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Nov
8
comment What factors contributed to the rise of national monarchies in the high middle ages?
Umm national? Could you use a less "loaded" term, one that can be clearly defined? Do you mean these states were: single-language, single-culture, common ancestry, common economy, geographically large, or some combination of these?
Oct
30
comment When were the different stories of Hindu gods written?
You do understand that we deal with history here? History is a science that attempts to determine a one, single, coherent chain of events. It uses many old texts, without presuming any priority among them; they are equal in the beginning. Next, texts that don't stick to a version supported by the majority, we dump them into a large bag called "ahistoric", so they wouldn't bother us anymore. This is the nature of this science. You can use the texts for quite different purposes, but these are not called "history"; they are simply something else.
Oct
30
comment Has the accounting services industry ever been disrupted in the U.S.?
@David To "disrupt the market" means to (temporarily) stop all the service buying/selling activity; for example if you'd convert accounting from a business-to-business service to a state-sponsored, government-regulated program. Instead, do you want to ask about business-to-business services which were revolutionized in the course of history, and in which marketing efforts played the main part? (Note they could have been revolutionized because of external causes, without any marketing)
Oct
23
comment Why were there “hussars” all across Europe?
I've meant that if you, as an armchair general, used one instead of the other as a light cavalry, it would probably made no substantial difference (taking into account that there were many different meanings of uhlan, cossack, hussar, other units in different times and in different armies); roughly. I don't imply they were identical or fought identically.
Oct
23
comment Why were there “hussars” all across Europe?
@Fitri, please qualify: when and which army?
Oct
22
comment Why were there “hussars” all across Europe?
@Russel Battle of Somosierra is a curiosity, known precisely for the unreasonable use of cavalry.
Oct
22
comment The value of spice trade during the age of exploration
+1 really cool source
Oct
19
comment Why China was able to unify and not Europe
I happily provide more "misinformation" for you to ignore. This covers October-November 1918 when thousands of people (undoubtedly incited by British and French, no?) in a matter of days or weeks disarmed German units and formed their independent states: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Polish_Republic#The_beginnings, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Origins_of_Czechoslovakia. Here is what the local people decided: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Upper_Silesia_plebiscite
Oct
19
comment Why China was able to unify and not Europe
I disagree. If Rome "attacked the strongest of the Germanic tribes" then it was "conquer" and not "Divide and Conquer". Should lead straight to unification, not to division. Why Chinese fractions didn't try to divide China? And most importantly please do check your facts: Medieval Europe under British hegemony!?! Germany rising in 1880!?! Czechoslovakia and Poland created out of thin air in 1919!?!
Oct
19
comment What is the purpose of the bridge to the Russkiy island?
Year 2008 seems more in scope of Skeptics than History.
Oct
18
comment Why China was able to unify and not Europe
Europe culture was as unifying as Chinese. What you have today is directly built on Roman roots, and ultimately, Greek. It is not at all based on "three main cultural" groups; it is based on one. Both Chinese and European elites could understand their lingua franca at all times (common people seem unrelated to the matter). So, again, why is Europe divided into states for such a long time already, and China is not?
Oct
16
comment What was the motivation for the Gregorian Calendar?
Leap second is related to the subject: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leap_second
Oct
16
comment Where does the name of the country “Belarus” come from?
-1 this does not answer the question about Belarus, only about Bela- and -rus. There is a book (in Belorussian) over the Internet that cites not less than a dozen different scientific theories of the origin of the name, compares the arguments behind each, concluding that neither can be singled out as more probable.
Oct
3
comment What role did the space race play in reducing the nuclear threat during the 1960s?
I see some sources re. US prospects on Wikipedia en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colonization_of_the_Moon, but no sources for Soviet prospects.
Oct
3
comment Was “Blitzkrieg” at least partly intended for trapping the Jews?
"somebody had to starve" - this is oversimplification. I would say "somebody had to be repressed"; this had nothing to do with food, and everything to do with totalitarianism.
Oct
1
comment Why didn't Imperial Japan attack the Soviet Union during World War 2?
I think they would rather go for Kolyma River and these gold mines, if anything. But as you say a big place with not so many resources close to Japan. Anyone can check on the map where were Norilsk nickel mines, or where was Chelyabinsk with all the tank factories. Long long way from home.
Sep
29
comment Was “Blitzkrieg” at least partly intended for trapping the Jews?
I was meant to say "in June 1941, they didn't know...". True, that mass shootings followed closely, but the first extermination camp (Auschwitz II - Birkenau) was established in October. This was the moment when Germans turned genocide into "industry".
Sep
27
comment When did aircraft carriers eclipse battleships as the “King of the seas”?
+1 although answer would benefit from more references.
Sep
25
comment How would one have gone about setting up a business during Communist Revolutionary China?
heiring?... hiring?
Sep
12
comment Did the end of the British Raj in India create an economic loss for Britain?
The bigger country (in terms of production, market, and population) the more it can push others around and profit from it. So letting control of India was a great long-term economical blow. An extreme example - dismantling United States into single states. It might not have any immediate effect on unemployment in Wisconsin (or other local metrics). But today Wisconsin implicitly benefits of the equilibrium that power of US enforced on other countries, and they would quickly lose these benefits.