131 reputation
2
bio website
location United Kingdom
age 70
visits member for 1 year
seen Nov 10 at 17:16

Retired Chartered Mgmt Accountant. Have since taken a degree and an MA in history. My MA dissertation concerned late-eighteenth century radical gentry in Norwich, sympathetic to the ideals of the French Revolution, and their clandestine journal 'The Cabinet'. I have no experience of linguistics, and my only language other than English is French, in which I am modestly competent. Norfolk Dumpling by birth and upbringing I have an enduring interest in the dialect and have written a good part of the Wikipaedia entry on that subject. Nowadays I strive to speak Received English (though not always using Received Pronunciation). I live in Berkshire.


Nov
10
comment Impact of the Berlin Wall to GDR
What I think should now be clear is that the whole panoply of Soviet defence, of which this was part, was driven by intense conditions of paranoia inside the USSR. The Nazi invasion of 1941 had left the country rigid with fear of being overrun by the western powers.
Nov
10
comment What was the ideological and philosophical underpinnings of World War II?
This is quite ridiculous. An argument can be made that the Second WW was in essence a continuation of the First; which was inter alia a war between empires. But of far greater relevance was that the Second World War was fought, on the Allied side, to deal with the pernicious Nazi and Fascist ideologies which had arisen in Europe out of German defeat and the peace treaty of 1918. Some historians have seen both wars as part of 'the course of German history' - notably A.J.P.Taylor in his book by that name. It is not a fashionable view.
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Feb
16
comment Why did American public opinion move away from isolationism in 1940-41?
My point is that the end of US isolationism tends to fit with one of the grand themes of history, namely the globalisation of the world economy, and the movement from European dominance to super-power dominance. However the movements which caused the war, namely fascism, nazism etc tend now to be viewed by recent historians as aberrations in European history. Isolationism would still, I would suggest, have ended, even had there been no Hitler nor Mussolini.
Feb
16
comment Why did American public opinion move away from isolationism in 1940-41?
My guess is that it was not so much the war as the previous economic depression that sounded the death knell for isolationism, but I don't know. What is public opinion? One view might be that history is driven by all kinds of change going on in the world and in society, and that 'public opinion' is only a sideshow.
Feb
16
comment Why did American public opinion move away from isolationism in 1940-41?
Try this: Activism Replaces Isolationism: U.S. Public Attitudes 1940-1975 [Hardcover] H. Schuyler Foster (Author)
Nov
15
awarded  Teacher
Nov
14
answered How come Indians were not mass converted to Islam/Christianity?