345 reputation
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location United States
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visits member for 2 years, 9 months
seen Dec 24 '13 at 17:28

I want patience and I want it now.

Also, I find that nostalgia isn't what it used to be.

Laziness is what gets me out of bed in the morning.

正宗で大根を切る。

言い出しっぺ。

Some of the smartest things people have ever said:

No language makes perfect sense. — John McWhorter

Neurosis is always a substitute for legitimate suffering. — Carl Jung

A child educated only at school is an uneducated child. — George Santayana

Tactics is knowing what to do when there is something to do. Strategy is knowing what to do when there is nothing to do. — Savielly Tartakower

One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid, and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision — Bertrand Russell

Every good thing that happens in your life is a gift. — Yours Truly


Feb
20
comment Since the inception of the United States, has the term “America” ever referred to something more than simply “the United States”?
@Drux: I subscribe to The Economist and am well aware of its usage; nevertheless, the Americas and America have never really been synonyms.
Mar
15
comment Since the inception of the United States, has the term “America” ever referred to something more than simply “the United States”?
Yes, except when certain unpleasant demonstrators yell "Death to America" it is pretty clear they are not talking about Canada or Mexico.
Jan
30
comment Since the inception of the United States, has the term “America” ever referred to something more than simply “the United States”?
@duffbeer703: Did you read the second paragraph of my question? It will show you that 1) I am not asking about any current definition (hence asking this on History.SE), and 2) if Americans writing during the era I'm interested in ever thought there was a difference in meaning.
Jan
27
comment Since the inception of the United States, has the term “America” ever referred to something more than simply “the United States”?
@SteveMelnikoff: Thanks, but those don't really answer my question, which is from the historical perspective and covers a very specific meaning.
Jan
26
comment Are there examples of well known medieval battles with very little archaeological evidence?
Part of the problem is that in small countries with long histories, battlefields tend to get used for other things. While researching a book on 11th century England I went looking for the site of the Battle of Stamford Bridge, wherein Harold Godwinesson defeated the Norse invader Harald Hardrada just a couple of weeks before he himself was defeated in turn by the Norman invader William the Bastard (a.k.a. William the Conqueror). There was a small marker, but the rest of the site was being used as a cricket pitch.
Jan
26
comment Since the inception of the United States, has the term “America” ever referred to something more than simply “the United States”?
@Lohoris: I didn't ask it on ELU because it would very likely be closed as off-topic or too narrow, since it is not really a question about language per se, but about the historical use of two specific terms as they apply to a particular country.
Jan
26
comment Since the inception of the United States, has the term “America” ever referred to something more than simply “the United States”?
Thanks, but that's not really what I'm asking. I'm trying to find out whether "America" was ever taken to mean the actual states plus any of its possessions (such as territories), as distinct from just "the United States." I want to know if "America" and "the United States" were ever considered anything but identical sets of components.
Jan
25
comment Since the inception of the United States, has the term “America” ever referred to something more than simply “the United States”?
Obviously you don't see the distinction I am trying to draw.
Jan
25
comment Since the inception of the United States, has the term “America” ever referred to something more than simply “the United States”?
@fabianhjr: "North America" is a continent. "The Americas" refers to countries on the continent or both North and South America. But "America" refers to "The United States."
Jan
11
comment What are the counterarguments to calling German nazism a right-wing movement?
Why not just say they are different terms that are misapplied across different languages and cultures? Your answer sounds like the wounded cry of someone whose politics have been assaulted — "Nazism and Fascism ... share a LOT .. with a lot of liberal/progressive politics" [emphasis yours] — rather than a balanced, dispassionate explanation.
Oct
28
comment Why did the Monitor and Merrimac (aka Virginia) have such radically different designs?
I understood that the Monitor had two guns, facing opposite each other, so that one could be firing at the enemy while the other was facing away for reloading.
Oct
27
comment When did homosexuality become unacceptable in Europe?
+1: It's worth noting that the act of coitus between an older man and an ephebe has been described as ritualistic and formulaic — not the languid, gay-porn depictions some would imagine, but something in which the adolescent male was actually discouraged from seeking pleasure from. I can't remember where I read that; probably H.D.F. Kitto's book The Greeks.