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Feb
6
comment What is the earliest passage that describes Hippocrates' observation that blood stratifies into four layers?
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Feb
6
comment What is the earliest passage that describes Hippocrates' observation that blood stratifies into four layers?
... Democritus (460—370 BC) argued that knowledge can be gained from the senses, and Aristotle (384–322 BC) similarly argued for a posteriori knowledge, though the latter also said reason was sufficient to arrive at truth. The Aristotelean method is based on observing phenomena and using reason to discover the form or essence. Note Democritus lived at the same time as Hippocrates.
Feb
6
comment What is the earliest passage that describes Hippocrates' observation that blood stratifies into four layers?
Simplicius ascribed the imperative to "account for appearances" (σωζειν τα φαινομενα; the notion that a theory must account for observations) to the Platonic school in his comments (written somewhere between 529-560 AD) on Aristotle's "On the Heavens". That's not to say that the Platonic school argued that truth can arise from perceptions, but it points out that observation has a place. Epicurus (341-270 BC), on the other hand, did argue that truth can be determined by knowledge gained from the senses.
Feb
6
comment What is the earliest passage that describes Hippocrates' observation that blood stratifies into four layers?
RE: attitude toward observation-not so. From Galen's commentary on the very work: "Of matters in dispute based on skill, observation decides some, and reasoning decides others. Things decided by observation, therefore, require a finely discerning observation, and those decided by reasoning require a well-trained argumentation. [...] To know whether ruminants have four stomachs and sheep have one, observation is required, not reasoning."
Feb
4
comment What is the earliest passage that describes Hippocrates' observation that blood stratifies into four layers?
"On the Nature of Man" discusses the humoral theory, but I don't see it describe the observation that drained blood stratifies. The closest I can find in it is "And when men are cut, the blood that flows is at first very hot and very red, and then it flows with more phlegm and bile mixed with it," which is in a section describing how all fluid, when forced from the body, eventually consist of a mixture of humors, in support of the thesis that human nature consists of a mixture of humors rather than a single element.
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31
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Jan
31
asked What is the earliest passage that describes Hippocrates' observation that blood stratifies into four layers?