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seen Mar 1 at 19:42

I am primarily a Firefox add-on developer these days. My main areas of expertise is everything Mozilla-related (XUL, JavaScript, XULRunner etc.), web technologies (HTML5, CSS etc.), web application security, Perl, Python. Some C++, Java and PHP is also doable but I am by no means an expert here.


Mar
19
comment World War II - Have Historians Envisioned How The Axis Powers Might Have Won?
@quant_dev: This is all extremely hypothetical, as I said. But you are overstating the significance of nuclear weapons - while they did have a demoralizing effect, they didn't change the course of the war. There were just too few of them, the mass-production didn't start until several years after the war.
Mar
19
revised World War II - Have Historians Envisioned How The Axis Powers Might Have Won?
added 62 characters in body
Mar
19
comment World War II - Have Historians Envisioned How The Axis Powers Might Have Won?
"Germans were not able (didn't think about it?) to organize a reliable supply of spare parts" - don't forget about the length supply lines. Germans were fighting more than 1000 km away from their factories. Supply issues were inevitable.
Mar
19
revised World War II - Have Historians Envisioned How The Axis Powers Might Have Won?
Added note on stability of the Soviet Union
Mar
19
answered World War II - Have Historians Envisioned How The Axis Powers Might Have Won?
Mar
19
comment Was Russo-Polish of 1919-1920 a war of independence?
As to Messianism, in 1919 most countries still believed that the Soviet regime was unstable and temporary. But I couldn't find any evidence that this was a real reason for the war, the internal instability of Russia seems to have been the important point. So my suspicion would be that "we fought against Communism" is an explanation of the war that came up later, long after the war - which is why I didn't mention it in my answer.
Mar
19
comment Was Russo-Polish of 1919-1920 a war of independence?
I believe that Piłsudzki didn't make a secret out of his plans. For example, Wikipedia quotes him with the words: "Closed within the boundaries of the 16th century, cut off from the Black Sea and Baltic Sea, deprived of land and mineral wealth of the South and Southeast, Russia could easily move into the status of second-grade power. Poland as the largest and strongest of new states, could easily establish a sphere of influence stretching from Finland to the Caucasus."
Mar
18
comment Why does German money from the 1940s not bear Nazi symbols?
@quant_dev: That's not really surprising - they were the national-socialist party after all.
Mar
16
comment Was Russo-Polish of 1919-1920 a war of independence?
@quant_dev: It was an "enemy of my enemy" thing. The Poles and Ukrainians already fought each other in the Polish-Ukrainian War. But both hated the Soviets enough to unite. Their ideas of what to do after they won were quite different - Petliura wanted an independent Ukraine whereas Piłsudski dreamed to revive the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth (with Ukraine as part of it).
Mar
16
answered Was Russo-Polish of 1919-1920 a war of independence?
Mar
15
comment Why does German money from the 1940s not bear Nazi symbols?
Yes, I should have checked - I remembered that incorrectly. Then I don't really understand why they printed Hindenburg on the coins, even after his death - that is unusual, coins traditionally show the current head of state if any. On the other hand, it is quite common to have famous dead people on banknotes (George Washington on US $1, Carl Friedrich Gauß on 10 DM). This banknote however presents Germans as a nation of hard workers instead. I couldn't find the process of thought that went into it anywhere.
Mar
14
reviewed Approve suggested edit on How did the bureaucratic culture of Great Britain affect its response to the protests over the Stamp Act of 1765?
Mar
14
comment Why does German money from the 1940s not bear Nazi symbols?
Btw, it is easily explained why you don't see Hitler on Nazi money: the head of state was still the president, not the chancellor. Hitler merely decided to leave the post of the president vacant after Hindenburg's death. Nevertheless, Nazi coins show Paul von Hindenburg, not Hitler. But that doesn't explain the lack of swastikas of course.
Mar
14
comment Why does German money from the 1940s not bear Nazi symbols?
@Lohoris: That would be pointless - it is an Occupation Reichsmark, those were printed specifically for occupied territories and never circulated within Germany. They are entirely different from the "regular" Reichsmark.
Mar
5
revised Jurisdiction on german occupied territories after WW II
edited body
Mar
5
answered Jurisdiction on german occupied territories after WW II
Mar
2
comment Has a book ever caused the ousting of a dictator?
@Sardathrion: As I said, books can introduce new ideas - but attacking a single person is doomed to be a failure.
Mar
2
comment Has a book ever caused the ousting of a dictator?
I'm pretty certain that the answer is "no" - books don't have that kind of power. They don't have the reach (even bestsellers are only read by a small percentage of the population) and they don't have the reputation of being objective (unlike newspapers). The real danger of books is that they can introduce new ideas in the population which is why dictators often ban certain books (as happened in Nazi Germany and USSR).
Mar
1
revised Is there evidence that working for the Pony Express was dangerous, or not dangerous?
deleted 3 characters in body
Mar
1
answered Is there evidence that working for the Pony Express was dangerous, or not dangerous?