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Jun
24
comment Painting of a French man in a red jacket around 1850, who is this man?
@LauraAS, As for the model, I have this more to share. The painting itself is 'pre-impressionist' (again very far from his later works in the Académie/Salon technique). See the play with the patches of sunlight on the ground, the chestnut trees, the dresses, the uniforms. And GH was a student of Charles Gleyre. Now who else were students of Charles Gleyre? Monet, Bazille, Whistler, Renoir and Sisley. So may be these artists also made some copies of the same earlier artist. Once you get a list of names, researching might be easier.
Jun
21
comment Painting of a French man in a red jacket around 1850, who is this man?
@LauraAS. It could however be a copy by GH of some earlier painting by a local French painter. You'll agree that this is very far from the neoclassical style and subjects that GH will be later known for (more like David or Ingres). You probably know that young artists (GH would be in his mid 20s at the time) would improve their technique by copying other painters (in the Louvres for instance). So that's the only way I can think of that would reconcile the signature and the subjects.
Jun
21
comment Painting of a French man in a red jacket around 1850, who is this man?
Very unlikely IMO. The hair is different and all the piece of clothing point to a period between between 1800 and 1820. And this is a British uniform.
Jun
21
comment Painting of a French man in a red jacket around 1850, who is this man?
Except that none of the French kings you name have this face. Not even Louis XVIII - and surely not Louis Philippe of Charles X.
Jun
21
comment Painting of a French man in a red jacket around 1850, who is this man?
@LauraAS, I think you might have to change your attribution to Germán Hernández Amores. I saw the GH 'signature' in the lower left corner but I have a number of objections. If the scene is in France it is probably 50 years earlier. Fashion in the 1850's would demand crinoline-type dresses whereas the two female characters in the foreground wear empire dresses (even the same hat and same as the young girl). The uniform of the two officers in the back are also distinctively first empire and this seems consistent with several other characters in the background (revolutionary bonnets).
Apr
25
comment Where did the Gaels originate?
@Noldorin (end :-) To sum it up, IMO, the Celtic superstrata in Ireland came from the South through metal trade (tin ore in Cornwall), not from the continent through the French rivers and the English Channel and way before La Tene. I'm sure you've read some of Barry Cunliffe's book. I'm more on this side than on the Historic Halstatt Academic theories. In my view Celts from Spain were there much before what is attested and were the Atlantic arms of the Mediterranean Phoenician traders.
Apr
25
comment Where did the Gaels originate?
@Noldorin, (cont'd) Look at all the mentions of Tarshish/Tartessos in the Bible. Also consider recent claims that Tartessian bear some Celtic languages characteristics and Celtoiberian is a Q-Celtic, as Goidelic is. Consider that Spain was very rich in all sorts of metals readily available from many rivers (Rio Tinto - RIO (NYSE)). We are talking here time periods way before Halstatt here.
Apr
25
comment Where did the Gaels originate?
@Noldorin, "Seeing no reason to doubt this" is probably a little bit provocative and you are right to oppose the linguistic and genetic evidence (J2 and R1 HG) which is overwhelming. However there are a lot of dots to connect here. In my view the Proto-Celts or Proto Italo-Celts were masters of metallurgy which I surmise they "learned" in the Balkans as early as 2.5 KYBC. Because this was the Bronze Age, trade was necessary to procure tin and copper from different regions. In the late Bronze Age at least, this was the speciality of Phoenicians in the Mediterranean.
Jan
22
comment African Clicking Language
Also, you might mention that clicking languages are a tactical advantage in stalking based hunting techniques because they are not easily noticed by potential preys. Typically, groups of hunters would coordinate their actions (selecting a prey, encircling it, etc) through clicks inaudible among the background savanna noises.
Jun
17
comment What right/legitimacy did Normans have to a kingdom in Southern Italy?
+1 for JJ Norwich. Also see "Byzantium", "Venice" and Venetian Music. My contemporary Gibbons Also. in Italy, the Hauteville are called Altavilla.
Mar
20
comment To what can we trace the idea of “civic responsibility”?
@jwenting. Absolutely!!! "Civic responsibility" (respect of the common wealth) and "nationalism" (defense of the group) are two facets of a far more global set of instincts: social instincts. They occur in various species, especially "superior" mammals. The evolutionary advantage is obvious: these instincts benefit the society which protects the individuals. For this very same reason they are also well regarded among fellow group members which explains why these feelings are genetically dominant as they can confer leadership and therefore procreational advantages to their bearers.
Jan
22
comment First time the sail ship technology took off
@MarkC.Wallace, Hermann. Regarding the Nile, there is a particularity worth noting: the Nile stream carries ships downstream. Conversely, the dominating winds blow from North to South and thus carry the ships upstream. This is shown on many antic reliefs on site and in museums (in Mastabas for instance). So, on their way to lower Egypt, sailors would simply use the stream and would instead use the force of the wind on their way back to upper Egypt. This can be interpreted as an indication that sail ships were probably used pretty early in ancient Egypt. Later models have been found as well.
Jan
22
comment Did the Romans “copy” their political system from the Greeks?
A possibly more interesting question IMO would be to compare the place of sacredness in Early Rome to that of Greek oligarchies: I find it striking how the stability of Early Rome was guaranteed by a host of sacred rules and laws effectively preventing a comeback of tyranny: the Pomerium, the Rubicon etc. These rules managed to keep the political regime close to a democracy for a considerable amount o time. When they were broken (Sulla's entering the Pomerium or Caesar crossing the Rubicon) Rome's democratic regime was in jeopardy.
Jan
22
comment Did the Romans “copy” their political system from the Greeks?
1/ the "Greeks" had many different systems, arguably one for each city state, Sparta always stayed an oligarchy; whereas Athens, Thebes and Argos enjoyed various "democratic" periods. 2/ even for a given city such as Athens, there were many different systems: the successive regimes of Draco, Peisistratos and Pericles have little in common. There are however recurring patterns: royalty => revolt => oligarchy => revolution => democracy => empire/hegemony. But this is not limited to the Greek or Roman worlds. It's just a consequence of the spread of education; and it is still at work today.
Dec
24
comment What's the story behind Christmas?
You might be interrested by a theory linking Christmas as the 25th of December and the cult of sol invictus, Constantine's god, but even before him, Elagabalus' god. From sol invictus, you can go back to Harpocrates (Horus the younger). See especially how the date of the 25th of December was selected. More generally, you can have a look at the book "Christ in Egypt, the Horus-Jesus connection"; controversial but interresting.
Dec
15
comment How does Göbekli Tepe fit into the current picture of society development?
I can't agree more. I can't remember the source but I've read that a genetic mutation of a particular species of wheat (in which the grains stay longer on the ear once ripe) has been traced back a few kilometers away from Göbekli Tepe only. here is a wikipedia source actually. I personally believe that the spread of the megalithic civilization typical of the European Atlantic facade, from the South northwards, also maps to the spread of agriculture.
Nov
13
comment How did France worsen its relationship with Turkey?
@DVK, It's always been like this. Summary: 1/ Groups exist to compete against each other 2/ subgroups/entities/individuals compete against each other for the dominance of the parent group. 3/ apply recursively. Yet in a low-threat-collaboration-friendly environment "Nice guys finish first" ;-) and this is what our world is quickly becoming. On the other hand "preventive strike" is the best example of self fulfilling prophecy. Hence the need for Game Theory... But I do see your point - at my age one's angel wings are somewhat worn out ;-)
Nov
13
comment How did France worsen its relationship with Turkey?
@DVK Sociobiology shows that tribalism plays out as an evolutionary advantages to both groups and individuals. With the advent of the Global Village more and more people feel their ultimate tribe is no less than humankind (which explains why warmongering is perceived as unhelpful). Weimar Republic crowds can be excused for having no real sense of the Global Village. We can't. Morality: Working in telecoms or the media, blogging, communicating with your kind is an efficient way of making mankind efficient and more in control of its own destiny and of that of its tiny cosmic raft: planet Earth.
Sep
13
comment Madness in the early modern era (pre-enlightenment, Habsburg monarchy)
Also cited in the book I refer to in my previous comment, and by the same authors (mother and son, both psychiatrists) the sourcebook "Three Hundred Years of Psychiatry (1535-1860)".
Sep
13
comment Madness in the early modern era (pre-enlightenment, Habsburg monarchy)
Although this book deals with a period slightly more recent than the one you're after, I can only recommend the paperback "George III and the Mad-business". Using King George's condition, it comprehensively addresses the economical, medical and political aspects of how madness was dealt with at the turn of the 19th century. I'm not too sure how easy it is to get hold of a copy 20+ years after its publication though.