2,550 reputation
1425
bio website noldorin.com
location London, United Kingdom
age 23
visits member for 2 years, 6 months
seen Mar 17 at 21:43

entrepreneur; graduate in mathematics / theoretical computer science / theoretical physics; polymath-in-training

based in London, United Kingdom


Oct
19
comment What advanced educational opportunities were available to native Africans in the early 1890's?
Heh. There seems to be a lot of interest around the 1890s decade currently for some reason. :-P
Oct
19
comment Was the Roman Empire based on a 'plunder economy'?
I have to agree with you here. It was certainly not what the Romans set out to do, though it may have happened in the end. Worth noting though, is that wherever they plundered they also built an infrastructure and trading posts, supported by a Roman garrison.
Oct
19
comment Did the USA win the counter insurgency war in the Vietnam war?
@Sardathrion: No, but I think it's common view. :-) The U.S. military was not at all trained for guerilla warfare; indeed hadn't really been involved in any since that fought the Native Americans! I think the result of the war and testimonies of the soldiers is proof enough, hopefully.
Oct
19
comment Is there actual debate over which country (Brazil or Portugal) is the successor state to the original Portugal?
Of course not, don't be silly. Portugal was the originator of Brazil as a country, and still the more powerful country at the time of independence.
Oct
18
comment Are the Xibe people the same as the Manchu?
@TomAu, But there is no evidence to suppose this really. On the contrary, they seem to stem from the same people originally, and were "one" at some point in not-too-distant history.
Oct
18
comment Why did Hitler attack the Soviet Union when he was still busy fighting the United Kingdom?
@HarleyHolcombe, yeah Ireland definitely isn't on the penninsula, oops. :-) I think it's kind of vague when the "penninsula" ends though. It was always a loosely defined term I feel. In any case, it would seem that Nazi Germany and Spain shared fascist ideologies (the former even helped during the latter's civil war, though Franco couldn't stand Hitler). Switzerland always held too much Nazi money in its banks to make an invasion worthwhile, I heard!
Oct
18
comment Why was the Irish War of Independence in 1918 successful when other revolts failed?
This is true... Just pointing out it includes the case in context though!
Oct
18
comment Were Shakespeare's plays written for “high culture” or “entertain the bawdy masses” during his time?
I agree. Shakespeare's plays were designed to appeal to the masses as well as the higher class educated folk. Adults and children alike, often. The Simpsons is a great modern example, I feel, as it targets adults and children alike, and can be both high-brow and base, often at the same time!
Oct
18
comment Why was the Irish War of Independence in 1918 successful when other revolts failed?
The Irish had indeed been particularly abused in WWI, used as some of the most expendable infantry.
Oct
18
comment Did the USA win the counter insurgency war in the Vietnam war?
Case in point; well said. The U.S.A. lost, and big-time. Maybe they won the big battles; but the guerilla warfare never suited them and they never gained any real control.
Oct
18
comment What factors permitted Buddhism to be successful in Japan but Christianity less so?
I'm not answering your question I'm afraid, but I can say that Buddhism was introduced to Japan much earlier than Christianity, and had much longer to integrate. Buddhism is also arguably a religion much more subject to interpretation and integration into arbitrary cultures, whereas Christianity permeates all aspects of daily life in a more domineering/blatant way, I'd argue. Also, correct me if I'm wrong, but Christianity was only introduced to Japan during/close to its period of seclusion/non-involvement with the rest of the world -- this could explain a lot!
Oct
18
comment Did the roman conquerors have directives/guidelines to either integrate or assimilate foreign tribes/folks?
But to be sure, the Romans were never intent on suppressing cultures, only an imposing there's where they saw fit. Usually, in order to maintain territory and control and promote their idea of civilisation.
Oct
18
comment Did the roman conquerors have directives/guidelines to either integrate or assimilate foreign tribes/folks?
@Hauser: It was all a passive assimilation. Some Romans migrated to newly conquered territories, often the ruling and military class, and often developed the infrastructure there. Consider that most of pre-Roman Europe was highly uncivilised and non-technically very primitive. Any native person wishing to succeed in life would be sure to learn Latin and adopt Roman customs and culture. Failure to adhere to Roman codes were often treated very severely. After a century or two, assimilation was pretty good and tendency to rebel diminished.
Oct
18
comment Did the roman conquerors have directives/guidelines to either integrate or assimilate foreign tribes/folks?
@Andrei: Correct. They only started clamping down on Christianity when it was proving to be an ideological opposition to loyalty to the Emporer, and also creating radical rebellions. They let the Jews practice there religion freely as well; they only persecuted them in response to rebellions.
Oct
18
comment Why did Hitler attack the Soviet Union when he was still busy fighting the United Kingdom?
@Caimen: Thank you. +1 now. The British Empire in fact should get credit too, since many Australians and Canadians fought for the British Empire in WWII... though I won't be that much of a pedant :-)
Oct
18
comment Why did Hitler attack the Soviet Union when he was still busy fighting the United Kingdom?
@Rincewind42: No, you don't. "it was not possible for England to counter attack in Europe" for one, is wrong. I don't care if your Scottish, you're still being incorrectly Anglocentric. Scotland isn't a country either, remember. Only the UK is.
Oct
18
comment Which 11 countries were democratic in 1941?
@Rory: Not at all. Please do not confuse universal suffrage (which only appeared in any country during the last century) and democracy! The former is a subset of the latter.
Oct
18
comment When was divorce made illegal again in Ireland?
As in, 5 minutes on Google could answer the question for you, easily. :-P
Oct
18
comment When were swords last used in European warfare?
Alright, well sorry, but you're missing out on an up-vote and potential accepted answer then. A recorded rumour by a single soldier isn't quite enough for me I'm afraid.
Oct
18
comment Why did Hitler attack the Soviet Union when he was still busy fighting the United Kingdom?
No, no, no! England is not a country, and has not been for several hundred years. (The United Kingdom of) Great Britain is the country that participated in the war you mean. In fact, the British Empire as a whole entered the war. You do grave injustice to the Scottish, Welsh, Australians, Canadians, Indians and many others who fought for the British Empire.