Reputation
3,489
Top tag
Next privilege 3,500 Rep.
Protect questions
Badges
13 31
Impact
~67k people reached

4h
comment Why were Greek philosophy and sciences taken up by medieval Muslim civilizations, but not contemporary Western Europe?
It's fascinating how hard is to grasp the early Christian climate. On one hand, for hundreds of years no book tried to challenge or correct Aristotle, Ptolemy, Galen. On the other hand people were ready to riot over one letter in Credo (and they did - google homoousious). Muslims acted predictably, we didn't.
5h
comment Has being a single mother been always stigmatized?
Too broad. Please edit the question and add what century and what social class is of interest. Otherwise it would require a whole book. But the question is interesting.
Feb
4
comment What motivated revolutionary France to declare war on Britain in 1793?
I mean I would prefer clear language over euphemisms. web.archive.org/web/20080530044652/http://www.calvinvanhoek.com/…
Feb
3
comment Is the name of Askandra Village, Rajasthan related to Alexander the Great?
Alexander's achievements are on par with Stalin's. Whatever the reasons the bloodthirsty Hellene is still so popular, I think any city named after him should be rather ashamed of itself (as Stalingrad once was).
Feb
3
comment What motivated revolutionary France to declare war on Britain in 1793?
I think we can afford not to repeat the mumblings of politicians. The war wasn't "brewing", you provide evidence that is was planned by British government. Ordinary people couldn't really do anything to escalate the international conflict, did they?
Jan
28
comment Did the passage from Latin to English, in England, help science flourish?
Your question seems off. As I read your comments, I think what you want to know is actually if switching to native language helped education, not science. For elementary education the answer is historically obvious; not so for scientific method which really happens at universities and later.
Jan
22
comment Was Caligula popular with the general Roman population?
Welcome to the site :)
Dec
30
comment Did the poor performance of the Red Army in the Winter War significantly contribute to German underestimation of the USSR's military capacity?
@FelixGoldberg If you have read Solonin you surely remember how he quotes along an absurdly high failure ratio of T-34&KV tanks also an absurdly high failure ratio of any equipment including plain rifles and... mortars (65% of the latter if I'm not mistaken). Solonin points out any equipment related statistics are irrelevant when the evidence is clear that Soviet troops and lower/mid hierarchy were rarely attempting and willing to effectively fight in 1942. Midst forged reports and false self-justifications, the statistics are likely also forged.
Nov
19
comment As American as the Apple Pie?
Popcorn would be more adequate, looking at its history and pre-history.
Nov
19
comment Were life imprisonment and mental insanity the only reasons a divorce couldn't be granted in early 20th century England?
Based on the bold bullet, it appears that in 1937 insanity wasn't grounds for divorce, and in 1938 it became one (with emphasis on insanity "at the time of marriage").
Nov
5
comment Are the Egyptians homogeneous?
Notably, their name for the country is Misr not any phonetical variation of Egypt in the local language (Arabic). It says something, doesn't it?
Oct
26
comment Why didn't the Greeks or Romans have an Industrial Revolution?
"There needs to be a large class of people who must purchase the consumer goods". Must? The industrial revolution was driven mainly by consumers of one and only one market: textile. Everything else, steam engines, steel, railroads, whatnot, developed to support textile factories directly or indirectly. So I'd say that a fundamental precondition is to have a large population able to PAY for the textiles. Not the noble 5%, but much much more people buying more and more clothes, a market nearly impossible to saturate. Then you save money by mechanizing production - and you have the Revolution.
Sep
22
comment What was the price of basic foodstuff in 1930 Poland?
-1 Doesn't answer the question.
Sep
18
comment Were the “hussars” that Jan Sobieski used at the battle of Vienna actually elite troops?
The hussars were already explained in this answer history.stackexchange.com/questions/4368/…
Sep
18
comment Statistics on pre-revolutionary Russian education
Please stay and answer some more questions around here :)
Sep
18
comment When did waving become a part of human interaction?
Surprisingly, waving is a very primitive gesture. With children, this is often the very first visible sign of conscious communication. Child sees you waving and knows it should wave back. It happens long before any other gestures; before they can walk or speak. It happens even when child didn't observe other people waving at another, so it's not a learned skill.
Aug
15
comment Ancient Christianity
I dont' know of any historical fact between 30 and 64 C.E. to warrant such numerical projection. Otherwise, your answer is more than correct.
Aug
15
comment Ancient Christianity
++1 although I find the "slow growth" not aligned with a known fact. A minor sect of a minor religion appeared in a very backward province; and about 35 years later the number of believers living in the distant capital, and the recognition by public over there, was enough to blame them of setting fire to the city. They were no nomads, they had no printing, no Internet. Just a plain face-to-face communication of actual sedentary people. The initial spread was amazing, and - to me - yet unexplained.
Mar
2
comment Is there a student of Arnold J Toynbee with an opinion about the state and fate of Western Civilization?
This may be of interest to you: thearchdruidreport.blogspot.com/2014/07/…
Feb
11
comment Why did the USSR preserve the national republics?
@FelixGoldberg My point was that even for such a hurried action (in the wake of Hiroshima), when there was no time for careful staging, Soviet Union didn't just hold the conquered land (which it could surely do). I argue that Soviet leadership eventually still felt obliged to give the land to some national government (of course as long as it was a socialist/communist government).