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Following a career in Accountancy and in my retirement I have taken both an undergraduate degree and an MA in history. My MA dissertation topic concerned late-eighteenth century radical gentry in the City of Norwich who were sympathetic to the ideals of the French Revolution, and their clandestine journal 'The Cabinet'. I have no experience of linguistics, and my only language other than English is French, in which I am modestly competent. Norfolk Dumpling by birth and upbringing I have an enduring interest in the dialect and have written a good part of the Wikipaedia entry on that subject. Nowadays I strive to speak the Queen's English. I live in Berkshire.


Feb
16
comment Why did American public opinion move away from isolationism in 1940-41?
My point is that the end of US isolationism tends to fit with one of the grand themes of history, namely the globalisation of the world economy, and the movement from European dominance to super-power dominance. However the movements which caused the war, namely fascism, nazism etc tend now to be viewed by recent historians as aberrations in European history. Isolationism would still, I would suggest, have ended, even had there been no Hitler nor Mussolini.
Feb
16
comment Why did American public opinion move away from isolationism in 1940-41?
My guess is that it was not so much the war as the previous economic depression that sounded the death knell for isolationism, but I don't know. What is public opinion? One view might be that history is driven by all kinds of change going on in the world and in society, and that 'public opinion' is only a sideshow.
Feb
16
comment Why did American public opinion move away from isolationism in 1940-41?
Try this: Activism Replaces Isolationism: U.S. Public Attitudes 1940-1975 [Hardcover] H. Schuyler Foster (Author)
Nov
15
awarded  Teacher
Nov
14
answered How come Indians were not mass converted to Islam/Christianity?