8,414 reputation
22471
bio website stackoverflow.com
location New York, NY
age 42
visits member for 2 years, 8 months
seen yesterday

StackOveflow profile

Areas of strength:

  • Perl expert (specifically enterprise software development)
  • Sybase (including design and optimization)
  • GUI design

Areas of familiarity:

  • Web programming (EmbPerl, JSP, CSS, HTML, JavaScript)
  • C++

...P.S. I'm not really 42. But 42 is way cooler than a real answer :)

...P.P.S. Don't read too much into the icon. Just a minor nod to Cryptonomicon.


Apr
21
comment Historical examples of replacing blood heir by impostor?
@andy256 - there are always witnesses to things. Who tend to leave memoirs. Or genetic research. I don't see it as even remotely impossible to discover.
Apr
20
comment Historical examples of replacing blood heir by impostor?
@PieterGeerkens: from Wikipedia: "Catherine, although not descended from any previous Russian emperor, succeeded her husband as Empress Regnant. She followed the precedent established when Catherine I (born in the lower classes in the Swedish East Baltic territories) succeeded her husband Peter the Great in 1725.==== Historians debate Catherine's technical status, seeing her as a Regent or as a usurper, tolerable only during the minority of her son, Grand Duke Paul". Note that there's no dispute that she legitimately ascended to the throne in 1762.
Apr
20
comment Historical examples of replacing blood heir by impostor?
@PieterGeerkens - Again, imposter implies pretending to be some other person. NOT holding a post under your own name, whether illegitimately or legitimately. Now, if Catherine held the post by pretending to be an offspring of Romanoffs (as opposed to a wife), that'd be an imposter; but I don't recall her doing so.
Apr
20
comment Historical examples of replacing blood heir by impostor?
@PieterGeerkens - "imposter" - "One who engages in deception under an assumed name or identity" implies that the woman who Russians called Catherine wasn't actually the wife of the Tsar. Which wasn't the case Catherine, AFAIK.
Apr
20
comment Why were Albanians the only nation in the Balkans who converted to Islam during the Ottoman occupation?
Sorry, -1. While factually correct, the answer doesn't actually address the crux of the question (what was different between Albanians (and Bosnians) as opposed to the rest of Ottoman holdings in Balcans) that led to total Islamisation.
Apr
17
comment Recognition of Palestine?
@LouisRhys - Nobody criticizing Israel ever criticized Russia for keeping troops in East Germany. And almost nobody criticizing Israel criticized China for Tibet and certainly not to the point of advocating for boycoytts of China (I can probably find a tiny principled subset that does both).
Apr
17
comment Were there historical examples of “citizen's arrest” concept in history independent of British common law?
The latter. Basically, where you escaping your civilian capturer is equated to escaping real arrest
Apr
17
comment Were there historical examples of “citizen's arrest” concept in history independent of British common law?
Arrest means you're LEGALLY arrested. As in, you don't have the right to leave if you physically can.
Apr
17
comment Were there historical examples of “citizen's arrest” concept in history independent of British common law?
Sorry, I don't think these were meant to include arrest.
Apr
17
comment Were there historical examples of “citizen's arrest” concept in history independent of British common law?
@Anixx - No. задержание != Гражданский арест
Apr
17
comment Were there historical examples of “citizen's arrest” concept in history independent of British common law?
@Anixx - "stop"!="arrest"
Apr
17
comment Were there historical examples of “citizen's arrest” concept in history independent of British common law?
@Anixx - have as in post-1993 or had before? If before - my main interest was before 1900s to prevent the likelyhood of comtamination from British law ideas - throw a proof reference in and you'll have a good answer.
Apr
17
comment Were there historical examples of “citizen's arrest” concept in history independent of British common law?
@Anixx - did regular citizens have the right to задержать someone? The only example I know of was special groups explicitly authorized to patrol by militia (meaning, they were effectively deputized and therefore NOT counting as "citizen" arrest). Russian Wikipedia explicitly notes that "Гражданский арест ... Наиболее известен в странах англосаксонского права, главным образом — в США... и Великобритании).
Apr
9
comment What factors made Austria adhere to “Diplomacy through marriage” doctrine?
@NL7 - the saying is from the monarchs... L'Etat, c'est moi.
Apr
9
comment What factors made Austria adhere to “Diplomacy through marriage” doctrine?
I'm STILL upset that Anne of Austria was actually Princess of Spain :)
Apr
9
comment What factors made Austria adhere to “Diplomacy through marriage” doctrine?
@NL7 - in a monarchy, diplomatic success == length of a family tree
Apr
9
comment What factors made Austria adhere to “Diplomacy through marriage” doctrine?
@Nl7 name one other European dynasty that lasted longer total time?
Apr
8
comment What factors made Austria adhere to “Diplomacy through marriage” doctrine?
@T.E.D. - Since the question is based on a popular saying (that I'm not even certain can be attributable, at least based on my Googling); I'm perfectly happy if a well cited answer concludes that the saying was wrong.
Apr
8
comment What factors made Austria adhere to “Diplomacy through marriage” doctrine?
Just to be clear, Austrian Hapsburgs != other Hapsburgs (I thinks some of yuor links relate more to Spanish branch)
Apr
7
comment How did Swiss neutrality affect WW2?
@RazieMah - please never do "upvote to get you started". Upvotes are for quality content, not participation. ESPECIALLY when the question is clearly bad. See this META: meta.history.stackexchange.com/questions/346/…