Schwern: "War Plan Orange" was how Japanese (and Americans) THOUGHT the Americans would behave. But they acted differently.The Wikipedia on War Plan Orange itself says, "American war planners failed to appreciate that technological advances in submarines and naval aviation had made Mahan's doctrine obsolete. In particular, they did not understand that aircraft could effectively sink battleships, nor that Japan might put the US battleship force (the Battle Line) out of action at a stroke—as in fact happened during Pearl Harbor. American plans changed after this attack. "
Aug
9
comment Why did the Japanese expect the United States navy would attack the Home Islands?
@IanRingrose: In his 1943 State of the Union Speech, President Franklin D. Roosevelt reported that American planes were shooting down Japanese planes at a rate of 4 to 1. Given American anger over the "sneak attack" at Pearl Harbor, that was more than acceptable. The Americans (probably) would have accepted 500,000 dead at the expense of 2 million dead Japanese.
Aug
8
comment What kinds of WW2 POWs were treated best?
@FelixGoldberg: Compare the German treatment of British and Russian prisoners and understand that the Poles got the "best" of the deal. General B-Z explained to his men that Germany was about to lose the war, and they needed all the "friends" they could get.
Jul
28
comment What made Stalingrad a turning point in the second world war?
@PieterGeerkens: If you make that argument, then even Midway would be a high water mark, not a decisive battle. The four carriers the Japanese lost there pale in comparison to the fact that the U.S. built the equivalent of the Japanese fleet every 18 months. But I was following the "conventional" wisdom that Stalingrad was one of three turning point (in your-speak) "high-water mark" battles. I edited my answer to make this point.
Jul
26
comment What did Germany do in World War II about the different rail gauge in the Soviet Union?
@LightnessRacesinOrbit: Ok, added link.
Jul
25
comment What does “the purpose of history is ideological” mean?
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it seems to be a homework question.
Jul
25
comment What did Germany do in World War II about the different rail gauge in the Soviet Union?
@lejonet: That's "common knowledge" (among World War II buffs).
Jul
22
comment Why didn't Stalin use force to bring Tito into line?
possible duplicate of What was the reason for Soviet troops to withdraw from Yugoslavia in World War II?
Jul
22
comment Have governments or combatants marked the houses of groups to be persecuted?
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it appears to be about a conspiracy theory.
Jul
19
comment Why were we taught virtually nothing about the Holocaust during the fifties and sixties?
@MarkC.Wallace: I had the same experience, born 1957, and more to the point, there appears to be an answer, see my post below.
Jul
12
comment Did the increase of slavery in the US bring an end to indentured servitude?
@PieterGeerkens: Incorporated your comment into my answer.