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Sep
1
comment Why did Emperor Constantine believe he was a instrument of God?
@SamuelRussell If you view this as a question about whether the idea of the emperor as "God's instrument" was somehow derived from the former pagan notions of the divinity of the emperor then this would be a legit questions, I think, of the history of ideas kind. Actually, even as a question about Constantine's personal beliefs, as known to us, this might be legit, though probably not really answerable as such. But perhaps OP needs to clarify a bit what exactly he had meant.
Aug
31
comment How common was banditry in 16th & 17th century Great Britain and Ireland?
Very excellent answer. A question: what is the "economic turmoil that has afflicted England ever since the Tudor accession"? Wasn't the Tudor accession conducive to growth, simply by ending the civil wars? As evidence, consider the regularly lavish expenditures of Henry VIII - they would have been impossible without a prosperous country yielding regular taxes. Or am I missing something here?
Aug
27
comment Is this true that the Russian economy was efficient during war II?
@user4419802 Check out en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Molotov%E2%80%93Ribbentrop_Pact and en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… and see for yourself who was Germany's closest ally at the time....
Aug
27
comment Did anything come from Sparta, besides fitness and war?
Tyrtaeus the Spartan poet comes to mind but, alas, his poetry is about "exhorting Spartans to support the state authorities and to fight bravely against the Messenians". So I guess I'll keep looking for another answer :)
Aug
25
comment Korean DMZ Soldiers
Well, the guy in the sun must be envying the guy in the shade opposite him.
Aug
24
comment Is this true that the Russian economy was efficient during war II?
Not to put too find a point on it, but if one stretches the Soviet involvement to WWII to the Winter War or the Invasion of Poland, then it's worth pointing out that the Soviets began the war fighting on the Nazi side and only switched later...
Aug
23
revised Why were the 8th Route Army better at fighting the Japanese than the Nationalists were?
edited body
Aug
18
comment What were contemporary Japanese views on the Taiping Rebellion and Heavenly Kingdom?
You've beaten me to it! I was going to write an answer, based on this book: books.google.co.il/… (esp. p 91). Did you use it?
Aug
18
comment Did the Romans ever deploy troops to, or try to conquer, Ireland?
This is very interesting but I am a bit puzzled by the notion of Gaelic "forts". As far as I know, they did not have the kind of strong centralized authority which is usually needed to ensure that so many forts are built, maintened and manned. What is the source of the graphic? +1 anyway for the new angle!
Aug
18
comment How widespread was the practice of chaining slave rowers to the ships?
@Oldcat Well, that was exactly the point of my answer, I think..
Aug
17
comment What happened to the stuff stolen from the Temple in Jerusalem by the Romans?
P.S. You might want to reword the title. It was not "stolen" but something like "plundered".
Aug
17
comment What happened to the stuff stolen from the Temple in Jerusalem by the Romans?
You might also be interested in my old question: history.stackexchange.com/questions/6151/…
Aug
17
answered What happened to the stuff stolen from the Temple in Jerusalem by the Romans?
Aug
16
comment Did the Romans ever deploy troops to, or try to conquer, Ireland?
Actually, the Romans didn't even conquer Scotland.
Aug
15
comment Is there any support within the scholarly community for Cyrus Gordon's “Common Background of Greek and Hebrew Civilizations”?
What custom became common under the Hebrews?
Aug
13
answered Is there any support within the scholarly community for Cyrus Gordon's “Common Background of Greek and Hebrew Civilizations”?
Aug
13
comment What documentary evidence is there that Roman crucifixion victims were completely nude?
@TylerDurden Presumably, it has not changed much in the intervening years.
Aug
13
comment What documentary evidence is there that Roman crucifixion victims were completely nude?
@TylerDurden I am not splitting hairs at all here - my apologies if you got that impression. My point is that specifically the gospels (unlike other later Christian texts) are both ancient and Christian. They were written before 200 CE (certainly before Origen) and so they depict the realities of the era OP is asking about. Whether they are true, partially true, or complete fiction is irrelevant, by the way: if we consider them "historical novels", then we can safely assume their authors would have used credible details their readers could relate to.
Aug
13
comment What documentary evidence is there that Roman crucifixion victims were completely nude?
@TylerDurden Ok, so anything before 313 (at the very least) is ancient by your definition?
Aug
13
comment What documentary evidence is there that Roman crucifixion victims were completely nude?
@TylerDurden What's not ancient about the gospels?