651 reputation
49
bio website paleografie.tk
location Amsterdam, The Netherlands
age
visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen Aug 7 at 23:35

Apr
24
comment What were the origins of Etruscan Civilisation?
@T.E.D.: Language is part of culture. In any case, linguistic evidence is scarce. All we know more or less for sure is that Etruscan together with Lenmian and Rhaetic forms a very small language family, Tyrrhenian, as far as we know unrelated to any other. There are speculations about a relation with Indo-European. So this does not help us. It is of course striking that a Tyrrhenian language was spoken so close to Anatolia (on Lemnos); but still there is nothing like a consensus, alas.
Mar
10
comment When did homosexuality become unacceptable in Europe?
@Robusto: Thanks! About this absence of pleasure-seeking: I would be a bit sceptical of any works published before Dover's Greek Hompsexuality. He decided to assess all common assumptions of the past very critically; earlier works tended to reproduce common beliefs among classicists that may have been based on romantic ideas from the 19th century, where sex was still fairly taboo. A kind of wishful thinking about history. Pleasure sought in homosexual acts was unthinkable. Dover (1978) says nothing about this absence of pleasure Kitto mentions in the fifties, so...
Nov
2
comment Why did China shut itself out of the world in the 15th century?
@Martin: I'm sorry, but I really don't think "Why did China shut itself out of the world in the 14th century?" is appropriate when it organized several huge expeditions after the 14th century. I really honestly don't understand this at all.
Nov
2
comment Why did China shut itself out of the world in the 15th century?
@Martin: Both the explorations (1405–1433) of Zheng He and the great isolation happened in the 15th century, not the 14th. Why do you mention the beginning of the Ming?
Nov
2
comment Why did China shut itself out of the world in the 15th century?
You mean the 15th century.
Nov
1
comment Which country traces its roots back to the oldest civilization?
I really think Lennart's question is essential in this matter. "Civilization" is hardly an academically fixed concept.
Oct
30
comment What was Lenin's major criticism of or differences with Marx?
I believe an important difference was that Marx had an industrialized society in mind where his class struggle was expected to lead to a classless state through a revolution of the industrial proletariat, not a mainly agrarian society like Russia; but Lenin tried to incite various non-industrial segments of society to bring about a classless state in agrarian Russia.
Oct
28
comment Pedophilia in ancient Greek and Roman culture
@Lennart: I think my explicit statement that it was not about sex with prepubescent children should have been clear enough; but I suppose a short discussion of the various definitions would improve my answer, so I have added that. Is this better?
Oct
28
comment Pedophilia in ancient Greek and Roman culture
@Nol: That is true if you compare Athens with Rome; but I believe many other Greek cities had stronger taboos against it, so it would be difficult to compare the whole with Rome. Besides, I believe there were significant differences between the various cultures within the Roman Empire too.
Oct
28
comment Pedophilia in ancient Greek and Roman culture
P.S. How am I blurring the difference if I explicitly state that they did not normally have sex with prepubescent boys? That seems clear enough.
Oct
28
comment Pedophilia in ancient Greek and Roman culture
@Lennart: You are being selective. There are several definitions of "child" on your Wiki link. The Greeks didn't even have a word for the modern phenomenon (Greek paedophilia has no necessary sexual meaning), so of course they didn't think of it as modern Westerners do. If the question is "was it paedophilia to the Greeks?", then there would be no meaningful answer, because it is an anachronism. Is it unreasonable to explain Greek sex under 18 to such a question? I never said it was paedophilia; I just mentioned the ages and left it open to the reader to define it.
Oct
28
comment Pedophilia in ancient Greek and Roman culture
@Lennart: "Any sexual interest in children" does not fit with Athenian practice? How does it not? Men performed sexual acts with children.
Oct
28
comment Pedophilia in ancient Greek and Roman culture
Wikipedia has several definitions: As a medical diagnosis, pedophilia (or paedophilia) is defined as a psychiatric disorder in adults or late adolescents (persons age 16 or older) typically characterized by a primary or exclusive sexual interest in prepubescent children (generally age 13 years or younger, though onset of puberty may vary). ... In popular usage, pedophilia means any sexual interest in children or the act of child sexual abuse, often termed "pedophilic behavior.".
Oct
28
comment Pedophilia in ancient Greek and Roman culture
@Lennart: Then what is this difference you are talking about? You mention no definition, and the word "pedophilia" means different things to different people, so I have no idea what either you or the OP have in mind. I tried to circumvent this problem by clearly mentioning ages all through my answer, so that people may put their own labels on them. I'd appreciate it if you described this difference to me and how you would say it.
Oct
27
comment Pedophilia in ancient Greek and Roman culture
@Lennart: It depends on your definition of pedophilia. The question didn't provide one, but it mentioned Greece, so all information about sex with children seemed relevant.
Oct
27
comment When and how did the idea of a “class-less” society originate in the United States?
Ideas in France and America about equality influenced each other in various complex ways (I don't know the details). If I had to hazard a guess, I'd say that French enlightened culture exerted greater influence on America than vice versa, considering the extensive production of enlightened literature in France prior to the Revolutions; but it is remarkable that America went first. I believe the democracies of Europe, while no doubt also influenced by the American Revolution, mostly looked to French ideas in this respect; e.g. the Am. Rev. does not figure prominently in Dutch history books.
Oct
26
comment What were the acceptance criteria in universities of medieval Europe?
P.S. Universities in most of continental Europe are still controlled by the state and by no means private, some more directly than others. That is why tuition fees are usually between zero and about a tenth of those in America.
Oct
26
comment What were the acceptance criteria in universities of medieval Europe?
" ... These structural differences created other characteristics. At the Bologna university the students ran everything—a fact that often put teachers under great pressure and disadvantage. In Paris, teachers ran the school; thus Paris became the premiere spot for teachers from all over Europe. Also, in Paris the main subject matter was theology, so control of the qualifications awarded was in the hands of an external authority - the Chancellor of the diocese. In Bologna, where students chose more secular studies, the main subject was law." I believe the Bologna model was/became quite common.
Oct
26
comment What were the acceptance criteria in universities of medieval Europe?
From Wiki: "Universities were generally structured along three types, depending on who paid the teachers. The first type was in Bologna, where students hired and paid for the teachers. The second type was in Paris, where teachers were paid by the church. Oxford and Cambridge were predominantly supported by the crown and the state, a fact which helped them survive the Dissolution of the Monasteries in 1538 and the subsequent removal of all the principal Catholic institutions in England. ..."
Oct
26
comment How did Edward Misselden become a deputy-governor of a merchant company at 15?
P.S. This isn't really relevant, but I find that FAQ a little bit misleading, in that a person's floruit is rarely marked as a single year, but always as a period as comprehensive as possible. If one knows only that author Fiddlebum published a work in the year 174, one should not say Fuddlebum (fl. 174), but rather Fiddlebum (late 2nd century) and mention the work separately, or perhaps Fiddlebum (published De Navi in 174).