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7h
comment What was the name of the father of Mesha, king of Moab?
Dear Reb, at least the Czech translation is from a 2011 paper in Czech in Studia Theologica, cejsh.icm.edu.pl/cejsh/element/… - I don't have access to the full text of the paper right now but I believe that it should contain the Hebrew version of the text as well. ... No idea about dots. The next line could be too late to fix the possible reader's misconception that it's the Chemosh God who is talked about.
20h
answered What was the name of the father of Mesha, king of Moab?
23h
comment Where, exactly, was the “Sudetenland?”
It's bizarre for you to mention physics forums which has nothing to do with this history Stack Exchange. I am roughly the 2nd most reputable user on the brotherly Physics Stack Exchange forum, the only public forum on physics where I was spending time in recent years, and if you want to take the side of some combative yet deluded users over there who argue with me, be my guest but that only helps to highlight your inadequacy as a user of these forums and indeed, as a human being.
23h
comment Where, exactly, was the “Sudetenland?”
It was not ethnic cleansing by any stretch of imagination. It was the most human and sensible solution to solve the previous problems with 2mln citizens who had committed treason on that territory, a solution that was supported by the victorious powers in the World War II, and a solution that remains a part of the Czech law to this day. If you question it, you are really violating our law and indeed, it's more appropriate for you to interact with prison guards rather than myself in that case. And it's also rather clear that the motivation for doing so is based on your sympathies for Nazism.
23h
comment Where, exactly, was the “Sudetenland?”
Yup, thanks for the maps, I upvoted the answer - and I should have embedded the map myself before you. ;-)
1d
comment Gibbon Edward biography in czech or slovak language
Dear @Moniko, are you familiar at least with the Czech Wikipedia page on him? cs.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Gibbon Also, his book on the Fall of the Roman Empire was published in Czech as GIBBON, Edward. Úpadek a pád římské říše: výbor. Příprava vydání Jiří Klabouch, Vladimír Vavřínek; překlad Adolf Felix. 1. vyd. Praha : Odeon, 1983. 404 s. It's easier now to buy the Slovak translation: heureka.cz/?h[fraze]=Edward+Gibbon heureka.sk/?h[fraze]=Edward+Gibbon
1d
comment Where, exactly, was the “Sudetenland?”
To claim that there existed any serious justification for the Sudetenland Germans' complaints means to play a very dirty game according to Adolf Hitler's recipes. But it just happened. 90% of the Sudeten Germans fell in love with Henlein's local subsidiary of NSDAP and they decided to work hard to destroy Czechoslovakia and for 6 years or so, they succeeded. They were unquestionably among the losers - and culprits - of the Second World War and the tensions had to be fixed, macroscopic justice had to be imposed, and they had to be expelled. There couldn't have been doubts about it.
1d
comment Where, exactly, was the “Sudetenland?”
The Czech kingdom was a totally unified state without any internal borders for some 1,000 years. Despite this fact, it didn't really have any autonomy within Austria-Hungary, and no one whined. Czechoslovakia just copied the similar arrangement at a smaller scale - while Germans became a minority. But all of their rights were perfectly respected - even more so than Czechs' rights within Austria. Among all German minorities outside Germany in the whole world, they had by far the highest number of schools, books, newspapers, deputies in the Parliament, and so on and so on.
1d
comment Where, exactly, was the “Sudetenland?”
Marakai, yours is a bizarre selection from the Nazi propaganda books. First, the Czech kingdom has existed as a major feudal entity for a millennium. Sometimes, Habsburgs or other ethnic Germans were the Czech kings but there was never any doubts that Prague was a major center that governed the country including the "Sudetenland". So it's bizarre to call the Sudeten Germans "top dogs" prior to 1918. We lived in a multi-cultural monarchy. Also, it's crazy to talk about the Sudetenland autonomy. There was no justification for such a thing.
1d
revised Where, exactly, was the “Sudetenland?”
added 254 characters in body
1d
answered Where, exactly, was the “Sudetenland?”
1d
comment Rename 'Byzantine Empire' the Eastern Roman Empire, or Eastern Rome?
When I want to call my company Microsoft, it doesn't mean that other people will respect my wish. It's a natural convention to assign the simplest names to the most important entities. And the Roman Empire etc. simply refers to the entities during the golden epochs of the states with similar names. The Byzantine Empire doesn't belong to that golden Roman epoch which is why people usually prefer some other name. The U.S. will probably always keep the name because it's analogous to the Western Roman Empire. It's others, less important countries, who won't be allowed to hijack the USA brand.
May
1
revised Nazi-Germany unemployment?
added 546 characters in body
May
1
comment What did 'regular' medieval people think about royalty?
Right, regular people knew their place and the special status of the aristocracy etc. - which was almost the rule. Today, regular people are brainwashed spoiled brats encouraged by various populist politicians and pundits to think that they are the belly of the world and the higher-status people are never better, at most thieves.
Apr
30
comment Nazi-Germany unemployment?
Banks worked much like elsewhere - many of the banks were actually privatized, not nationalized, during Nazism, so Nazism kept the financial industry largely in similar conditions as elsewhere in the capitalist world - but there was nothing original about these steps. Similar privatizations and conditions existed in many other countries. I am just fascinated by the fascination of some people like you by the "wonderful" regime. Its being wonderful was largely a matter of propaganda. People felt happy - to be members of the higher race even they had often nothing else to be proud about.
Apr
30
comment Nazi-Germany unemployment?
It was obviously convenient and good for the economy that they could have banned strikes and other aspects of work of labor unions - I am obviously generally for "this direction" - but it also had some price to pay for the workers. And Volkswagen? What was that great about the conditions in which VW worked then relatively to how it works today, for example? Or how Ford or GM or Laurin&Klement (which would be bought by VW in 1991 LOL) worked at the same time? Hitler claimed some credit for something that wasn't really his. That's the main difference.
Apr
30
comment Nazi-Germany unemployment?
For some broader remarks about the Nazi German economy, see e.g. this general page en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Economy_of_Nazi_Germany - the budget deficit leading to your wonderful GDP figure of 1938 was astronomical, e.g. 38 billion marks of deficit in 1939. No country could routinely sustain a similar system and something "bad" such as the war was needed for this German system to sustain itself - for several more years - even from the economic viewpoint. ... What are the good lessons you want to learn from any of your examples? Nothing was great yet original about the Nazi banks.
Apr
30
comment Nazi-Germany unemployment?
This shouldn't be about Czechoslovakia, however. An important point is that the economic changes of Germany of the 1930s were unsustainable, driven by things that simply couldn't last. The investments into military+troops was a part of it, and those needed to be repaid by expansionism that was pretty much guaranteed to lead to a lost war at some moment. The true sustainable economic boom only started in the post-war German economic miracle.
Apr
30
comment Nazi-Germany unemployment?
The superiority was also clean in 1924. The well-known table in Czechia penize.cz/ekonomika/244016-nas-ucet-za-komunismus says that the top GDP-per-capita countries in 1924 were, in this order: US, Canada, Australia, Switzerland, Argentina, Britain, France, Sweden, Belgium, and Czechoslovakia. If one would separate Czechia and Slovakia (and removed Ruthenia, too), Czechia of 1924 would match France or Sweden at the 7th-8th spot. Germany, Austria were way lower in those tables. This may have helped to create the bad mood for Nazism but Nazism was primarily erasing the gap.
Apr
30
comment Nazi-Germany unemployment?
OK, the 1938 number is clearly a bogus number - it may remove the Sudetenland from Czechoslovakia. We had the same GDP per capita e.g. in the mid 1930s and probably higher GDP per capita than Germany in 1930 or early 1930s. This was contributed by the incredible boom, e.g. 10% and 12% GDP growth of Czechoslovakia in 1927, 1929, respectively dejinyasoucasnost.cz/archiv/2008/3/nase-zlata-leta - the timing is different, but the point you are trying to make that this Nazi big-government system beats democracy is just totally and fatally wrong. It's undeniably economically inferior.