2,730 reputation
1527
bio website noldorin.com
location London, United Kingdom
age 24
visits member for 2 years, 11 months
seen Aug 23 at 1:09

entrepreneur; graduate in mathematics / theoretical computer science / theoretical physics; polymath-in-training

based in London, United Kingdom


Dec
18
comment How did people acquire things in the pre-Roman Celtic world?
While this is true, it misses the point. All historical and archaeological sources seem to suggest bartering was by far the dominant means of trade.
Dec
18
comment Why did Alexander the Great succeed in overthrowing the Persian Empire?
I'm not very well acquainted with this area of history, but certainly the Persian Empire during Roman (Republican and Imperial times) was highly disjointed and almost continuously marred by faction and infighting. Some of the terrain can be considered quite inhospitable for foreigners (certainly to the Romans, even though they conquered large areas of it temporarily), though not of course the Arabs! Naturally, the obvious factors like Macedon's warlike culture and certain military innovations helped greatly, not to mention Alexander's personal military genius, leadership, and charisma!
Nov
24
comment Why was Africa colonized last of the continents in the Age of Discovery?
Also I can't find a date for when Sub-Saharan African cultures began metalworking, but American cultures began around 2000 BCE it seems. Whether they only used it for decoration is a different matter; they had the ability from then at least.
Nov
24
comment Why was Africa colonized last of the continents in the Age of Discovery?
@LennartRegebro: But (some of) the American cultures had writing long before the sub-Saharan African ones did! So it's not as simple as this... They were ahead in some respects, behind in others. Overall, it gets a bit subjective to judge.
Oct
11
awarded  Yearling
Oct
2
awarded  Good Answer
Oct
1
comment History of scientific regression
Ah yes, that's fair enough. It some ways it doesn't really matter that it was Genghis Khan though, only that he was Great Khan and supreme ruler of a highly centralised Empire (at that point).
Sep
30
comment History of scientific regression
@Michael: But are there circumstances when you can really attribute the fall of an empire to the death of specifically that man, and not an arbitrary one in his stead? can you really isolate environmental factors and all the events that led up to that point, everywhere? I think not.
Jul
6
awarded  Taxonomist
May
10
comment When were swords last used in European warfare?
Hah, that's a most interesting fact! Thanks for that. It seems he was an exceptional case though... a definite eccentric.
May
7
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
20
awarded  Good Question
Mar
19
comment How many recorded incidents are there of attacks on Australian soil?
@SamuelRussell: Yeah, I wouldn't disagree there. They were predominantly treated as subhuman, in a similar way as in the USA. I suppose another point is that there were definitely more Native Americans than Australian Aborigines before colonisation, but probably the biggest reason the Australian case gets so much less attention is that Australia has always been somehow less in the global public spotlight, and the USA has naturally gotten a huge amount of attention as the world superpower since the end of WWII.
Mar
19
awarded  Popular Question
Feb
23
comment When and where was salt as valuable as gold?
@WladimirPalant: It was more precious because they had a virtual monopoly on the trade!
Feb
22
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
19
comment Why wasn't the Republic of Ireland invaded (by either side) in WW2?
@FelixGoldberg: Fair enough. We'll just agree to disagree then. I'll accept it's a slightly subjective term, and it's not always clear-cut who's a mercenary and not! :)
Dec
19
comment Why wasn't the Republic of Ireland invaded (by either side) in WW2?
@FelixGoldberg: Thanks, but it's not technically wrong... Irish soldiers were paid and enticed by the British government to fight for them.
Dec
17
comment Which country traces its roots back to the oldest civilization?
@Anixx: Too little is known about that culture, I believe. It would be too much of a stretch to call it a genuine civilisation, in any cases, at present. Most likely what "civilised" aspects it did pick up were from the contact of Indo-European peoples with the advanced Middle-Eastern cultures at the time.
Dec
16
awarded  Pundit