Reputation
9,406
Next tag badge:
89/100 score
14/20 answers
Badges
3 24 61
Impact
~192k people reached

2d
comment What was Finland's role in the siege of Leningrad?
Erm, I looked up Lunde's book on amazon and while it has received many favourable reviews, I also found out that the author admits to not reading Russian - or Finnish! That rather diminishes the book's value as a source, especially one that offers a radically new interpretation. Just my 2 cents.
2d
comment What was Finland's role in the siege of Leningrad?
+1 but you might want to consider removing the second quote, as it adds nothing new. It;s enough, imho, to say that Lunde's book contains similar assertions.
2d
comment What was Finland's role in the siege of Leningrad?
@jamesqf That's because it was rolled back again...
May
18
comment Was the money requested by the French for the XYZ affair really a bribe?
I've done some really basic editing. Hopefully, the OP or others can do more.
May
18
revised Was the money requested by the French for the XYZ affair really a bribe?
added 12 characters in body
May
14
comment Why were the Germans and Russians so fixated on an unlikely “separate peace” in 1945?
@ThorstenS. I don't think SJuan believes this crazy stuff himself, he was just explaining how Stalin might have thought.
May
14
comment Why were the Germans and Russians so fixated on an unlikely “separate peace” in 1945?
@SJuan76 You've done a great job showing how the mind of a paranoid creep like Stalin worked :) Pity that many ostensibly sane people in Russia today have swallowed this shit hook and sinker....
May
13
comment Why were the Germans and Russians so fixated on an unlikely “separate peace” in 1945?
@SJuan76 Don't forget the lend-lease, though.
May
11
comment What do Florence, Genoa, Milan and Venice have in common?
There was no central Guelph authority. It's a bit like saying that the Liberal parties in the UK, Canada and Australia form a "common rule" - they don't.
May
4
comment What do Florence, Genoa, Milan and Venice have in common?
Just to make sure - did Eridania have offices in other major cities?
May
2
comment Did early nineteenth century commoners know their royalty?
Plus, monarchs usually appeared on coins.
May
2
accepted Ethnic Germans in Russian service in Poland
Apr
25
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
21
comment Who was the highest ranking spy ever?
PS T. was never a cardinal. He had been a bishop before the Revolution but gave up his clerical rank.
Apr
21
answered Who was the highest ranking spy ever?
Apr
21
comment Who was the highest ranking spy ever?
@Oldcat Well, to be sure, there was an old European practice of the government of country X paying "pensions" to statesmen of country Y. Receipt of such a pension was not considered treasonable as long as there was no open war declared between X and Y. However, the pensions were not bandied about too much. Today this would be called "lobbying fees" probably. The old times were just a bit franker. Now, one must note that the standards of diplomatic propriety had been rising so I don't know if Talleyrand's carrying on was egregious by his time's standard or not.
Apr
20
comment Presidents of the French Tribunate from 1799 to 1807
Perhaps the presidency was annually rotating? Then it might be the case that you have a chronological list on your hands actually.
Apr
19
comment Why did the French nobility adopt Calvinism?
Sounds reasonable but then you'd still have to explain why some aristocracies opted for Lutheranism and not Calvinism...
Apr
17
comment Did native Mexicans prefer Spanish rulers to the Aztecs?
Yes, that׳s what I meant. @NikolayNenov
Apr
17
revised How did Americans' hatred of taxes shape the country up through the Gilded Age?
edited body