2,900 reputation
1627
bio website noldorin.com
location London, United Kingdom
age 24
visits member for 3 years, 2 months
seen Dec 4 at 18:48

entrepreneur; graduate in mathematics / theoretical computer science / theoretical physics; polymath-in-training

based in London, United Kingdom


Apr
28
comment Is there any documentation regarding the use of war elephants in battles?
Yeah, I agree with you about Arabia by the way... it's geographical situation is perhaps the most advantageous thing. Also, perhaps just removing the threat of raiding Arab tribes.
Apr
28
comment Is there any documentation regarding the use of war elephants in battles?
That said, I get the feeling he could have very easily returned in a year or two with new soldiers (perhaps even a larger army), and conquered huge portions of the Indian subcontinent.
Apr
28
comment Is there any documentation regarding the use of war elephants in battles?
@Juicy: India's population even then was very sizeable, and moreover highly factional – there were many small warring kingdoms, since this was just before the period of the Mauryan Empire. If the Mauryans did it, I'm more than confident Alexander could have did it. That is, conquer basically all of northern and central India, though not the south immediately. Of course, the imminent problem to him was the mutiny of his army.
Apr
27
comment Is there any documentation regarding the use of war elephants in battles?
Interesting what you say about future plans to conquer Arabia by the way. Is this well documented/evidenced? It's believable, but then again Arabia didn't have much civilisation at that point: a lot of desert and nomadic Semitic tribes, with a few oases... no real reason for him to conquer it AFAIK.
Apr
27
comment Is there any documentation regarding the use of war elephants in battles?
@Juicy: Oh yes, by all means this is true. The details are slightly sketchy, but I believe low-level mutiny was already stirring up at that point, and Alexander couldn't risk it. Hence on advice of his generals and his own common sense, he wisely called it quits for then. (Though I believe he had intentions of returning later to finish the job.) I'm not sure I totally agree it wasn't his desire to turn Porus into a client state (it was certainly in his interest). For example, part of Bactria was a client state at one point, was it not?
Apr
27
comment Is there any documentation regarding the use of war elephants in battles?
Interesting. How reliable is this though? (The identity of the author would certainly suggest only partially) It's also well known, I might point out, that in the Battle of Zama (and possibly others late in the 2nd Punic War too), Scipio Africanus ordered the Roman cavalry to blow loud horns, which spooked many of the elephants, and they actually ended up running back and trampling the Carthaginian ranks.
Apr
23
comment Which one is ancient Hinduisam or Dravidiasm
This question is terribly ill-informed. It must be closed in its current state.
Mar
17
comment Where did the Gaels originate?
This isn't true. Britons had a Celtic culture, albeit perhaps not a wholly Celtic origin in people.
Mar
2
awarded  Notable Question
Feb
28
awarded  Good Answer
Feb
24
awarded  Notable Question
Jan
30
comment What is the history of Cartography?
Precisely! Then we're in agreement. :)
Jan
30
comment What is the history of Cartography?
Poorly proved yes, but moreover not put into a cohesive framework. As a mathematician, I can't stress this enough – he created a complete system for plane geometry as far as I'm aware, and was the first to show it was complete.
Jan
28
comment What is the history of Cartography?
That's not true re Euclid's works. He systematised plane geometry in a way that had never been done before. He made a complete theory from disparate bits of knowledge.
Dec
18
comment How did people acquire things in the pre-Roman Celtic world?
I don't think that's true, from what I've read. Only tribal leaders, princes, and kings would be buying chariots as far as I'm aware. From what I've read, this sort of trade was simply dwarfed by that done via bartering!
Dec
18
comment How did people acquire things in the pre-Roman Celtic world?
No worries. I see your point; I suppose you were focusing on the proto-money aspect because it's more interesting/unexpected for the context, which is true.
Dec
18
comment What were the civic privileges created for the Jews by Porcius Festus?
Indeed, the sacking of the temple is a long and complex story, but Titus certainly did not order it, and was angry to find out it happened. When you riot, kill lots of Romans, and then hold out for months in your walled city, the invading army is always going to go a bit wild though. As for their religion, the Romans were generally very tolerant, except when it came in direct conflict with Roman rule; unfortunately the Jews' view of themselves as the "chosen people" inevitably led to problems as time went by.
Dec
18
comment What were the civic privileges created for the Jews by Porcius Festus?
jewishvirtuallibrary.org is a distinctly pro-Jewish website, run by a pro-Jewish organisation, indeed mainly by Jews. The subjective and emotional words used in that extract do not represent historical consensus, if indeed one exists even. Certainly, I have seen many historians indicate how overwhelmingly reasonable the Romans were with the people of Judaea/Palestine for the most part, and I'm inclined to agree. They treated them at least as well as they did most other peoples they ruled over.
Dec
18
comment What were the civic privileges created for the Jews by Porcius Festus?
Equally, it's worth noting you've picked out a particularly biased source. Many historians maintain that Roman treatment of the Jews and Jewish regions was nothing special, except that the Jews were particularly seditious and prone to rioting, and eventually the Roman position toughened until the sack of Jerusalem by Titus. Interestingly, it was only in the reign of Hadrian (I believe) that Judaea was abolished, reconstituted as (Syria) Palestina, and the Jews were fully demoted from their place of 1st class citizens to undesirables.
Dec
18
comment How did people acquire things in the pre-Roman Celtic world?
It's also a fallacy to think the arrival and establishment of the Romans as the ruling power completely eliminated the bartering system. On the contrary, it's well known that bartering persisted not only in Britain but in many other parts of the Roman Empire, well into the first few centuries AC. In fact, for a time it became the predominant form again during the hyperinflation period of the 4th century, even in Italy and Greece.