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  • 0 posts edited
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  • 101 votes cast
Jan
21
comment Why were the Germans and Russians so fixated on an unlikely “separate peace” in 1945?
This answer desperately needs proofreading and formatting improvement, otherwise it seems to be barely comprehensible. Some prooflinks would be also helpful.
Nov
21
comment Did anyone besides Heinz Guderian believe that Germany needed to “liberate” Soviets to prevail on the eastern front?
According to Viktor Suvorov, the "Soviet" Russia was preparing to an offensive war in July 1941. The vast majority of its weapons and trained soldiers were concentrated on the border and destroyed or captured in the first months after German invasion. Suvorov then argues that the key factor of why the German offensives were halted was American and British deliveries to the Russia. So, does your question assume the period before or after Lend-Lease deliveries started (Oct 01, 1941)?
Nov
15
comment Was there any terrorism in the Soviet Union?
@NeMo, you define terrorism as killing for political reasons, except when government does. Hence, if two Russians drink vodka, have argument about whether to bomb Jerusalem first or Washington, and then one of them kills another with a knife — this would match your criteria, but this is obviously not terrorism.
Nov
15
comment Was there any terrorism in the Soviet Union?
-1: This answer badly needs prooflinks and credible references. „Many people“, „some people“, and „apparently inspired“ are just bareword statements that have nothing to do with history (and History.SE).
Nov
15
comment Was there any terrorism in the Soviet Union?
What is your definition of terrorism? There are several of those, but looking into your rationale, it seems that you have yet another definition of it? For example, considering the last sentence, when two alcohol-poisoned Russians have a dispute about what country to bomb first, and this ends up with a knife party, would this qualify?
Oct
11
comment Why did people in the USSR participate in elections?
@Anixx, any evidence of these multi-ballots have been prevalent? and again, any evidence of ballots with blank lines to fill? The original question is about the real soviet Russia, not about someone's fantasies about it.
Oct
11
comment Why did people in the USSR participate in elections?
(1) looks contradictory: what is "strike all the candidates" if there's only one? Also, there was no place in the ballot for writing your own candidate; all candidates must have been approved before the elections; I have seen a ballot with blank line only once, during „elections“ of a director of kolhoz (kind of 100 voters who lived in a single village), but definitely, that was not mainstream; (2) is an anecdotal evidence which hardly can prove anything.
Oct
11
comment Why did people in the USSR participate in elections?
@Bregalad, the difference between Russian regime and Marx' ideas is much bigger than between Kommunism and Communism.
Oct
9
comment Alexander Nevsky's helmet
@user907860, which one are you referring to? Muscovy (1283–1547) or Tsardom of Muscovy (1547–1721)?
Oct
9
comment Why did people in the USSR participate in elections?
@Anixx, I never claimed that a „low-class“ Soviet could successfully file a „donos“ against a „high-class“ Kommunist party member. Instead, the only way how an average person could make any influence on the system were those, let me say, „elections“. This is what my answer is about. Sorry to say, but I see numerous times you are jumping into discussions without prior reading the questions/answers you're disputing. Please take your time and read my answer. I love comments of KGB-fans, but only when these comments are based on facts.
Oct
9
comment Why did people in the USSR participate in elections?
@Anixx, filing a „donos“ on your non-voting slum neighbor is a different thing to an average person's reporting on an „elected“ Kommunist party member. The former was widespread, the latter probably exists only in fantasies of those who miss the Soviet Russia.
Oct
8
comment Why did people in the USSR participate in elections?
@Anixx, while this may not be the case in Russia itself, it was normal in occupied countries. For instance, in Ukraine of 1970's-80's: the 1st candidate was a local, Ukrainian national who arguably could lobby local interests on a „republican“ level. If he/she resigned (usually, due to „donos“), the 2nd one was sent from the Russia. There are plenty of evidences about this practice, for instance, in memories of Leo Kravchuk, ex-2nd secretary of the Kommunist Party of Ukrainian „Soviet Republic“, then the 1st President of Ukraine.
Oct
5
comment What role if any did Ligachev play in the 1991 coup attempt against Gorbachev?
The argument of the answer does not seem to be valid: (1) the coup has been prepared for almost 1½ years, and Ligachev obviously was not hospitalized all that time; (2) Yakovlev in his memories (А.Н. Яковлев "Омут памяти") clearly says that Ligachev was one of the ideologists of the neo-soviet coup of GKChP ("gang of eight"), albeit he did not become a member of the gang.
Sep
20
comment What happened to US's Lend-Lease machinery given to the Soviet Union?
Although many may consider linking Wikipedia as bad manners, :) dare to say that the question of LL repayment seems to be perfectly explained in Wikipedia.
Sep
15
comment Why was the Soviet Union unable to stop the violence in Nagorno-Karabakh?
@user4419802, my "conspiracy theory" is backed with credible references and reputable analysts. I realize there may be other sources, as credible as mine, to back the opposing statements, but unfortunately you failed to provide with one.
Sep
15
comment Why was the Soviet Union unable to stop the violence in Nagorno-Karabakh?
@NeMo: Attacking with pre-existing troops is much easier than cross-border invasion. See what happened in Abkhazia, South Ossetia, and Adjara (the latter — unsuccessfully). Then — Crimea and Donets'k/Luhans'k.
Sep
15
comment Why was the Soviet Union unable to stop the violence in Nagorno-Karabakh?
Adrian, your idea in understandable, but the answer lacks any credible references. The last statement about "top priorities" seems to be totally untrue. Many analysts say that Karabakh/Nakhchivan settlement (by exchange of exclaves) is the key to peace in entire Caucasus region: both religious (Christians vs. Muslims) and economical (oil and gas pipeline to Iran→Turkey→Europe). This is exactly why the Russia needs a war there.