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8h
comment Did World War II-era bombs actually whistle?
hmm, I'd design it like that or similar to save some weight first...
8h
comment Did World War II-era bombs actually whistle?
they whistled as a side effect of their shape and construction, not deliberately. It may have been a desirable side effect, but it wasn't designed as such.
9h
comment High-altitude naval bombing in World War II
@IanRingrose hence the RAF resorting to area bombing of entire cities, often with incendiaries.
9h
comment Which civilization is the first to know about the existence of the Arctic circle?
the "arctic circle" is not precisely defined. People living near it would just realise that there's a place where it's too cold to grow crops in summer and probably not go there except to hunt. The equator is precisely defined of course, and once clocks and sextants were available could be mapped.
1d
comment Weapons of Mass Destruction
well, you obviously know very little of history if you're not familiar with chemical and biological weapons, both of which have been in use for millennia. Do a bit of research, and don't ask list questions here
2d
awarded  Nice Answer
2d
comment Why was the arrival of the Hindenburg considered newsworthy?
and of course only the rich and famous traveled by airship because of the cost, and there were papparazzi back then just as there are now hoping to snatch a picture of some celebrity with a new flame...
2d
comment Korean DMZ Soldiers
@NuWin they're not standing rigidly at attention, compared to the DPRKs their uniforms are less starched, make that "sloppy" in the words of a propaganda writer, Of course they're tense, but you're not going to get a picture printed large enough in the Pyong Yang Daily News to notice that :)
Aug
25
comment Korean DMZ Soldiers
notice that this photo was taken from the North Korean side, which makes me wonder whether they're trying to reap some propaganda benefits out of it. See how the DPRKs are standing firmly at attention, the ROK troopers are far more relaxed ("lack of disciplne" comes to mind) while the ROK civilians have their backs turned towards their own troops (as well as the DPRK troops of course) which if I were a DPRK propaganda officer I'd use to claim they despise their capitalist overlords.
Aug
25
comment When did the Romans begin using the sword, as opposed to the axe, for decapitation?
Another thing to mention in relation with citizenship that citizenship was sometimes revoked in order to be able to convict the person to a different punishment.
Aug
24
comment Why did Argentina invade the Falkland when they did, rather than waiting for the pending sale of the UK aircraft carriers to complete first?
@WS2 Britain certainly stood a very real chance of losing. They were at the end of the longest logistical chain ever in the history of warfare, they were outnumbered, they were outgunned, and it was not at all certain when they set out with the taskforce that they'd have international support (in fact there were strong voices in the US for sending support to Argentina, which the US were trying to retain and strengthen as an ally in Latin America. What do you think would have happened had they had a few dozen Harpoon missiles and aircraft to launch them...).
Aug
23
comment Why did Argentina invade the Falkland when they did, rather than waiting for the pending sale of the UK aircraft carriers to complete first?
@WS2 yes, and which is a far lower percentage than predicted by UK warplans which insisted on SAMs being the one and only way to fight aircraft...
Aug
23
comment Why did Argentina invade the Falkland when they did, rather than waiting for the pending sale of the UK aircraft carriers to complete first?
@WS2 yes, the surviving ones were. They were however late to arrive, and only some of them worked.
Aug
22
comment Why did email use develop in tandem with the internet, rather than other technologies?
by the late 1980s we had a fax machine at work, but yes, we were among the first in the country and it was paid for by my dad's company so his secretary could send him important documents, saving him hours driving to pick them up before his frequent trips abroad. Another data point: my dad ordered 12 fax machines installed in the mid 1980s. At that time there were 10 fax machines in the entire country, his order to our national telecoms company doubled the installed number instantly. He was planning to have on installed in his car, didn't do it because nobody knew how to fit one...
Aug
22
comment By mid-1945, was Japan capable of maintaining the war even in the absence of further direct American attacks?
@DavidRicherby Japan also was less easy to blockade, the Sea of Japan was more or less an inland sea for them right up to the end, and US submarines and surface vessels found it almost impossible to operate there. So they had effectively almost unimpeded naval and air links to the Chinese and Korean mainland, something the UK did not have.
Aug
22
comment By mid-1945, was Japan capable of maintaining the war even in the absence of further direct American attacks?
@IanRingrose they sure did. In his own words (somewhat garbled in translation no doubt) he stated in his radio address in which he ordered the population to surrender to the inevitable that "the enemy now has a weapon against which there is no defense, in such a situation defeat is no dishonour".
Aug
22
comment What benefits were there to the USA of developing both Uranium and Plutonium bombs in World War 2?
and of course to have a larger stockpile of bomb material, so more weapons could be produced in the limited time available.
Aug
22
comment Why did Argentina invade the Falkland when they did, rather than waiting for the pending sale of the UK aircraft carriers to complete first?
@SteveBird yes, they never considered that the British, after the gutting of their armed forces in the late 1970s and a long period of Labour governments, had the guts or the capability to mount a successful campaign to retake the islands. And they were nearly proven right, powerful forces in the UK government and defense department argued just that, that it would be impossible to succeed and that therefore they shouldn't even try. Thatcher went against them, stating more or less that it's better to try and fail than to never try at all.
Aug
22
comment Why did Argentina invade the Falkland when they did, rather than waiting for the pending sale of the UK aircraft carriers to complete first?
@WS2 no Mirages were in theater to be shot down by anyone. The Super Etandards were fought mostly by the Harrier force. The missiles of the fleet and ground forces saw relatively little action, certainly far less than the all-missile strategy of the UK military had predicted (which was a good thing as a lot of them were inoperable because of salt water damage, especially the Rapiers).
Aug
22
revised Why did Argentina invade the Falkland when they did, rather than waiting for the pending sale of the UK aircraft carriers to complete first?
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