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Apr
18
comment Did Joseph Stalin kill anyone personally?
I doubt that Stalin actually killed anybody himself in Tsaritsin, he already had a leadership position by then. Even if you look at the Tiflis bank robbery, it seems that Stalin merely supervised the operation and wasn't involved personally. Still, it is likely that somewhere during his early career he had to kill somebody with his own hands (e.g. when he escaped his Siberian exile).
Apr
5
reviewed Approve Did JFK win the presidential election by fraud?
Mar
23
comment Why didn't Moldova unite with Romania?
@Anixx: I don't think that the part about languages is true. Moldova had a large population of Russian-speakers with close to no knowledge of Romanian - now almost all of them are gone (with the exception of Transnistria) so the Russian language doesn't really play a role. Also, I don't think that English is significantly more widespread in Romania than in Moldova - it is definitely not required for the EU and good English knowledge is IMHO equally rare in both Romania and Moldova.
Mar
23
revised Why didn't Moldova unite with Romania?
Restored the parts of MichaelF's edit that made sense
Mar
21
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
21
awarded  Disciplined
Mar
21
comment Was Russo-Polish of 1919-1920 a war of independence?
@mzuba: If you look at the wars led by the Soviet Union - there isn't, not really.
Mar
20
comment Was Russo-Polish of 1919-1920 a war of independence?
@mzuba: And they would support these communist movements exclusively by peaceful means, right? Neither the rhetoric nor the actions of Lenin's government left any doubts that it would be an armed conflict.
Mar
20
comment World War II - Have Historians Envisioned How The Axis Powers Might Have Won?
@ErikSchmidt: I don't think that I am assuming anything. Yes, at the end of the war the atomic bombs played their role. But I have doubts that they would achieve the same effect against an enemy that isn't weakened (e.g. Britain in 1939). You should also consider the fact that efficient delivery systems didn't exist - so air superiority was essential to deliver the bombs. Altogether, my point is simply that there isn't a single weapon that would allow to "magically" win the war.
Mar
20
comment World War II - Have Historians Envisioned How The Axis Powers Might Have Won?
The distance that the Japanese troops would have to travel in this scenario isn't exactly small either. Occupying India in one summer? That's about as realistic as occupying the Soviet Union in one summer. And why do you think that the Soviet Union would stand by and watch Germany occupy Iran?
Mar
20
comment World War II - Have Historians Envisioned How The Axis Powers Might Have Won?
Theoretically - yes, Germany could have stopped. But if you look at the development of the German national debt in the years leading up to the war, you have to wonder whether they had any other chance but to continue. Also, a peace treaty with France was simply unrealistic - and Hitler's followers would have never accepted it, taking revenge on France was one of the main ideas of the German Nazi movement.
Mar
20
comment World War II - Have Historians Envisioned How The Axis Powers Might Have Won?
Your assumptions seem to be all wrong. 1. Nobody could develop nuclear weapons in 1939, it took years of research and even then the numbers were only sufficient to demoralize the enemy, not to defeat him. Germans tried demoralizing with V2, didn't work. 2./3. The Germans realized that they didn't have any chance to defeat Britain - that's why the invasion of Soviet Union was necessary in the first place. 4. Even if ME262 could be created sooner (which is doubtful), it was far too expensive and not meant for mass-production - producing significant counts to change something was impossible.
Mar
19
comment World War II - Have Historians Envisioned How The Axis Powers Might Have Won?
@quant_dev: Americans wouldn't be able to achieve much without using Britain as a platform for the invasion. All the supply lines went to Britain, not USA.
Mar
19
comment World War II - Have Historians Envisioned How The Axis Powers Might Have Won?
@quant_dev: This is all extremely hypothetical, as I said. But you are overstating the significance of nuclear weapons - while they did have a demoralizing effect, they didn't change the course of the war. There were just too few of them, the mass-production didn't start until several years after the war.
Mar
19
revised World War II - Have Historians Envisioned How The Axis Powers Might Have Won?
added 62 characters in body
Mar
19
comment World War II - Have Historians Envisioned How The Axis Powers Might Have Won?
"Germans were not able (didn't think about it?) to organize a reliable supply of spare parts" - don't forget about the length supply lines. Germans were fighting more than 1000 km away from their factories. Supply issues were inevitable.
Mar
19
revised World War II - Have Historians Envisioned How The Axis Powers Might Have Won?
Added note on stability of the Soviet Union
Mar
19
answered World War II - Have Historians Envisioned How The Axis Powers Might Have Won?
Mar
19
comment Was Russo-Polish of 1919-1920 a war of independence?
As to Messianism, in 1919 most countries still believed that the Soviet regime was unstable and temporary. But I couldn't find any evidence that this was a real reason for the war, the internal instability of Russia seems to have been the important point. So my suspicion would be that "we fought against Communism" is an explanation of the war that came up later, long after the war - which is why I didn't mention it in my answer.
Mar
19
comment Was Russo-Polish of 1919-1920 a war of independence?
I believe that Piłsudzki didn't make a secret out of his plans. For example, Wikipedia quotes him with the words: "Closed within the boundaries of the 16th century, cut off from the Black Sea and Baltic Sea, deprived of land and mineral wealth of the South and Southeast, Russia could easily move into the status of second-grade power. Poland as the largest and strongest of new states, could easily establish a sphere of influence stretching from Finland to the Caucasus."