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I am primarily a Firefox add-on developer these days. My main areas of expertise is everything Mozilla-related (XUL, JavaScript, XULRunner etc.), web technologies (HTML5, CSS etc.), web application security, Perl, Python. Some C++, Java and PHP is also doable but I am by no means an expert here.


Mar
21
awarded  Disciplined
Mar
21
comment Was Russo-Polish of 1919-1920 a war of independence?
@mzuba: If you look at the wars led by the Soviet Union - there isn't, not really.
Mar
20
comment Was Russo-Polish of 1919-1920 a war of independence?
@mzuba: And they would support these communist movements exclusively by peaceful means, right? Neither the rhetoric nor the actions of Lenin's government left any doubts that it would be an armed conflict.
Mar
20
comment World War II - Have Historians Envisioned How The Axis Powers Might Have Won?
@ErikSchmidt: I don't think that I am assuming anything. Yes, at the end of the war the atomic bombs played their role. But I have doubts that they would achieve the same effect against an enemy that isn't weakened (e.g. Britain in 1939). You should also consider the fact that efficient delivery systems didn't exist - so air superiority was essential to deliver the bombs. Altogether, my point is simply that there isn't a single weapon that would allow to "magically" win the war.
Mar
20
comment World War II - Have Historians Envisioned How The Axis Powers Might Have Won?
The distance that the Japanese troops would have to travel in this scenario isn't exactly small either. Occupying India in one summer? That's about as realistic as occupying the Soviet Union in one summer. And why do you think that the Soviet Union would stand by and watch Germany occupy Iran?
Mar
20
comment World War II - Have Historians Envisioned How The Axis Powers Might Have Won?
Theoretically - yes, Germany could have stopped. But if you look at the development of the German national debt in the years leading up to the war, you have to wonder whether they had any other chance but to continue. Also, a peace treaty with France was simply unrealistic - and Hitler's followers would have never accepted it, taking revenge on France was one of the main ideas of the German Nazi movement.
Mar
20
comment World War II - Have Historians Envisioned How The Axis Powers Might Have Won?
Your assumptions seem to be all wrong. 1. Nobody could develop nuclear weapons in 1939, it took years of research and even then the numbers were only sufficient to demoralize the enemy, not to defeat him. Germans tried demoralizing with V2, didn't work. 2./3. The Germans realized that they didn't have any chance to defeat Britain - that's why the invasion of Soviet Union was necessary in the first place. 4. Even if ME262 could be created sooner (which is doubtful), it was far too expensive and not meant for mass-production - producing significant counts to change something was impossible.
Mar
19
comment World War II - Have Historians Envisioned How The Axis Powers Might Have Won?
@quant_dev: Americans wouldn't be able to achieve much without using Britain as a platform for the invasion. All the supply lines went to Britain, not USA.
Mar
19
comment World War II - Have Historians Envisioned How The Axis Powers Might Have Won?
@quant_dev: This is all extremely hypothetical, as I said. But you are overstating the significance of nuclear weapons - while they did have a demoralizing effect, they didn't change the course of the war. There were just too few of them, the mass-production didn't start until several years after the war.
Mar
19
revised World War II - Have Historians Envisioned How The Axis Powers Might Have Won?
added 62 characters in body
Mar
19
comment World War II - Have Historians Envisioned How The Axis Powers Might Have Won?
"Germans were not able (didn't think about it?) to organize a reliable supply of spare parts" - don't forget about the length supply lines. Germans were fighting more than 1000 km away from their factories. Supply issues were inevitable.
Mar
19
revised World War II - Have Historians Envisioned How The Axis Powers Might Have Won?
Added note on stability of the Soviet Union
Mar
19
answered World War II - Have Historians Envisioned How The Axis Powers Might Have Won?
Mar
19
comment Was Russo-Polish of 1919-1920 a war of independence?
As to Messianism, in 1919 most countries still believed that the Soviet regime was unstable and temporary. But I couldn't find any evidence that this was a real reason for the war, the internal instability of Russia seems to have been the important point. So my suspicion would be that "we fought against Communism" is an explanation of the war that came up later, long after the war - which is why I didn't mention it in my answer.
Mar
19
comment Was Russo-Polish of 1919-1920 a war of independence?
I believe that Piłsudzki didn't make a secret out of his plans. For example, Wikipedia quotes him with the words: "Closed within the boundaries of the 16th century, cut off from the Black Sea and Baltic Sea, deprived of land and mineral wealth of the South and Southeast, Russia could easily move into the status of second-grade power. Poland as the largest and strongest of new states, could easily establish a sphere of influence stretching from Finland to the Caucasus."
Mar
18
comment Why does German money from the 1940s not bear Nazi symbols?
@quant_dev: That's not really surprising - they were the national-socialist party after all.
Mar
16
comment Was Russo-Polish of 1919-1920 a war of independence?
@quant_dev: It was an "enemy of my enemy" thing. The Poles and Ukrainians already fought each other in the Polish-Ukrainian War. But both hated the Soviets enough to unite. Their ideas of what to do after they won were quite different - Petliura wanted an independent Ukraine whereas Piłsudski dreamed to revive the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth (with Ukraine as part of it).
Mar
16
answered Was Russo-Polish of 1919-1920 a war of independence?
Mar
15
comment Why does German money from the 1940s not bear Nazi symbols?
Yes, I should have checked - I remembered that incorrectly. Then I don't really understand why they printed Hindenburg on the coins, even after his death - that is unusual, coins traditionally show the current head of state if any. On the other hand, it is quite common to have famous dead people on banknotes (George Washington on US $1, Carl Friedrich Gauß on 10 DM). This banknote however presents Germans as a nation of hard workers instead. I couldn't find the process of thought that went into it anywhere.
Mar
14
reviewed Approve How did the bureaucratic culture of Great Britain affect its response to the protests over the Stamp Act of 1765?