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Mar
18
comment Why does German money from the 1940s not bear Nazi symbols?
@quant_dev: That's not really surprising - they were the national-socialist party after all.
Mar
16
comment Was Russo-Polish of 1919-1920 a war of independence?
@quant_dev: It was an "enemy of my enemy" thing. The Poles and Ukrainians already fought each other in the Polish-Ukrainian War. But both hated the Soviets enough to unite. Their ideas of what to do after they won were quite different - Petliura wanted an independent Ukraine whereas Piłsudski dreamed to revive the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth (with Ukraine as part of it).
Mar
16
answered Was Russo-Polish of 1919-1920 a war of independence?
Mar
15
comment Why does German money from the 1940s not bear Nazi symbols?
Yes, I should have checked - I remembered that incorrectly. Then I don't really understand why they printed Hindenburg on the coins, even after his death - that is unusual, coins traditionally show the current head of state if any. On the other hand, it is quite common to have famous dead people on banknotes (George Washington on US $1, Carl Friedrich Gauß on 10 DM). This banknote however presents Germans as a nation of hard workers instead. I couldn't find the process of thought that went into it anywhere.
Mar
14
reviewed Approve How did the bureaucratic culture of Great Britain affect its response to the protests over the Stamp Act of 1765?
Mar
14
comment Why does German money from the 1940s not bear Nazi symbols?
Btw, it is easily explained why you don't see Hitler on Nazi money: the head of state was still the president, not the chancellor. Hitler merely decided to leave the post of the president vacant after Hindenburg's death. Nevertheless, Nazi coins show Paul von Hindenburg, not Hitler. But that doesn't explain the lack of swastikas of course.
Mar
14
comment Why does German money from the 1940s not bear Nazi symbols?
@Lohoris: That would be pointless - it is an Occupation Reichsmark, those were printed specifically for occupied territories and never circulated within Germany. They are entirely different from the "regular" Reichsmark.
Mar
5
revised Jurisdiction on german occupied territories after WW II
edited body
Mar
5
answered Jurisdiction on german occupied territories after WW II
Mar
2
comment Has a book ever caused the ousting of a dictator?
@Sardathrion: As I said, books can introduce new ideas - but attacking a single person is doomed to be a failure.
Mar
2
comment Has a book ever caused the ousting of a dictator?
I'm pretty certain that the answer is "no" - books don't have that kind of power. They don't have the reach (even bestsellers are only read by a small percentage of the population) and they don't have the reputation of being objective (unlike newspapers). The real danger of books is that they can introduce new ideas in the population which is why dictators often ban certain books (as happened in Nazi Germany and USSR).
Mar
1
revised Is there evidence that working for the Pony Express was dangerous, or not dangerous?
deleted 3 characters in body
Mar
1
answered Is there evidence that working for the Pony Express was dangerous, or not dangerous?
Feb
29
awarded  Enlightened
Feb
29
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
29
comment Plans for More Nuclear Warfare in Japan during WW2
@harper89: See answer by Legion600, he explains where this figure comes from. But the document he found also makes clear that these weren't real plans.
Feb
29
comment Plans for More Nuclear Warfare in Japan during WW2
Nice find! Just a note: General John E. Hull was involved in planning Operation Downfall, the document seems to refer to that. Still, the content and the date make it clear that there was no plan to support Operation Downfall with nuclear weapons - this is pure improvisation, not something that has been planned in a advance.
Feb
28
answered Plans for More Nuclear Warfare in Japan during WW2
Feb
28
reviewed Approve
Feb
28
reviewed Approve