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Apr
19
comment How can we be sure that a certain historical claim is true and accurate?
@T.E.D. : note, that this can go both ways. One can question a theory by pointing it out that some groups could have gained an advantage by propagating it, but this shouldn't be taken alone as a definitive proof against it. The modern discrediting claim can be influenced by one's ideological views just as the original theory was. Yes, someone back then could have had an interest in playing up or down something, but just the same, someone today might have an interest in presenting that past group as liars.
Apr
18
comment Why do the horses on this vase have too many legs?
Or they are pairwise perfectly in sync, so two of the heads are hidden
Apr
15
comment Was Jesus unique from the point of view of contemporaries?
@NeMo : the view that the effect of Jesus was not significantly greater on the history of the world than the effect of other religious leaders in that era is very strange, but I agree that that's not the point here. Why I mentioned this in the 2nd paragraph was to stop the question from being misunderstood. I didn't want answers and comments about the effect of Jesus on our current society. And by careful wording and notes I tried to discourage people from answering solely to express their views about religion. Despite this, many still couldn't resist the temptation to do so.
Apr
11
comment Was Jesus unique from the point of view of contemporaries?
@Anaryl : I suspect you are overly confrontational and are assuming too much about my person. It wasn't me who downvoted this answer and if you don't believe me, you can ask a moderator. If I find a post which is very well and coherently explained and shows significant effort, I usually upvote it, even if I don't agree with everything in it. Why I didn't upvote this, is because it's short (basically just a copy of a comment), and doesn't show any effort to explain the topic. This was my guess why someone might have downvoted it.
Apr
11
comment Was Jesus unique from the point of view of contemporaries?
I wasn't the one who downvoted it, but I guess it was because of the lack of any reference, and because of very little effort being put into the answer (it basically copied a comment). I guess if you expanded the answer, explained it in more detail, people would upvote it.
Apr
11
comment Was Jesus unique from the point of view of contemporaries?
Almost all serious historians accept the existence of Jesus as a person (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Historical_Jesus), and most of your "answer" seems to be not much more than ranting.
Apr
10
awarded  Famous Question
Apr
8
comment Was the U.S. Civil War unique regarding its relation to slavery? (people fighting for the freedom of a goup they were not part of)
@Αδριανός : were people in Nazi Germany used as slaves in the classical sense, bought and sold, openly by the general population? Please read the whole title, and the question itself, not just part of the title. If we only took the last part of the title out of context, then every single war where a power helped one side of a civil war in a different country would count.
Apr
8
comment Where are the ancient books now?
@Michael : you really thought that posting a link will make people accept your claim without following it, right? You wrote "many of them by Early Middle Ages Christians" Of the 22 book burnings listed, exactly one was done by early medieval Christians, and even that one didn't contain knowledge from the Classical Era, but contemporary esoteric writings. Some of the others among the list were done by late medieval Europeans, but exactly zero of them were about books from Antiquity. Zero. All of them were contemporary controversial fringe esoteric or theological writings.
Apr
8
comment Where are the ancient books now?
@Michael : However, if your theory were true (burning books and libraries of past eras just because they were pagans) then how come they respected many Roman and Greek writers? There is plenty of proof they did. So, to get back on topic, I contested the claim of the OP that "antique philosophers were rejected as atheists" which is simply not true.
Apr
8
comment Where are the ancient books now?
@Michael : yeah, and they also taught that the Earth is flat and murdered everyone who dared to say it's round, right? You can google it and find a lot of people claiming it. And it's still not true, and no serious historian believes it. To get back to the point: yes, of course, those times had seen a lot of wars, and yes, sometimes violence was motivated by religion (but usually motivated by power and wealth - like everywhere in the world).
Apr
8
comment Where are the ancient books now?
Antique philosophers were not "rejected as atheists". If you believe it to be so, you might have serious biases about the European Middle Ages. They were not as close-minded as you might think. They valued the useful information even if written by someone who might not have believed exactly what they believed. Instead of wiping out all that remained from the ancient Greek and Roman era, they took care to preserve it. Without Christian monasteries also copying ancient literature, much less of it would have survived to this day. Especially Aristotle was held in high regard by the Church.
Apr
8
comment Was Jesus unique from the point of view of contemporaries?
@StevenBurnap : Actually, I would guess an answer would be about being in some ways not unique, mentioning sources about different messiah claimants, while possibly mentioning some aspects which might have been more unique. I guess there would be several similarities but also several differences, I just lack the expertise to know where to get the most useful sources and pieces of information from.
Apr
8
comment Was Jesus unique from the point of view of contemporaries?
@StevenBurnap : indeed, even the Bible mentions that there were and will be false prophets and false messiahs, and it can be a starting point, but I was more interested in the similarity in lifestyle, methods and behavior. (So, did someone who got interested in the teachings of Jesus was typically like "I've listened to a lot of similar people, but this one seems to be better than the others", or like "wow, this is my first such experience in my life"?). Also, the "street-corner prophet" is a familiar concept, but I don't know whether it's historically accurate or an artifact of later times.
Apr
8
comment Was Jesus unique from the point of view of contemporaries?
@StevenBurnap : That "source" played at least a very little role in me asking this question, so it was nice to see your comment. However, I hope the answers will contain somewhat more serious sources.
Apr
8
revised Was Jesus unique from the point of view of contemporaries?
deleted 5 characters in body
Apr
8
asked Was Jesus unique from the point of view of contemporaries?
Apr
8
comment In XIXth century lower classes families, was it common for kids to witness their parent's intercourse?
You mentioned flats, so I assumed you were talking about people in the cities.
Apr
8
comment In XIXth century lower classes families, was it common for kids to witness their parent's intercourse?
Children those days played outside most of the time, only coming home when food was served, and for bedtime.
Apr
8
comment References or accounts in historical Egyptian literature about the Exodus
Also note, that we know very little about that period. There are a few tombs from roughly that time period, but besides that, there are no official records of events from that era. Basically, we can neither prove nor disprove it (using strictly secular resources) because there are no historical records from those times written by Egyptians to survive to the modern day.