2,550 reputation
1425
bio website noldorin.com
location London, United Kingdom
age 23
visits member for 2 years, 6 months
seen Mar 17 at 21:43

entrepreneur; graduate in mathematics / theoretical computer science / theoretical physics; polymath-in-training

based in London, United Kingdom


Mar
17
comment Where did the Gaels originate?
This isn't true. Britons had a Celtic culture, albeit perhaps not a wholly Celtic origin in people.
Mar
2
awarded  Notable Question
Feb
28
awarded  Good Answer
Feb
24
awarded  Notable Question
Jan
30
comment What is the history of Cartography?
Precisely! Then we're in agreement. :)
Jan
30
comment What is the history of Cartography?
Poorly proved yes, but moreover not put into a cohesive framework. As a mathematician, I can't stress this enough – he created a complete system for plane geometry as far as I'm aware, and was the first to show it was complete.
Jan
28
comment What is the history of Cartography?
That's not true re Euclid's works. He systematised plane geometry in a way that had never been done before. He made a complete theory from disparate bits of knowledge.
Dec
18
comment How did people acquire things in the pre-Roman Celtic world?
I don't think that's true, from what I've read. Only tribal leaders, princes, and kings would be buying chariots as far as I'm aware. From what I've read, this sort of trade was simply dwarfed by that done via bartering!
Dec
18
comment How did people acquire things in the pre-Roman Celtic world?
No worries. I see your point; I suppose you were focusing on the proto-money aspect because it's more interesting/unexpected for the context, which is true.
Dec
18
comment What were the civic privileges created for the Jews by Porcius Festus?
Indeed, the sacking of the temple is a long and complex story, but Titus certainly did not order it, and was angry to find out it happened. When you riot, kill lots of Romans, and then hold out for months in your walled city, the invading army is always going to go a bit wild though. As for their religion, the Romans were generally very tolerant, except when it came in direct conflict with Roman rule; unfortunately the Jews' view of themselves as the "chosen people" inevitably led to problems as time went by.
Dec
18
comment What were the civic privileges created for the Jews by Porcius Festus?
jewishvirtuallibrary.org is a distinctly pro-Jewish website, run by a pro-Jewish organisation, indeed mainly by Jews. The subjective and emotional words used in that extract do not represent historical consensus, if indeed one exists even. Certainly, I have seen many historians indicate how overwhelmingly reasonable the Romans were with the people of Judaea/Palestine for the most part, and I'm inclined to agree. They treated them at least as well as they did most other peoples they ruled over.
Dec
18
comment What were the civic privileges created for the Jews by Porcius Festus?
Equally, it's worth noting you've picked out a particularly biased source. Many historians maintain that Roman treatment of the Jews and Jewish regions was nothing special, except that the Jews were particularly seditious and prone to rioting, and eventually the Roman position toughened until the sack of Jerusalem by Titus. Interestingly, it was only in the reign of Hadrian (I believe) that Judaea was abolished, reconstituted as (Syria) Palestina, and the Jews were fully demoted from their place of 1st class citizens to undesirables.
Dec
18
comment How did people acquire things in the pre-Roman Celtic world?
It's also a fallacy to think the arrival and establishment of the Romans as the ruling power completely eliminated the bartering system. On the contrary, it's well known that bartering persisted not only in Britain but in many other parts of the Roman Empire, well into the first few centuries AC. In fact, for a time it became the predominant form again during the hyperinflation period of the 4th century, even in Italy and Greece.
Dec
18
comment How did people acquire things in the pre-Roman Celtic world?
The main trade partners of tribes and little kingdoms in pre-Roman (essentially Celtic) Britain (circa 500-0 BC), for example, were neighbouring tribes, Irish tribes, and northern Gallic/Belgic tribes.
Dec
18
comment How did people acquire things in the pre-Roman Celtic world?
See my comment on @Ri Swamp Yankee's post, but in summary while this is true, the predominant form was overwhelmingly barter still.
Dec
18
comment How did people acquire things in the pre-Roman Celtic world?
While this is true, it misses the point. All historical and archaeological sources seem to suggest bartering was by far the dominant means of trade.
Dec
18
comment Why did Alexander the Great succeed in overthrowing the Persian Empire?
I'm not very well acquainted with this area of history, but certainly the Persian Empire during Roman (Republican and Imperial times) was highly disjointed and almost continuously marred by faction and infighting. Some of the terrain can be considered quite inhospitable for foreigners (certainly to the Romans, even though they conquered large areas of it temporarily), though not of course the Arabs! Naturally, the obvious factors like Macedon's warlike culture and certain military innovations helped greatly, not to mention Alexander's personal military genius, leadership, and charisma!
Nov
24
comment Why was Africa colonized last of the continents in the Age of Discovery?
Also I can't find a date for when Sub-Saharan African cultures began metalworking, but American cultures began around 2000 BCE it seems. Whether they only used it for decoration is a different matter; they had the ability from then at least.
Nov
24
comment Why was Africa colonized last of the continents in the Age of Discovery?
@LennartRegebro: But (some of) the American cultures had writing long before the sub-Saharan African ones did! So it's not as simple as this... They were ahead in some respects, behind in others. Overall, it gets a bit subjective to judge.
Oct
11
awarded  Yearling