751 reputation
17
bio website
location Surrey, United Kingdom
age
visits member for 1 year, 10 months
seen Jan 24 '13 at 9:53

I have a BA Hons degree in typographic design and Masters degree in business administration. I worked in the publishing industry for 30 years as a setter, copy editor and proof reader, before moving into management. Now semi-retired.

My main interest areas are cookery, cricket, and reading/writing.


Dec
20
comment Was Churchill a poor HR manager?
@FelixGoldberg I'm aware of that, but like Churchill, his interference hindered the war effort, not improved it. Russia was eventually successful, but that was down soley to the quality of some of their generals and their massive resources rather than anything to do with Stalin. Bear in mind when Germany invaded, they were utterly ill prepared and suffered many losses, despite Stalin knowing that it was likely to happen. He just hoped it wouldn't.
Dec
20
comment Was Churchill a poor HR manager?
@FelixGoldberg It's been a while since I read the books that contained references to Churchills leadership abilities and I'd have to re-read those sections to give you more specific answers. I do remember however, that he was a politician first and foremost and the second world war was won despite his interference rather than because of it. Re Stalin, he was just a dictator, his military leadership was non existent.
Dec
19
comment Was Churchill a poor HR manager?
@FelixGoldberg Wrong place at the wrong time, it was too heavily defended and there were other better options. Churchill was a poor politician and even worse military leader.
Dec
19
comment Was Churchill a poor HR manager?
I don't know whether Churchill was specifically poor at HR, but he did have poor judgement. He was somewhat gungho and didn't think through the implications of his actions aka Gallipoli was simply poor judgement, in other words he got it wrong.
Dec
16
comment Did “droit du seigneur” actually exist in medieval Europe?
@YannisRizos I can't see the point in asking and answering your own question. If he knew the answer to it, why did he ask it? If after several days the question had no answers and the OP decided to research the question and answer it, fair enough. But the answer appeared almost immediately after the question was asked, no-one else was given an opportunity to answer it. It just seems a convenient way to bump up his own rep to me.
Dec
16
comment How does Göbekli Tepe fit into the current picture of society development?
@Anubhav I'm not sure why you don't understand that comment. In mans evolution, first came the hunter gathers who were nomads that roamed hunting for their food sources. Nomads because they had no base, they kept moving. At some point they stopped being hunter gathers and became farmers - putting down roots in one place and growing food rather than roaming. The date of the Göbekli Tepe settlement puts it at about 500 years before historians assumed the switch from hunter gathers to farmers took place.
Dec
14
awarded  Custodian
Dec
14
comment How does Göbekli Tepe fit into the current picture of society development?
What relevance are the Kwakiutl, Nootka, and Tlingit Indians to a society that lived in 10,000 BC? The time frames are many Millenniums apart! The Göbekli Tepe excavation shows a society living in one place 500 years before the first recorded instances of villages subsisting on agriculture and they're not living next to a sea full of fish! This find challenges pre-conceived notions of hunter-gathers switching to agriculture by at least 500 years, how can you say it doesn't change the picture much? What nonsense!
Dec
13
revised How does Göbekli Tepe fit into the current picture of society development?
reworded second paragraph that was difficult to understand
Dec
13
suggested suggested edit on How does Göbekli Tepe fit into the current picture of society development?
Dec
13
awarded  Supporter
Dec
13
comment What Factors Have Led to the Duration of US Copyrights Continuously Increasing?
@StevenDrennon Excellent answer, right on the money.
Dec
12
comment Wiliam Wallace vs. Robert Bruce: Why Did One Win and One Lose?
I would question the validity of the opinion regarding inexperienced archers given in this answer. English longbow archers were trained from a very early age to shoot the English longbow, the muscles in the string arm needed to be significantly strengthened to draw the string to the required position, as well as the practiced ability to fire the arrow at the intended target rapidly and without thought. A longbow archer can either shoot a longbow or he can't, there is no 'inexperience'.
Dec
12
comment Wiliam Wallace vs. Robert Bruce: Why Did One Win and One Lose?
@mgb I accept your view on the efficacy of compound bows v yew longbows, but don't agree with regards to the yew longbow continuing to work in the rain. Once the string (and replacement string) got wet (if it was raining) the longbow ceased to function. Archers carried several spare strings but would not keep any of them dry if it was pouring with rain. Hence the longbow becomes ineffective as a weapon in wet weather.
Dec
11
comment Which lost historical documents, when uncovered, led to the most substantial revisions in historiography?
It's an interesting question but I think far too wide ranging to be able to give a specific answer to and for that reason I don't think it's a very good fit with the FAQ.
Dec
11
comment Were the British Over-Taxing their 13 American Colonies?
This doesn't answer the question! The OP specifically stated he did not want a cause of the War of Independence! So what does he get? The cause!
Dec
11
comment Wiliam Wallace vs. Robert Bruce: Why Did One Win and One Lose?
@mgb I think you've got that the wrong way round. Yew long bows are more efficient that hide sinew bows but stop working when the string gets wet.
Dec
11
comment Wiliam Wallace vs. Robert Bruce: Why Did One Win and One Lose?
@TomAu Can you explain why you feel the Mongol bowmen were less effective in Europe? As far as I'm aware, they didn't lose any battles in Europe, so what's the reason?
Dec
10
answered What is the basis of Russian criticism of Antony Beevor's work?
Dec
10
answered Stalingrad - the German perspective?