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seen Nov 22 at 10:26

Nov
27
comment How did Greece avoid the Soviet sphere of influence?
Hence I've made a comment, not an answer.
Nov
27
comment How did Greece avoid the Soviet sphere of influence?
For Yugoslavia and Albania, as much as it is questionable if they were a part of Eastern Bloc (after, respectively, 1948 and 1961), they surely weren't under USSR command like the rest. Nice overview of Soviet political progress: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eastern_Bloc
Nov
25
comment How many people were affected by the Golodomor [Famine-Genocide in Ukraine]
OP asked about two things: the numbers and the sources. What question was on your mind when answering?
Nov
24
comment How was Israel able to build a powerful military within days of the formation of the state?
"The Battle" of Tel Hai in 1920 is a peculiar choice of wording: 8 killed vs 5 killed... Thus decisive Arab victory! No kidding, everything is in Wikipedia.
Nov
24
comment What was the societal wealth demographics when the major pyramids were built?
Having great capital leads to having greater capital (hence "capitalism"). But even 500 years ago the positive feedback loop of capital was of no importance whatsoever. It was important to have much land, vasals, and army. If you had money, great, but it didn't led you to have even more money; you had the money so you spent it and had less.
Nov
23
comment What was the worst economic crisis of all times?
+1 Great chart.
Nov
22
comment Did the communication lag become a problem for the ever expanding Roman Empire?
The cursus publicus was a direct predecessor of all modern Western mail, so it feels strange to describe it as "something analogous to US pony express". en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mail
Nov
22
comment What is so special about the location of Mexico City?
May be of some use: books.google.com/books?id=J_wzOoGtYQoC&pg=PA110
Nov
20
comment How many people were affected by the Golodomor [Famine-Genocide in Ukraine]
@DVK In 6 popular transliteration standards (including Ukrainian's national), the "cold" is "kholod" or "cholod". Quite unlike usual Russian transliterations. There is only one standard (ISO 9) in which Ukrainian "cold" is "holod".
Nov
20
comment Credibility of “Mao: The Unknown Story”
As much as I do like to read biased books (who doesn't), I only try to mention/cite/recall them where the neutrality is not very important; mostly in small talk. In general, it doesn't matter if a book is properly (or even magnificently) sourced: it is not a reliable source if it is biased. I treat such books as fun reads, collections of dubious anecdotes, and bibliographies of candidates for primary sources (candidates that need re-verification). Inherently, the less a book is scientific, the more it is entertaining. Secondary source is really dull if it's properly written.
Nov
20
comment No speed limit on German highways - why?
This answer is as good when I substitute "French" for "German".
Nov
19
comment When people use spears to fight cavalry do infantry stab the horse or the rider?
@Jim Thio Generally the whole point of cavalry is exploiting the fact that "it's so difficult for an infantry to move around" (on both the tactical scale and the operational scale). Otherwise you'd be better off with only infantry - they cost less and eat less.
Nov
16
comment Evolution of United States' world role?
Any sources for how "export of F-T" could increase US power alone? I fail to see this. Wasn't it just a matter of capital ownership (the "neo-colonialism"), followed optionally by the export of F-T?
Nov
14
comment What factors contributed to the U.S economy flourishing during the early cold war period?
The production is high, the consumption is high (as this includes army consumption). What is not really relevant for the "economy" is the well-being of civilians.
Nov
14
comment When did the Roman forum fall into disuse?
Byzantines still maintained the Forum, at least until 608, when they built their last monument there (Phokas column).
Nov
14
comment About the reasons for the US involvement in WW2 in Europe
Updated, count of US Army divisions in active combat
Nov
14
comment About the reasons for the US involvement in WW2 in Europe
If, as you say, US aimed to maintain German/Soviet balance in Europe, as of June 1944 they would have switch Lend-Lease to help Germans against Soviet Union, instead of invading Normandy. The invasion on Normandy, so late in the war, indicates that they were very much interested in fighting Germans; so "just conquer" and not "divide and conquer".
Nov
13
comment When did the Roman forum fall into disuse?
Nah. I've seen an estimate 75,000 for 8th century and down to a historical minimum of 25,000-35,000 in 1084 after sacking by Normans.
Nov
13
comment About the reasons for the US involvement in WW2 in Europe
What is the source for existence of US consideration of point 2 ("Russian victory")? At what time they considered it?
Nov
11
comment Did the Founding Fathers of the USA really make a distinction between a Republic and a Democracy (and despised the latter)?
Using "loaded" terms like democracy or republic usually leads all discussion into futile attempts to agree on definitions. Personally, I find it obvious that Founding Fathers wanted "rule of law" more than "rule of majority" (otherwise, why would they even need a constitution?!?) But this observation does not lead me to BLAME SOME WORDS. It is simple to pick up a word, "democracy", which is known to have many definitions, pick up only one definition, and try to make the whole word LOOK BAD. Are you interested in a history of a word, or a history of some precise concept? What concept?