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I have been using VBA (for excel) for years, but i'm new to html, css and php. would one day like to integrate excel with a web site of my own design.


Dec
12
comment Did the civil wars of 17th century England facilitate an independent spirit in the American colonies?
All interesting points, but not what I asked. Certainly the notion of rebellion and the emphasis on representative bodies effected the colonies. I'm asking if the turmoil in England let to a de facto Laissez-faire policy toward the Colonies.
Dec
8
comment Historical examples of energy wars
Any of the Assyrian expansion due to need for timber? The epic of Gilgamesh talks about conquest of a forest.
Nov
16
comment When were the 'last' pagans in northern Europe converted to christianity?
@MarkC.Wallace - I understand protestantism is not paganism. I'm suggesting that many ethnic groups have adopted their own form of christianity. History is typically taught suggesting the protestant reformation took place based on ideological differences. In fact, I think, it took place largely along ethnic lines.
Nov
16
comment When were the 'last' pagans in northern Europe converted to christianity?
@PieterGeerkens How is the question deeper? I find the subject of long lasting ethnic differences in europe fascinating. It's really interesting that differences between Celts and Germanic peoples lasted (continue to last?) so long.
Nov
16
comment When were the 'last' pagans in northern Europe converted to christianity?
@LennartRegebro I apologize for any confusion. My headline question is really the question I want answered. The information below is just for context. I consider 1517 the beginning of the official rejection Catholicism. All I'm missing is the 'end' of Paganism to see how long Catholicism lasted in norther Europe.
May
3
comment Why were people from the Asian Steppes able to militarily dominate Europeans on a repeated basis?
@T.E.D., I think we're saying the same thing. I'm just curious about why the Steppe was the repeated source of military invention/creation. It sounds like you're saying pastoralism as a cultural solution lead to this long term trend.
May
3
comment Why were people from the Asian Steppes able to militarily dominate Europeans on a repeated basis?
@T.E.D. Great detail to add. But, I feel like it adds to my point. There seemed to be an ebb and flow with the stepp. But in generally, the pressure tented to be from the east, to the west, on horseback, using military inovation/advantage (golden bow, stirrup, tactics..etc.). Could it just be the geography? i.e. your front narrows as you head west, but widens as you head east?
May
3
comment Why were people from the Asian Steppes able to militarily dominate Europeans on a repeated basis?
@Odysseus, To me, Rome, and the Macedonians before, were exceptions to a larger trend. In addition, both were focused on the Levant. Yes, Alexander went further, but his stay was cut short. As TimAu pointed out, the eurasian stepp proved to be a cradle for horse-powered marauding to the more settled cultures in China and Europe. I just find it interesting that repeated military dominance never ended up fully conquering permanent new land (east or west), nor fully disappearing until the late middle ages. Unless, the Turkick peoples count as a part of this overall trend.
May
3
comment Why were people from the Asian Steppes able to militarily dominate Europeans on a repeated basis?
While I appreciate your suggestion, I think the crusades are an important qualifier to the question. My point is that Europeans were not without any desire/ability to expand. So, lack of motivation can't be the answer. Unless, of course, you believe the Crusades were a purely religious endeavor.
May
3
comment Why were people from the Asian Steppes able to militarily dominate Europeans on a repeated basis?
The Goths are not what I'm asking about. The goths, as far as I know, were pushed west by Huns from the east. It's the Huns' ability to dominate the Goths that is part of my question. Why didn't the Goths push the Huns into China?
Aug
21
comment Any notable battles fought with steel vs. bronze weapons?
I'm going to ask this elsewhere, but I'm curious if the use of bronze vs the use of iron, given the the incremental nature of metallurgical envelopment, is as relevant durring 'that' period in the levant (?1200BC to 800bc?) as proliferation in written language (Homer, Dueteronomy, Mahabharata..etc.).