313 reputation
17
bio website google.com/…
location Berlin, Germany
age
visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen Jul 13 at 13:39

I'm the Grumpy Old Ape sometimes answering C++ questions on Stackoverflow.
Usually you will find me in the C++ Lounge of the Stack Overflow chat.

I occasionally retweet something on my Twitter account, and I'm known to even generate my own tweets once in a while.


Oct
20
comment Is there evidence that communists did supply drugs to West Berlin?
This answer seems quite reasonable, +1. Also note that, if East Germany would have supplied the drugs, they would have to be bought using hard currency, which was in short supply in East Germany.
Oct
20
comment Is there evidence that communists did supply drugs to West Berlin?
The airport is named "Schönefeld", alternative spelling: "Schoenefeld". (I can't fix that myself due to it being to few characters I'd change.)
Oct
20
comment How high the death rate on the Berlin Wall compared to other borders?
What might make the comparatively low number so prominent might be 1) the border was dividing a country, a city, into two countries/cities, splitting right through families, friends, neighbors; 2) people weren't trying to get into somewhere, they were trying to get out; 3) the border cut right through one of the worlds industrial and cultural centers.
Oct
20
comment How high the death rate on the Berlin Wall compared to other borders?
Are you asking about the Berlin Wall or about the whole German-German border?
Oct
20
comment How high the death rate on the Berlin Wall compared to other borders?
Most of those serving at the border weren't paid for it at all, but were drafted for military service, and were just unlucky to end up "protecting" the border. There were indeed soldiers killed by comrades who wanted to flee.
Aug
25
comment Did Native Americans ever fight the indigenous people living in Mexico before Europeans arrived?
What is the difference between "native Americans" and "indigenous people" in America?
Aug
23
comment isn't islam reason the undevelopment in the middle east?
If it weren't for Islamic scientists, the Western world would have lost most of its classic cultural inheritance. It was Islamic scholars who kept copying those classic scrolls, and if it wasn't for them, we'd know a lot less about Greek and Roman times. So, even if your axiom was true (which is debated for good reason), it obviously is not the religion which would be to blame for it.
Jul
5
comment What are the factors that caused the new world civilizations to be less technologically advanced than the old world?
Except for Australia and the Americas, all major landmasses occupied by humans had contact with each other and could communicate ideas. Discoveries made in the old world had a good chance of spreading throughout three continents. The civilizations of the old world could be far enough from each other to not to be direct rivals, yet they could cross-fertilize each other with their knowledge and ideas.
Jun
21
comment Which European countries did not have a revolution in the aftermath of the French Revolution and why?
@dan04: Because revolutions come up because the time is ripe for them, and this more often than never is not hindered by borders?
Jun
21
comment Who is the earliest recorded person?
@RISwampY: There are written accounts of persons that go back further than 3200BC. The problem is that they become increasingly mystical, since they were written later. So IMO Anixx does have a point with his question. I think this all boils down to the question: Recorded by contemporary scribes, or recorded in retrospect? If it's the former, it might be possible to identify some ruler (likely a Pharaoh or a Mesopotamian king) who first had his name recorded in clay or stone for some deed. If the latter, things become muddier the further back we go, until they're lost in the mists of time.
Apr
8
comment What was the most important cause of the Second World War?
Excellent answer, IMO. +1 from me.
Apr
8
comment Are there any theories about what health problems would a man of the past suffer in the current age?
Note that native Americans died of those diseases because they had been cut off from the rest of the world and had had no contact to the germ. Europe, Asia, and Africa were always quick to share their diseases. (I think the plague is supposed to have jumped from rats to humans somewhere in Asia, and then went to kill half of Europe. When the measles hit Faeroe island after 65 years in 1846, 99.5% of those younger than 65 became infected. Measles also killed more than a 4th of the Hawaiian population in 1848 and a 4th of the inhabitants of the Fiji islands in 1874.)
Apr
4
comment What was Lenin's major criticism of or differences with Marx?
IIRC, Lenin also propagated turning a Bourgeois revolution into a Communist one, never mind that Marx was thinking of a worker's revolution. I am a bit hazy on this, though, it's long ago that I had to learn that.
Apr
4
comment Are Americans More Obsessed With the Military Aspect of History? If so, why?
@BrotherJack Some of their tribes, like the Greeks, Latins, or Celts, settled huge areas, dispersing or assimilating the people living there when they arrived, only to in turn be driven out by yet others. (Think of the Germanic expansion driving the Celts out of central Europe, and the Slavic off to the east.) When we then come to the early medieval times, most European people have already found their place, but those waves just continued.
Apr
4
comment Are Americans More Obsessed With the Military Aspect of History? If so, why?
@BrotherJack: Retrospectively, genocide might have been too harsh a word, because not all of them set out to wipe out other people. OTOH, the effect was certainly the same: those other people disappeared. In Europe, Homo Sapiens made the Neanderthals disappear (who themselves inhabited areas formerly inhabited by other hominids), and archeology finds one cultural layer after another overrunning Europe, each sweeping their predecessor out the arena, until the first such wave in historical times, the Indo-Europeans, arrived.
Mar
28
comment Intersection Between Computer Science and History?
@ihtkwot: I was kinda sitting on my hands, trying not to post it, but in the end couldn't stop myself...
Mar
28
comment Intersection Between Computer Science and History?
Oh, and might I point out Hari Seldon, who proved beyond doubt that history can be statistically quantified and probabilistically predicted. :)
Mar
28
comment Intersection Between Computer Science and History?
@BrotherJack: Actually what I described wasn't an example of machine learning techniques. For those books, computers were "only" used to run the simulations based on the model the scientists had created. They were useful through their ability to run those simulations in mere hours (or maybe days, back then), while humans would have had to calculate for weeks, months, or even years to find the same results. But, yeah, natural language processing might be a very hot field, too, in history. I don't think anyone would tackle the Rosetta stone nowadays without the extensive help of computers. :)
Mar
28
comment Intersection Between Computer Science and History?
@ihtkwot: I think even the 2nd book is a bit out of date after 20 years, although, in essence, its prediction (we will run out of dumping grounds for our excess heat, carbon dioxide, waste, etc. before we run out of raw material) is probably still true. The authors said the 2nd book was triggered by the predictions of the 1st (we will run out of raw material) being rendered wrong. I suppose it's still a very good read, though. IIRC, the code for their mathematical model (in C, I think) was later put into the public domain. If you dig deep enough, you might still find it somewhere.
Mar
28
comment Intersection Between Computer Science and History?
@Sid: I am not sure what more I can say. Scientists are finding more and more correlations between the turmoils of the last millenniums and natural disasters. The Medieval Warm Period and the Little Ice Age caused flourishing and starvation of populations, and through this conquests, wars, and revolutions — IOW: what we consider history.