722 reputation
314
bio website dotancohen.com
location
age 37
visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen Nov 23 at 15:03

Nov
10
comment Have fair-skinned peoples ever been the lower/oppressed class?
Thank you Greg. Actually, I tried to pre-emptively prevent that mistake from being made in the question.
Nov
8
comment Have fair-skinned peoples ever been the lower/oppressed class?
Thank you. Unless one goes out specifically to look for it, African history is largely ignored. I am very glad to see this contribution.
Nov
5
comment What was the first Solar Eclipse that was demonstrably predicted in advance?
@sdenham: Very interesting, thank you. I had never heard that, though I see now that the wikipedia article on the device mentions it.
Jul
9
comment Is “Friends, Romans, …” a historical speech?
@theodox: I suspected as much, but the idea of opening with such a greeting is creatively effective. It creates instant rapport with the audience. I wondered if this building of rapport in fact is factual, not necessarily word-for-word translation.
Jul
9
comment Is “Friends, Romans, …” a historical speech?
Thank you for the insight, Dan, I actually do appreciate your criticism. Considering the the historical event was the basis of the fictional work, and considering the popularity of the quote and it's association with the historical figure, I found it prudent to know if the quote was attributed to the right place.
Jul
8
comment Is “Friends, Romans, …” a historical speech?
@YannisRizos: I had actually waited a bit to see if you would answer. When the question became a popular question I figured that I better select Mark's answer (and he provided a great link). Go ahead and answer and I'll accept it!
Jul
8
comment What did the Romans do for Judea?
This is a very interesting, unique perspective.
Jul
8
comment Is “Friends, Romans, …” a historical speech?
Thank you for that wonderful link.
Jul
8
comment Is “Friends, Romans, …” a historical speech?
@YannisRizos: Thank you, I'm off to research that.
Jun
26
comment When does a political question become a history question?
Most definitely a dupe! Thank you Mark.
May
8
comment When did polygamy start becoming illegal?
I must dispute this answer. I recently had a conversation with the two wives of a neighbour. Points #3 (Human Nature) and #4 (Economics) are in contradiction to their experience as they shared with me. Though the first wife was initially jealous of the second wife, but they became friendly after a few years. The living conditions were never uncomfortable as both women (and children) lived in separate houses on the same land. Additionally, the husband is dirt-dirt-poor, so economics is not a factor.
Dec
3
comment How did Greece avoid the Soviet sphere of influence?
Thank you Tom. That does exactly answer the question.
Feb
3
comment When did we discover air?
I found the Wikipedia link to [Air (Classical Element)[en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_%28classical_element%29] from your Empedocles link. That is about as close to an answer as I expect to come, so I'm accepting this answer. Thank you!
Feb
3
comment When did we discover air?
Thank you. In fact, in English it is translated to 'air' but in Hebrew it is translated to 'wind'. If someone could read the original Byz then I would be interested in hearing their comments.
Dec
17
comment What lands have been called by names chosen to disassociate those lands from its inhabitants
I see. Thanks.‏
Dec
17
comment What lands have been called by names chosen to disassociate those lands from its inhabitants
Are you implying that the names Helena (Greece) and Turkey are offensive to one another?
Dec
17
comment What lands have been called by names chosen to disassociate those lands from its inhabitants
That means that they do not recognise the ruling party's legitimacy and so accept no ruling by them as authoritative (culturally sensitive or not).
Dec
17
comment What lands have been called by names chosen to disassociate those lands from its inhabitants
Not at all, both names derive from the same tribe from what I've understood. Neither are derogatory, but the local government feels that the Anglacized "Burma" is less preferable to the local pronunciation of "Myama" (hence, Myanmar: the 'r' is not pronounced like native English speakers expect).
Dec
17
comment What lands have been called by names chosen to disassociate those lands from its inhabitants
Thank you, I was completely ignorant about that bit of Turkish and Greek history.
Dec
17
comment What lands have been called by names chosen to disassociate those lands from its inhabitants
Thank you soliloquyy. It seems to me that the German intention was to Germanize the lands (make them seem German) rather than to disservice the Poles. Maybe a bit of both?