2,700 reputation
1527
bio website noldorin.com
location London, United Kingdom
age 24
visits member for 2 years, 9 months
seen Jul 8 at 15:44

entrepreneur; graduate in mathematics / theoretical computer science / theoretical physics; polymath-in-training

based in London, United Kingdom


Nov
4
comment Why did Austronesian/Polynesian people not colonize Australia?
@DVK: I hate that that book pervades amateur/layman history and anthropology so thoroughly these days. Indeed, scholarly criticism of it has been far-reaching and severe in some cases. Certainly, it cannot be used as an only source. I maintain my point that the Maori were not particularly warlike in the (distant?) past... though perhaps I have misremembered completely!
Nov
4
comment How did ethnic Turkish people embrace Islam?
@NewAlexandria: Yeah true, but I'm not a history scholar... and scholars have the past had fewer reservations about the word. ;) Animism is possibly a better more precise term. Also, "shamanism" appears to be a loanword (via a series of intermediaries) ultimately from Sanskrit.
Nov
1
comment What were the reasons that the British colonies in North America rebelled but not others?
@JoeHobbit: That's true, though by that point Canada had already been significantly weakened as a global power and was approaching bankruptcy thanks to prodigal spending over the past 50 years, I believe. France still retained most of the "New France" territories when it ceded the Canadian ones to Britain and the American ones to Spain (roughly). So yeah, I think it would be fair to say France just cut their losses and accepted the unfavourable terms of the Treaty of Paris.
Oct
23
comment History of scientific regression
@Sardathrion: It probably is, yes. ;)
Oct
22
comment Why do we find a large number of nude male characters in ancient Greek paintings and sculptures?
Interesting theory. I'm sure you're well-qualified to speak, and your argument is cogent. Perhaps there is also a factor of artistic natural body that Ancient Greek culture celebrated in the human body amongst other things, and which in modern Western society has been suppressed through contemporary attitudes (prudishness, even)?
Oct
22
comment Is there a known society without cult of love?
@Drux: Nope, I think you're more or less right! I can speak from knowledge of the Catholic faith at least. In reality, many Catholic lay folk would not have viewed it in this narrow manner, for obvious/natural/human reasons, though it has been the official doctrine since the Early Church, I'd imagine.
Oct
22
comment Why did Austronesian/Polynesian people not colonize Australia?
It's ancillary, but I've intriguingly heard that despite the widespread connotations of some of the Polynesian peoples (e.g. Maori, Fijians) were historically a much more peaceful people, not so interested in expansion and conquest. I can't source this though, I'm afraid; just an anecdote I recently heard.
Oct
22
comment History of scientific regression
No, not in this pedantic sense. Eras are never truly ended by single people. The forces at large in the world at any time are inextricable from so many things; there is only the illusion one person or event has such influence. Take for example the "fall" of the Roman Empire, which we know know to have occurred for a number of long-standing reasons, and the ultimate transformation into the Dark Ages took decades if not centuries to happen, while certain aspects persisted long. It is far more subtle than what you seem to be asserting.
Oct
12
comment Evolution of the names of slaves
@coleopterist: I think it's as simple as the fact that when they were brought over, their owners and indeed proselytisers gave them Christian names for the sake of conversion, ease of remembrance & pronunciation, and whatnot. 2nd and 3rd generations of African slaves may not have even had names in their ancestral tongue, and quite possibly wouldn't be taught their that language. As to the surnames, these were simply assumed from the surname of their masters upon liberation. Very much in the same fashion as Ancient Roman manumission.
Oct
12
comment Where does the name of the country “Belarus” come from?
@SteelyDan: Indeed. It's the name given to the Varangians who settled in Russia, and later the people they ruled/descendents. I think Tom Au is thinking of Rurik.
Oct
12
comment Have atheists ever been persecuted in India?
Persecuted explicitly for their atheism? I'm not sure. Certainly, Buddhists have been persecuted at various points, and many Buddhists (especially Theravada I believe) are atheistic in the sense they reject the question of whether a higher power exists.
Oct
12
answered What are the most comprehensive historical references for ancient India?
Oct
12
comment In medieval India, was there a distinction between the army and the police?
@Russell: Oh, I'm pretty sure they've existed... just not quite the same concept as a modern "police" force!
Oct
12
comment How did ethnic Turkish people embrace Islam?
Don't forget the "Shamanism" that was the traditional/autochthonous religion of many Turkic and Mongolian tribes in Central Asia before the arrival of any of these major religions. There were also Taoist influences too, for sure.
Oct
12
comment History of scientific regression
Hah. No classicist would even think of arguing of this event as the end of the classical era. Since when would eras of civilisation determined by a singular academic figure? And not even an established great one at that. How about the fall of Rome (deposition of Romulus Augustus)? The first sack of Rome? The final closing of the Platonic Academy in 529 AD? The Crisis of the Third Century, or conversion of the Roman Empire to Christianity, at earliest surely?
Oct
12
comment History of scientific regression
Good examples. I think I like all of them. Certain a lot of technological/sociological advancement by the Romans was lost, in some cases for an entire millennium! Also, unless I read it too quickly though, this post should really mention the fact that so much Ancient Greek mathematics, science, philosophy, and historiography was lost for centuries in all Europe except the Byzantine Empire (though they still lost much!).
Oct
12
comment In medieval India, was there a distinction between the army and the police?
The police as a modern entity was only invented in the early 19th century in London, England. This seems to be a well-known and accurate fact. In that sense, while enforcement of law and public order has existed for millennia in various civilisation (India no doubt included), calling it a "police force" is probably too big a stretch.
Oct
12
comment What was the motivation for the Gregorian Calendar?
This is one of the several notable historical examples where some system is invented by a certain religious/social/national group yet other peoples, in full knowledge that it is superior, refuse to accept it for often bigoted/prideful reasons. e.g. Gregorian Calendar (Catholic, rejected by protestants), Metric System (French, rejected by English and others), The Copernican Revolution (partially rejected by organised Christianity for a long time). Of course, they all gave in in the end... it just a while!
Oct
12
comment What was the motivation for the Gregorian Calendar?
@mgb: Indeed. And the Russians, incredibly, didn't adopt it until the 20th century!
Oct
11
awarded  Yearling