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May
19
comment Why have some territorial annexations been rejected by the international community?
@EverardO'Donnell: Thank you very, very much! That's certainly enough material to keep me occupied, much less the Golan!
May
18
comment Why have some territorial annexations been rejected by the international community?
@EverardO'Donnell: Thank you, you've given me much material to google for.
May
17
comment Why have some territorial annexations been rejected by the international community?
@MarkC.Wallace: That is why I ask about the history of annexations in general, not about the Golan Heights in particular. Would you disagree that it is important to learn about history in order to understand the present?
May
16
comment Why have some territorial annexations been rejected by the international community?
@MarkC.Wallace: Thank you. I am trying to understand why the international community rejects Israel's annexation of the Golan Heights. In contrast to Kuwait or Crimea, the Golan Heights were captured in a defensive war, i.e. the country that got the land was the attacked country. If the annexation is not accepted by the international community, then there is no longer territorial risk for countries to start wars. But of course I'm biased: I'm Israeli. I would like to understand the historical precedent for such a rejection. After that, I'll ask the proper questions on Politics.SE.
May
16
comment Why have some territorial annexations been rejected by the international community?
@SamuelRussell: I see, thanks. Perhaps asking for specific examples of both accepted and unaccepted annexations would be better? I could then do the comparisons on my own and ask more focused questions. I just found the wikipedia article on annexation which has some recent examples, but they are all biased and obviously the result of edit wars and nationalistic Wikipedia editing. The linked references are cherrypicked, i.e. no better than the article itself.
May
16
comment Why have some territorial annexations been rejected by the international community?
@SJuan76: I actually do intend to ask a similar question on Politics.SE, but first I want to understand the historical aspect of annexation.
Apr
26
comment When and why did having long hair become associated with women, and short hair with men?
@fdb: Additionally, pictures of Jesus as seen in popular and Western culture tend to portray a middle-ages European form: white and thin. It is much more likely that Jesus was dark, broad, and tall. Outside the church of the nativity in Nazareth there are portraits of Jesus from all over the world, depending on from where they came they show Jesus as slanty eyed, or black, or fat, etc. It seems that (every) man has created Jesus in his own form.
Apr
1
comment Why did the Germans fall behind the Americans in the development of the atomic bomb after an initial lead?
I should mention that the CANDU reactors are heavy water reactors, and I think that it is commonly accepted that they are today's safest and most efficient reactor design. I do not think that choosing heavy water over material refinement is inherently a sabotaging decision.
Apr
1
comment Why did the Germans fall behind the Americans in the development of the atomic bomb after an initial lead?
@BenCrowell: I believe that the reference to Einstein had more to do with the energy equivalence equation (E=mc<sup>2</sup>) than relativity directly. The energy of an atomic bomb comes from the matter that is converted to energy.
Mar
19
comment Destruction of iconic structures in wars of the 20th century and later
@taninamdar: The truth is that they're not too happy with Israel or the US being qualified as a "nation" either, but they are in control of the territory, operating civil services, and collecting taxes.
Feb
22
comment When has serious unemployment among educated young populations not led to revolution or war?
The people have their bread and circuses.
Feb
3
comment Have fair-skinned peoples ever been the lower/oppressed class?
Even today, in modern Hebrew the word Kush is used as a derogatory word for dark-skinned people, much like Nigger is used in English.
Jan
5
comment Lion in the european monarchies' flags
Seems to be a dupe of this question.
Nov
10
comment Have fair-skinned peoples ever been the lower/oppressed class?
Thank you Greg. Actually, I tried to pre-emptively prevent that mistake from being made in the question.
Nov
8
comment Have fair-skinned peoples ever been the lower/oppressed class?
Thank you. Unless one goes out specifically to look for it, African history is largely ignored. I am very glad to see this contribution.
Nov
5
comment What was the first Solar Eclipse that was demonstrably predicted in advance?
@sdenham: Very interesting, thank you. I had never heard that, though I see now that the wikipedia article on the device mentions it.
Jul
9
comment Is “Friends, Romans, …” a historical speech?
@theodox: I suspected as much, but the idea of opening with such a greeting is creatively effective. It creates instant rapport with the audience. I wondered if this building of rapport in fact is factual, not necessarily word-for-word translation.
Jul
9
comment Is “Friends, Romans, …” a historical speech?
Thank you for the insight, Dan, I actually do appreciate your criticism. Considering the the historical event was the basis of the fictional work, and considering the popularity of the quote and it's association with the historical figure, I found it prudent to know if the quote was attributed to the right place.
Jul
8
comment Is “Friends, Romans, …” a historical speech?
@YannisRizos: I had actually waited a bit to see if you would answer. When the question became a popular question I figured that I better select Mark's answer (and he provided a great link). Go ahead and answer and I'll accept it!
Jul
8
comment What did the Romans do for Judea?
This is a very interesting, unique perspective.